1951 blockbuster snow event: Thursday 19th - Friday 20th July.

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Mount Lofty approx 1951 - very likely to be 19-20th July 1951.

Above photo: MOUNT LOFTY: A view of the Piccadilly Valley from Mount Lofty after snow.
Source: State Library of South Australia.
Photo B-56021
Permanent SLSA link: Permanent link B-56021
The information accompanying the photo on the SLSA website says: "Summary MOUNT LOFTY: A view of the Piccadilly Valley from Mount Lofty after snow" and "Dates / Publication details Approximately 1951".

It's very likely to be of the 19-20th July 1951 fall, one of the biggest snowfalls in SA's recorded history. This a snow view I've never seen and I've looked from the Mt Lofty summit across to Picadilly Valley numerous times over the past few years and wondered what it would look like after a heavy snowstorm. Now I know! The photographer is not named on the SLSA page. My guess is it was taken by a photographer working for one of the newspapers of the day.

I've now red most of the articles in the Trove database published on the blockbuster Thursday 19th - Friday 20th July 1951 snow event, and I've corrected them on Trove. I haven't red all the relevant articles and I'm sure further mining on Trove would find more info and observations.

A few of the newspaper articles I found are photos with accompanying text and as the photos are of very poor quality in the Trove reproductions I've only included two such articles here.

In brief, there were widespread and extensive falls of snow on Thursday 19th, then substantial falls in the hours of darkness overnight Thursday into Friday, and a few further snow showers on Friday rapidly tapering off during the day. Most of the snow cover had melted by about lunch time Friday.

The first reliable reports of falling snow I recall seeing were about sunrise on Thursday morning, in the Mid-North. The last reference to unmelted snow I recall seeing is "There was still a little snow on the crest of the Canowie hills, near Jamestown, today", the today being Saturday 21st and the Canowie hills being in the Mid-North.

Although there are reliable reports of snow falling in some Adelaide suburbs eg "Light show also fell for the first time for 35 years in southern south-eastern and eastern suburbs on Thursday" and "Office workers in high city buildings reported light snow falling at 3.15 p.m. today. Extensive falls were reported in the southern, south-eastern, and eastern suburbs, with heaviest falls near Belair", it doesn't seem to be as fully documented in the newspaper articles I've red as we might have hoped. I haven't seen any detailed report of snow in the Adelaide suburbs with many eyewitness accounts suburb by suburb and photos of falling snow. Now we have digicams and mobile phones and the internet I imagine the next snowfall in Adelaide suburbs will be much better documented in the media.

I haven't seen any yet but I'd be a bit surprised if there aren't scientific reports in journals by meteorologists on this event as it affected southern Australia generally.

I haven't formed a firm opinion as to whether this South Australian event was as big or bigger than the 1901 epic snow event. Some said it was the biggest fall since the 1901 event. My impression is that in South Australian snow folklore the 1951 event was the biggest since the 1901 event.

I don't recall any opinion expressed in the 1951 articles I've red that there was a fall in the intervening 50 years that was as big or bigger than the 1951 fall, except for this headline "EQUALS SNOW FALLS OF 1901 and 1917". I'll look into the 1917 fall in due course.

I'm confident but not certain there's been no fall of comparable magnitude in SA since the 1951 blockbuster fall.

These comments in the above paragraph apply to the overall event in SA. In particular districts it may be a different matter. For example, in the South-East I found another event in 1951 that was apparently considerably bigger than this one, and I'll post about that one separately.

One problem in comparing the epic 1901 event with the blockbuster 1951 event is that in 1901 there are reports published from correspondents in numerous towns scattered around SA, but this practice seems to have been substantially abandoned by the 1951 event.

I mentioned above that I've now red most of the articles in the Trove database published on the blockbuster Thursday 19th - Friday 20th July 1951 snow event, and I've corrected them on Trove.  Below are the ones I think together best describe the event. They aren't in strict chronological order so they do jump around a bit regarding the aspects and periods of the event they report on :)

The two days to keep in mind for this event in South Australia are Thursday 19th and Friday 20th July 1951.

Now this article is in the newspaper the "News", reporting extensive snowfalls on Thursday 19th July 1951.

News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 19 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130331422

SNOW FALLS IN CITY, MITCHAM

Office workers in high city buildings reported light snow falling at 3.15 p.m. today. Extensive falls were reported in the southern, south-eastern, and eastern suburbs, with heaviest falls near Belair.
South Australia had its most extensive snowfall of this winter today. A mid-north belt between Terowie and Jamestown had its heaviest fall for some years with snow still 8 in. deep in places this afternoon.

A Mitcham resident reported that snow began to fall soon after a heavy hailstorm.
Cars were coated as they drove through thick flakes at Blackwood and Belair.
In 10 minutes snow banked up 3 in. along fences and walls.
Mount Remarkable, in the Flinders Ranges, is snowcapped.
Booleroo Centre, about 12 miles away, had a snow fall from 11 a.m. to early afternoon. Light snow fell for 10 minutes at Snowtown and in the Hummocks Ranges from 11.30 a.m.
Children on their way to school at Terowie enjoyed snowfights. Snow fell steadily from 7.15 to 8.30 a.m.
The flakes melted quickly on wet streets in the town, but on the hills and dry surfaces snow lay 2 in. to 3 in. thick.
Roofs and trees were white and near-by hills were snow-clad.
Melting snow registered 9 points in the post office rain gauge and made the town slushy. It was the second snowfall at Terowie within three weeks.
2¼-hr. fall
Mrs. J. O. Pearce, of Whyte-Yarcowie, said snow was still falling late this morning. It had snowed almost continuously since 7.45 a.m.
Today's Jamestown sheep sale was abandoned because conditions were too cold and melting snow made the saleyard sloppy underfoot.
Mr. Vic Brauer, who is on a preliminary organising trip for the jubilee train tour, telephoned from Canowie Belt that the road between Terowie and Jamestown was under 4 in. of snow.
Light snow in the Mount Lofty Ranges filled ground crevices at the summit, but soon melted.
A Stirling resident said: "Snow started with light rain. Then it stopped raining and the snowflakes were bigger, but not enough to lie on the ground. They looked like almond petals falling."
Summertown also had a light fall about 9 a.m.
Bridgewater and Aldgate had light falls an hour later.
At Clare, snow covered the country in a white sheet about ¼ in. deep. Hills were snow-capped.
Other towns reporting snow in the widespread falls were Manoora, Nairne, Yeelanna, Kimba, and Buckleboo.

{end of quote}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130331422
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page11134739
APA citation
SNOW FALLS IN CITY, MITCHAM. (1951, July 19). News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130331422

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News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Friday 20 July 1951 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130328657

{quoting the whole article}

THIS WEEK IN WAIKERIE
Waikerie, Fri.: New and old settlers have reason to consider this week's weather has gone '"haywire."
It started with a rare lunar rainbow. Then there was more rain.
Yesterday the first snow in memory fell on the town, but melted as it hit the ground. There was heavy hail, and this morning the district was frost-coated."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130328657
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page11134765
APA citation
THIS WEEK IN WAIKERIE. (1951, July 20). News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved June 11, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130328657

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Friday 20 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/45718417

{quoting whole of article; I've put temperatures I've converted to Celsius using a Google converter in brackets [...]}

No Wonder It Snowed
Maximum temperature yesterday was 49.9 deg. [9.9] at 1.55 p.m., but it fell more than 10 deg. to 39.1 deg. [3.9] at 3.16 p.m. The minimum temperature was 37.2 deg. [2.9], recorded at 8.45 p.m. It was Adelaide's coldest day since July 18, 1949, when the maximum temperature was 49.7 deg. [9.8], the Deputy Director of Meteorological Services (Mr. H. E. Banfield) said last night. Mr. Banfield said the extensive snowfalls in the suburbs were the first for many years. Snow, accompanied by rain, fell in the metropolitan area in 1916. The coldest July day in Adelaide's history was July 23, 1879, when the maximum temperature was 47.2 deg.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45718417
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3197999
APA citation
No Wonder It Snowed. (1951, July 20). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45718417

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News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Friday 20 July 1951 Page 24.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130328538

An item in the News Stop Press which I interpret refers to the afternoon of Friday 20th.

"SNOW GONE Most hills snow melted in afternoon sun, and no further falls expected in daylight."

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News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Friday 20 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130328529

{quoting entire article}

More snow falls in hills
Hills residents woke to a white world this morning as early falls banked overnight snow deeper. Old residents said they had never known such heavy and prolonged falls on two consecutive days. The direction of hills traffic was reversed this morning as hundreds of sightseers in cars headed up to the snowline, which began at Crafers. Mount Barker road carried heavy traffic. Snow fell for short periods intermittently today. Market gardeners who left loaded vehicles over night in the hills brushed snow from their loads at the Central Market today. Hills motorists had snow troubles this morning. Cars left out overnight were covered in inches of snow.Some drivers had to pour hot water over their windscreens, and many found cars hard to start. When the snow began to melt, roads, specially back tracks, were dangerously slushy. Snow lay 6 in. deep over wide areas of the hills this morning, deeper in hollows, and festooned trees up to 50 ft. from the ground. The snowbelt was clearly visible to early workers in the city. Mr. D. Weman, of Crafers Hotel, said today: "Hundreds of children have been brought up here in tourist buses. "They are having a great time in the paddocks. Some have never seen snow before." A Mount Pleasant resident said snow overnight and again this morning made it the heaviest fall for more than 20 years. Snow covered the hills from Tungkillo to Teatree Gully for the first time for 13 years. Mrs. J. Foot, of Seaton Park. said there was a light snowfall there about 6 p.m. yesterday. It was the first fall district residents had ever known. "It fell for about five minutes." she said. Mr. A. R. Post, of Eudunda, said a heavy snowfall there early this morning covered everything several inches deep. It was the heaviest fall he had seen there in 22 years. Many people from Port Augusta and neighboring towns went out to see snow inches deep through Horrocks Pass this morning. Mrs. P. Filsell, of Williamstown, said today: "Snow was still thick this morning. "It is just 50 years ago, in July. 1901, since we had such a heavy fall." Continued rain and snow has aggravated the firewood shortage. Merchants said wet conditions were stopping them getting supplies. (Heavy snowfalls in other States—Page 2.)

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130328529
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page11134763
APA citation
More snow falls in hills. (1951, July 20). News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130328529

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The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 21 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55786576

{quoting the SA-snow-relevant part of a longer article}

"There was still a little snow on the crest of the Canowie hills, near Jamestown, today, but elsewhere in the State the excitement of Thursday and Friday's "snow fever" had passed, leaving only grey skies, drizzling rain, and piercing cold. "

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 21 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/45719556

{quoting the snow-relevant part of a longer article}

Snow Disappears In Many Areas

The heaviest snowfalls in memory which covered large areas of the State yesterday morning had vanished by early evening from many areas, including the Adelaide Hills.

Thousands of acres in the Wilmington area have been flooded and roads between Melrose and Wilmington are under water. Widespread frosts are forecast for the week-end. After scattered light showers today over the settled areas, fine but cold weather is forecast for tomorrow. Snow again fell yesterday in the Port Augusta district and schoolchildren were taken in bases to the top of Horrocks Pass to make snowballs. When snow was falling in the Adelaide Hills on Thursday night, Adelaide experienced at 10 p.m. its lowest July temperature for six years— 36.6 degrees. Last night the temperature shortly before 10 p.m. was 43.7 degrees. . Hundreds of visitors motored to Mt. Lofty yesterday to view the snow-covered ranges. Parcels of snow were brought back to the city by children who went in five buses on "snow tours" arranged by the Government Tourist Bureau. Light snow continued to fall intermittently at Whyte-Yarcowie up to 1 p.m. It was reported to be several feet deep in the Canowie hills. Light falls lasting only a few minutes were reported in nany other districts, including Peterborough and Willunga. Broken Hill saw its first snow yesterday. It arrived on open trucks from Peterborough and was used by railways employes for a snow fight. Bordertown had a heavy hailstorm about noon.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45719556
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3198017
APA citation
Snow Disappears In. (1951, July 21). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 12, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45719556

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Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Saturday 21 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/78657674

Quoting SA snow-relevant part of article. I've added temperatures converted to Celsius in brackets [...]. There's also some information about snowfalls in western Victoria in this article.

COLDEST DAY HERE FOR EIGHT YEARS
Thursday was Mount Gambier's coldest day for eight years. And yesterday was not much warmer.
Mr. J. K. Webster, working in Eustace Street Thursday afternoon, saw snow. It settled on his coat and melted when it touched. Mr. Webster was in France during World War 1 where he saw plenty of snow, and should be able to identify it.
Mr. H. W. Hosking (caretaker of the centenary tower) said the banks of the lakes and the mountain made a beautiful picture after Thursday morning's heavy hail fall.
Maximum temperature on Thursday was 46.5 degrees [8.1 Celsius], a drop of 12 degrees in 24 hours. The mercury rose only two degrees yesterday to 48.5 [9.2 Celsius].

End of quote.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78657674
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7729837
APA citation
COLDEST DAY HERE FOR EIGHT YEARS. (1951, July 21). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 13, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78657674

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Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 - 1954) Monday 23 July 1951 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96254135

{quoting the snow-relevant part of a longer article}

SNOW AND COLD
There seems no doubt that last week the snowfall came closer to Pirie than at any time in living memory, according to scraps I picked up from "old hands." I spent some time talk- ing to this one and that, and while some could remember having stood on the waterfront and seen the white mantle on the top of Flinders Range none had heard of snow having got down as far as Napperby and Warnertown.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96254135
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9184554
APA citation
"WANDERER'S" MIRROR OF THE YEARS. (1951, July 23). Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved June 13, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96254135

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Tuesday 24 July 1951 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/45726684

{quote of entire article]

Two Pages Of Snow Pictures
Last week's heavy fall of snow in South Australia is still a topic of conversation. A photographer visited the Mount Lofty Ranges at the height of the fall and took a series of pictures for "The Chronicle." These will fill two pages in the popular illustrated weekly, which will be published on Thursday. Orders for this issue should be placed without delay.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45726684
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3198053
APA citation
Two Pages of Snow Pictures. (1951, July 24). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved June 13, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45726684

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I think the below article probably contains a substantial error when it says:
"The snow in this town and district which fell on Wednesday and Thursday of last week must have run the 1901 issue rather closely. It set in fairly early on Wednesday morning mantling the house roofs and surrounding hills with white. It continued intermittently throughout the day and night and the place was still snow-covered on Thursday. Snow fell again early on Friday morning" {end of quote}. Most other reports describe the snow as starting fairly early on Thursday morning, with the two snow days being Thursday and Friday.

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Tuesday 24 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37319194

{quoting entire article}

SNOWED FOR THREE DAYS
The nine days or so up to Sunday was possibly the worst cold period Burra and district has experienced for 50 years. Coincidentally enough, 50 years ago, the year of founding of Federation, Burra had the heaviest fall of snow it has ever experienced. The snow in this town and district which fell on Wednesday and Thursday of last week must have run the 1901 issue rather closely. It set in fairly early on Wednesday morning mantling the house roofs and surrounding hills with white. It continued intermittently throughout the day and night and the place was still snow-covered on Thursday. Snow fell again early on Friday morning. That day it still fell occasionally into the night. There was a severe hailstorm during the afternoon. Intermittent rain helped to wash the snow away and it never attained any great depth. One resident living near Mongolata says that he has never seen Mount Bryan proper "so white" Even the trees on that mount were snow-covered and did not stand out blackly. When the "thaw" came creeks which were flowing freely ran bankers, becoming rushing torrents in the process. The whole district was covered with water. Roads stood up to the strain well and except where new work was in progress no reports of cars becoming bogged down have been received.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37319194
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4748731
APA citation
SNOWED FOR THREE DAYS. (1951, July 24). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 13, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37319194

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Wednesday 25 July 1951 Page 9.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97837216

[quoting the snow-relevant part of a longer article}

Snow.—Last Thursday great excitement prevailed in these parts. At 7 a.m. snow fell, making Mt. Horrocks look like a picture card scene. Cows did nt seem to appreciate the soft down on their backs. During the day quite a lot of hail- stones fei- — nothing like a little variety. At 10.15 p.m. the sight was worth seeing. Roofs were mantled in snow and the school garden cabbages put on the appearance of caulihowers. Electric light poles' coatings were ennanced with the street lights shining on them. A search lignt was set going and the wnole town seemed like fairy land. Snowmen were made and were still intact the next morning. Some became rather wet witn snowball throwing. Altogether quite an unusual day.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97837216
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9628308
APA citation
WATERVALE Notes. (1951, July 25). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved June 13, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97837216

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Wednesday 25 July 1951 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97837249

{quoting snow-relevant part of longer article}

Hoyleton Has Snow—Last Thursday Snow fell at Hoyleton. It could be seen falling all down along the range. At Hughes Park Estate it was fallin for quite a while, and the young folk amused themselves making snow men.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97837249
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9628306
APA citation
MATCHES AND UMPIRES FOR SATURDAY. (1951, July 25). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved June 14, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97837249

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Wednesday 25 July 1951 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97837187

{quoting snow-relevant part of longer article}

Mintaro Snowfalls—Mintaro shared in the Mid-North issue of hail, sleet and snow, last week, and on Wednesday night about 7.30 a particularly heavy fall transformed it into a veritable Fairyland. In the moonlight it was a lovely sight.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97837187
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9628303
APA citation
MINTARO. (1951, July 25). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved June 14, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97837187

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Wednesday 25 July 1951 Page 8.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97837217

{quoting entire article}

Snow! Snow! Snow!

EQUALS SNOW FALLS OF 1901 and 1917.

[By the Editor.]

LAST THURSDAY, July 19, Falls of Snow in many parts of South Australia, formed part of an Iceberg and Snowfall over vast areas of the Southern Continent from Sydney to the Western Australian border. In common with many other places, Clare, Mid-North, and Northern areas, were mantles of white at varying times on Thursday and Friday. Biting winds, hail, sleet and snow fell on the mountain ranges of the Middle, Upper North and Lower North, Adelaide hills and in South East localities. Here at Clare—snow on two nights following broke all records. The falls in the early hours of Friday, July 20, saw fields of snowy white at Armagh and along the foothills of Spring Gully. Spalding railway line from Andrews, Hilltown, Barinia, White Hut, Spring Farm proved attractive to sightseers on the Spalding—Clare—Riverton rail bus. Sevenhill and Penwortham had fairly big falls and a snowman at Sevenhill Post Office caused excitement amongst local inhabitants and school children. Mt. Horrocks wore a white mantle. At Mintaro and along the ranges, the snowflakes fell thickly to make a white carpet. Mount Rufus was snow-capped until the week-end. Mount Ogden, behind Penwortham, also wore a mantle of white. Watervale, too, had its quota of hail and snow plus snowfights

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97837217
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9628307
APA citation
Snow! Snow! Snow!. (1951, July 25). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved June 14, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97837217

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Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Thursday 26 July 1951 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93859907

{quoting entire article}

Heavy Snowfalls Attract Thousands To Hills

The heaviest snowfalls in memory covered large areas of the State last Thursday and Friday, giving the Adelaide Hills in particular a "Dickens Christmas" appearance. Thousands of hills sightseers marvelled at the rare sight.
Falls of from a quarter of an inch to two inches were recorded in the Middle and Upper North, on Eyre Peninsula, throughout the Mount Lofty Ranges and in southern districts. When snow was falling in the Adelaide Hills on Thursday, Adelaide experienced at 10 p.m. its lowest July temperature for six years 36.6 deg.
Light show also fell for the first time for 35 years in southern south-eastern and eastern suburbs on Thursday.
Hills telephone exchanges were jammed with.calls from the city and in some in stances extra staff was rushed into service.
West Coast falls were light, but in the north and Adelaide Hills snow fell intermittently throughout the day.
During the afternoon snow along the crests of the ranges and in the foothills was visible from the city and office roof tops were dotted with sightseers.
Hills farmers said that no lamb losses of any consequence were expected as a result of the snow.
On Thursday snow fell at Golden Grove for 20 minutes for the first time in living memory, but it soon melted.
Mr. E. M. Jenkins, of Terowie, said he had never seen a day like Thursday during his 77 years in the district.
The chairman of the Caltowie District Council (Mr. M. Holland) said the snow was the heaviest recorded since 1889.
Mount Remarkable in the Flinders Ranges was snowcapped and drifts filled the valleys to a depth of eight inches.
Falls were reported from the Bundaleer and Canowie Hills, Peterborough, Jamestown and Clare.
Broken Hill saw its first snow on Friday. It arrived on open trucks from Peterborough and was used by railways employes for a snow fight.
Polar air, besides bringing widespread snow, had helped wheat crops and pastures by checking their advanced growth, Mr. R. L. Griffiths, SA Senior Agricultural Adviser, said. Many farmers had feared their wheat and pastures would grow tall and rank, he added, but the cold snap had reduced soil temperatures.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93859907
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8687606
APA citation
Heavy Snowfalls Attract Thousands To Hills. (1951, July 26). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved June 14, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93859907

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Bunyip (Gawler, SA : 1863 - 1954) Friday 27 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96860744

Quoting all of the article text, which is accompanied by photos not shown below but they can be seen in very low quality at the above link.

DISTRICT SNOW SCENES. Pictures taken near Pewsey Vale a few miles East of Lyndoch, early Friday morning show (top)—the roadway leading to Pewsey Vale homestead. Snow covers the landscape and is heavily piled on grass at the right-hand side of the track ; (bottom)—completely covered hillside near Pewsey Vale road gateway. First falls were on Thursday afternoon of last week and continued in the moonlight that night. Before the snow began to melt about 8.30 a.m. Friday a thick layer covered the countryside.
HEAVY FALL AT WILLIAMSTOWN.
Car-loads visited Williamstown hills areas where the sight was spectacular. Snow was still to be seen on Friday morning on the hills and in the town. Visitors enjoyed the fun of snowball fights. The fall in this area was the heaviest for 50 years, and even late on Friday morning could be seen in the distance from higher points of Willaston.
AT ONE TREE HILL
In the One Tree Hill area snow flakes began falling about 3.30 p.m. on the Thursday—described as glorious flower petals floating down. Again at night falls were reported, those South and South East of the township being heavier. One district resident of 80 years standing could not recall a previous snowfall.
Children of One Tree Hill school returning home in the afternoon built a snowman over 2-feet high and enjoyed their first snow fight.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96860744
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9527691
APA citation
No title. (1951, July 27). Bunyip (Gawler, SA : 1863 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 15, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96860744

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The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 28 July 1951 Page 7 S.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55785683

Quoting a relevant snippet from a longer article. According to Wikipedia Buckleboo is 35 km northwest of Kimba on Eyre Peninsula.

"... a friend rang up from the Weather Bureau last week with the information that there had been snow at Buckleboo."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55785683
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4655703
APA citation
Going Your Way FROST. (1951, July 28). The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954), p. 7 Supplement: SUNDAY MAGAZINE. Retrieved June 15, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55785683

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Thursday 26 July 1951 Page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147884817

{quoting the whole article}

At Summertown
Thursday's snowfall was considered by the older residents as the most spectacular the district has ever known. Commencing in mid-afternoon with a fall that soon whitened the landscape it was followed by falls in the evening which covered everything with a mantle of white, inches deep. Traffic on the Greenhill road became very heavy as city folk made their way to the snow-capped hills. The scene in the moonlight was entrancing, and when morning dawned the earth was still clothed in white. Sightseers were abroad at break of day and continued all the morning, cars, buses and taxis all carrying full loads. There were a few light falls on Friday morning but by mid-day all had melted except in sheltered spots where it remained throughout the day. Snowballing and the building of snow-men proved a popular pastime for many.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147884817
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17358717
APA citation
At Sannnertown. (1951, July 26). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved June 18, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147884817

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Thursday 26 July 1951 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147884785

{quoting snow-relevant parts of longer article}

Lobethal Agric'l Bureau

Despite snow and very inclement weather the Lobethal branch of the Agricultural Bu- reau held their annual smoke social on Thursday last which was well attended.

An excellent supper was served by the ladies branch and those homeward bound after saw a glorious sight in the moonlight which revealed the countryside covered with snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147884785
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17358713
APA citation
Lobethal Agric'l Bureau. (1951, July 26). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved June 17, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147884785

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Thursday 26 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147884810

{quoting entire article}

Cherryville News

WEATHER

Following several days of severe rain and cold last week Cherryville had its fair share of hail and snow on the Thursday afternoon. Snow fell in a heavy storm for a considerable time and settled on the hillsides and trees around the Marble Hill residence, making a very beautiful sight. More snow fell during the night and was lying thickly carpeted on the ground until the sun melted it next morning. Some children in the district had not seen snow before and were greatly excited.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147884810
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17358711
APA citation
Cherryville News. (1951, July 26). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 17, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147884810

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Thursday 26 July 1951 Page 1.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147884790

Quoting whole of article. "LAST THURSDAY AND FRIDAY" in the heading below refers to 19th and 20th July 1951.

SNOW, WIND & RAIN

FOR THE FIRST TIME FOR MANY YEARS MOST OF THE HILLS DISTRICTS TOWHSHIPS RECEIVED A COATING OF SNOW LAST THURSDAY AND FRIDAY IN ONE OF THE COLDEST WEEKS EXPERIENCED.

In the Crafers-Mt Lofty area a blanket of six inches of snow covered the ground for most of the two days, the heaviest falls occurring on Thursday evening.

For most children and many adults it was the first occasion on which they had seen snow and on Thursday afternoon when the first falls occurred school was forgotten the rest of the day.

In the Uraidla-Summertown area falls were very heavy while at Nairne the township was white on Friday morning. Windmill Hill at Mount Barker stood out white with the pine trees receiving a covering and making a picturesque sight while a white Mount Barker stood out visible from many parts of the town.

The week has been a bitter one and residents will heartily welcome the sunshine again following what has to date been a heavy rainfall and cold winter with the temperature down as low as 24 degrees.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147884790
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17358711
APA citation
SNOW, WIND & RAIN. (1951, July 26). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 17, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147884790

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The article below clearly and unambiguously says Tuesday in the Trove image of the newspaper. As light snow was reported in Mt. Gambier on Thursday I'm wondering if whoever wrote the above article incorrectly put Tuesday instead of Thursday. If I get time I'll investigate that further.


Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Thursday 19 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/78657607

{Quoting the snow-relevant part of a longer article.}

RAIN, HAIL
The 24 hours ended 8.30 a.m. today were Mount Gambier's wettest for three years. The Post Office recorded 1.78 inches. Previous wettest was April 11, 1948, when 2.26 ins. were recorded. The record for 24 hours is 3.26 ins. on February 18, 1946. Very light snowflakes, which melted before reaching the ground, were seen at Mount Gambier on Tuesday. Mount Gambier had a severe hailstorm at 7.30 a.m. today following a night of almost continuous rain. Hailstones as big as marbles and bird's eggs fell for about five minutes, piling up against walls and fences and covering the ground with a snow-like mantle. ... Heavy snow falls have been reported throughout S.A. and Victoria. Four inches of snow fell at Hallett, S.A.
Max. and Min. Temps. —
Wed. 58, 46; Today 46.5, 37.8.

{end of quote}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78657607
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7729825
APA citation
RAIN, HAIL. (1951, July 19). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 11, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78657607


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News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 19 July 1951 Page 19.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130331492

"VERY COLD —— Further showers STATE WEATHER FORECAST (issued at noon).—Further showers generally in settled areas and adjacent interiors, with hail and snow at first on highlands. Cold to very cold temperatures. Fresh to strong south-west to south winds. CITY.—Very cold with further showers. Fresh south-west to south winds, strong at times. OCEAN.—Strong southerly winds and rough seas generally southern waters, soon moderating and backing south-east west from Bight. COASTAL WATERS.—Strong south-west to south winds and rough seas."

A weather map is included in this report - go to the above link to see it.

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Port Lincoln Times (SA : 1927 - 1954) Thursday 19 July 1951 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97195879

{quoting all of article}

"Snow At Cockaleechie
Our correspondent reports that there was a light fall of snow at Cockaleechie this morn- ing. This is the first occasion on which snow is known to have fallen in this district. The minimum reading at the Port Lincoln Post Office this morning was 40 degrees."

[Cockaleechie is near Cummins on southern Eyre Peninsula.]

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97195879
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9451056
APA citation
Snow At Cockaleechie. (1951, July 19). Port Lincoln Times (SA : 1927 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97195879

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Below are screengrab images of five surface chart weather maps from the newspaper the "News" on Trove, published on the days Tuesday 17th July 1951, 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st. The Bureau's handwritten date and time on the top right-hand corner of the Saturday weather map appears to me to read Saturday July 21 1951 (5/30 ..). I can't decipher what's written in small writing after the 5/30 but it may be am. The one on the Friday map clearly reads 830 am. On the other three days the times are pretty much illegible. I'll speculate the are all dated by the Bureau in the 530 to 830 am time period or thereabouts.

So the order below is Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.











Here are the links to the weather maps on Trove if you would like to examine them in more detail:

Tuesday 17th July 1951 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130327760
Wednesday 18th
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130324245
Thursday 19th
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130331492
Friday 20th
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130328663
Saturday 21st
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/130326203

Below are the State and City (Adelaide) Bureau forecasts that accompany the five weathermaps.

Tuesday 17 July 1951
"MAINLY FINE; COLD
STATE WEATHER FORECAST (issued at noon).—Occasional light showers and morning drizzle over southern fringe of State; fine elsewhere. Cold temperatures with isolated frosts north-western half. Moderating west to south winds. CITY.—A few light showers and morning drizzle about foothills, but mainly fine. Cold temperatures. West to south-west winds."

Wednesday 18 July 1951
"WEATHER COLD, SHOWERY
STATE WEATHER FORECAST (Issued at noon).—Continued cold conditions with further drizzle and showers at first over southern half of settled areas; becoming more general on Thursday. Fine in interiors. North-west to west winds, backing west to south-west Thursday. CITY.—Cloudy and cold. Occasional showers, becoming more frequent on Thursday. North-west to south-west winds."

Thursday 19 July 1951
"VERY COLD —— Further showers
STATE WEATHER FORECAST (issued at noon).—Further showers generally in settled areas and adjacent interiors, with hail and snow at first on highlands. Cold to very cold temperatures. Fresh to strong south-west to south winds. CITY.—Very cold with further showers. Fresh south-west to south winds, strong at times."

Friday 20 July 1951
"COLD, WITH SOME RAIN
STATE WEATHER FORECAST (issued at noon).—Continuing cold to very cold condition, with occasional showers in settled areas contracting slowly eastward. Some hail and in highland districts snow at first. Moderate to fresh southerly winds, strong at times. CITY.—Continued very cold conditions with occasional showers and some hail. Fresh southerly winds, strong at times."

Saturday 21 July 1951
"COLD, WITH FEW SHOWERS
STATE WEATHER FORECAST (Issued at noon).—Occasional light showers in southern half of settled areas and along ranges of northern agricultural districts; fine elsewhere. Cold temperatures with inland frosts. Light to moderate south-west to south winds, fresh at times on south and south-east coasts. CITY.—Cold, with occasional light showers chiefly about foothills. Light to moderate south-west winds."

It's interesting that the Bureau's forecast issued at noon on Wednesday 18th does not forecast any snow for SA on Thursday the first day of the event. I suppose that without satellite images of the southern ocean there was no way anyone could know that a large mass of very cold air with the potential for snowfalls on land was heading our way, unless perhaps there were ships in the path of the cold air.

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