1919 6th-7th September widespread snowfalls.

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This was one of South Australia's really big snowfalls, and may well be among the top twenty in our recorded history.

The moon was about three-quarters full on the night of the heavy snow which added to the beauty of the snow scenes during the hours of darkness.

There is a short section on the meteorological causes of this snowfall, with two weather maps and comments from the weather bureau, further down this page.

In the State Library of South Australia there's a photo showing very impressive snow cover somewhere on Mt Lofty which I've copied here.

Now to individual reports in newspapers (source is Trove).

First up, a report from Burra.

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), Wednesday 10 September 1919, page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/39137492

{quoting entire article}

The Weather

During the past few days we have been forcibly reminded that winter is still with us. Saturday and Sunday particularly so, as during Saturday morning heavy rain set in with a keen and cutting wind, the cold being intense. Everybody forcasted a fall of snow and the forecast proved correct. Driving showers of rain fell during the afternoon, accompanied by hail, sleet and snow, and at night a bank of clouds, lying low, appeared in the south western sky. Just before midnight, the wind suddenly dropped, the rain ceased and snow began to fall in earnest, and by one o'clock the place was enveloped in a white mantle and looked a glorious sight in the moonlight. The falls during the early hours must have been very heavy, as at daylight the ground was covered to a depth of several inches. Everybody was early astir and snowballing heartily indulged in by young and old. Huge snow men were made and it was a sight not soon to be forgotten to see the young folk in the thickly falling snow, either snowballing or making huge snow men. Photographers were busy in all directions as lhe snow hung thick on trees, fences, in fact everything was weighted down with its white burden, how-ever ugly the object under ordinary circumstances, had suddenly been transformed into a thing of beauty. Many folk climbed the hills and the view from these points of vantage, especially towards Mount Bryan, was magnificent. The snow ceased to fall just before midday. Needless to say, the attendance at all the churches was very sparse, but at the same time, the behavior of the snow-ballers was never out of bounds, and very little rough play was indulged in. There was not such a list of casualties as occurred in August, 1917, probably owing to absence of hail. Rain fell again during Sunday afternoon and very soon obliterated all traces of snow on level ground. On Monday it could still be seen in the gullies and lying on the hills northward. The weather is still showery, and the rainfall to 9 o'clock Tuesday morning registered 1 inch 22 points. This is the best rain for the season and has extended well to the east. At Quondong 60 points were registered, Caroona 56, Mongolata 96, Boolcunda 1 inch, Wandillah 86, Poonunda 91, Baldina 65, Braemar 40, Kia Ora 36, Redcliffe 10.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39137492
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4759392
APA citation
The Weather (1919, September 10). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved April 10, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39137492

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Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Sat 13 Sep 1919 Page 41
REPORTS FROM THE COUNTRY

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/89160075

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

REPORTS FROM THE COUNTRY.

CHAIN OF PONDS, September 8.—We had a heavy fall of snow here on Sunday morning. The weather has been very cold and boisterous, and the best rains for this season have fallen.

EUDUNDA, September 8.—Early on Sunday morning frequent falls of snow occurred, and the hills of Point Pass, seven miles away, were covered in a mantle of white.

GEORGETOWN, September 8.—An inch and three-quarters of rain has been registered for the week-end. There was a big fall of snow on Sunday morning.

HAMMOND, September 8.—Snow and splendid soaking rains have been falling here for the past two days. The weather is intensely cold.

ORROROO, September 8.—On Sunday morning the country lay white under a mantle of snow, and the Black Rock Range, which rises sheer out of the plains, presented a fine spectacle. Many car loads braved the stormy elements to get a closer view.

TRURO. September 8. —The best rain of this season started on Saturday night. There was a light fall of snow on Saturday. The hail was very cold.

TAILEM BEND, September 8.— Rain, accompanied by hail and strong, cold winds, fell during Saturday and Sunday

TEROWIE, September 8.— There was a heavy fall of snow here about 6 a.m. yes-terday, and the country around was soon deeply covered. After breakfast the whole town was in a state of 'civil' war, old and young, male and female, being engaged in snowballing.

WILLOWIE, September 8.— On Sunday morning a snowstorm was experienced here. It lasted about an hour. About half an inch of rain has fallen, and it is still raining.

APPILA, September 7— The heaviest fall of snow witnessed here occurred this morning and continued till about half-past nine. The snow was several inches deep. Snowballing was indulged in. Showers of rain and hail fell.

EURELIA, September 8.—The rain on Saturday will benefit the crops, which have been suffering. On Sunday heavy snow fell, and all the hills were a picturesque sight.

HAMILTON, September 8.—On Sunday there was a light fall of snow.

JAMESTOWN, September 8.— Very boisterous and inclement weather was ex-perienced on Saturday. Heavy showers fell. In the evening the wind dropped and the sky cleared, but on Sunday morning there was a glorious snowfall. The landscape presented a perfect picture of pure white. Not a blade of grass or a stone was seen. The snow was from 3 to 4 inches deep on the open fields. It was banked up to a depth of 12 inches and more in places. The snow fell after the wind had ceased. Every wire and post, every rail and tree bore the signs of an English winter scene. The ground re-mained white until after 10 o clock.

MOUNT BRYAN, September 8.— Yesterday morning there was a carpet of snow everywhere. The scene was magnificent. This district is surrounded by hills, which showed the snow to perfection. Saturday was cold and windy, with heavy showers. There were slight snowstorms during Saturday afternoon, with a very heavy fall all night. Trees looked beautiful when the snow began. Mount Bryan and various other hills were swathed in white. A gentleman who has resided in this district for over 40 years stated this was the best fall he had seen. There were several heavy showers of rain and hail.

MANNANARIE, September 8.— One of the heaviest falls of snow for many years occurred yesterday. It started early in the morning and continued till 8 to 9 o'clock. In the hills the ground was covered in large patches late in the evening.

MOUNT BARKER, September 9.— A light fall of snow took place here on Sunday morning.

MONTACUTE, September 8.— Stormy weather was experienced on Saturday, with severe hailstorms. On Sunday morning there was the heaviest fall of snow that has been seen here for some years.

NARRACOORTE, September 8.— Splendid rain has fallen. On Saturday and Sunday the rain was heaviest, and there was some hail.

NAIRNE, September 8.—On Sunday there was a heavy fall of snow. The glorious rain which has fallen during the last three days will do an immense amount of good.

TOTHILL'S CREEK. September 7.— Such a snowfall as that of yesterday has not been witnessed for years. The flakes were larger than almond petals.

WIRRABARA September 8.—On Sunday morning all the high hills were touched with snow, and the rain was one of the best fails for the season.

WILLOWIE, September 7.—The rain was accompanied by the heaviest snowstorm ever known in the district. Coomooroo Hill and the Flinders Range presented a beau-tiful sight.

YONGALA, September 8.— Heavy falls of snow occurred during Saturday night and Sunday morning. The landscape was completely covered several inches deep. Snowballing was indulged in on Sunday morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article89160075
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8614068
APA citation
REPORTS FROM THE COUNTRY. (1919, September 13). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 41. Retrieved April 9, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article89160075 

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Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 8 September 1919, page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5622714

{quoting entire article}

A FALL OF SNOW
MOUNT LOFTY RANGES
COVERED.

For the first time this year snow fell at Mount Lofty during Saturday night and on Sunday morning. When the res dents rose on Sunday the landscape was dressed in a glorious mantle of white, and a magnificent spectacle was presented. It was the heaviest fall experienced in the hills for many years. The snow was four or five inches thick on the ground, and where it had drifted it was quite 1 ft. in thickness, while the foliage of the trees was thickly covered. It began to thaw when the rain fell, but three times during the morn ng there were further falls, each of which lasted for about a quarter of an hour. The western portion of the snow-clad region was clearly visible from the city, and during the day a large number of motorists and others proceeded from the city to the hills. Before noon there was a great gathering of visitors in the vicinity of the summit of Mount Lofty, where the fall seemed to have been heavier than elsewhere, and the gighteeers felt amply repaid for their cold journey by the beautiful picture the snow-covered country presented. It was a sight to be remembered. Everything was more or less clothed in pure white. The trees, shrubs, fences, buildings, and the bare land all bore the white burden, but e foliage was still visible, and the scene was picturesque beyond description. The popular amusement on such occasions— snow-balling—was freely indulged in, and every batch of new arrivals in the favored area received a snowball greeting. Some of the more energetic visitors built "snow men" on the road side. One of the figures had a pipe stuck in th- mouth, and another held a broom.

Our Norton Summit correspondent wrote on Sunday evening:—Several beautiful falls of snow took place this morning, and hills residents rose earlier than usual to enjoy the fine spectacle presented. The atmosphere was bitterly cold, but this fact did not prevent children, and older folk too, gathering snowballs. The only people in the district not interested in the snow were the returned soldiers, who were heard to declare that they had seen snow "all over the shop" during the last four years and it was no novelty. Between Norton Summit and Marble Hill the fall was very heavy, and the viceregal residence stood out on the landscape, capped with white. It is thought that the fall was too early to injure the forthcoming fruit season, for the fruit buds are scarcely in blossom yet, though the early-flowering plums are almost in full bloom.

On Sunday night our Kooringa "orrespondent telephoned:—One of the heaviest snow-storms experienced here occurred during the early hours of Sund y morning. It started between 12 and 1 o'clock and continued until midday. The hills surrounding the town were a charming sight, and snowballing was freely indulged in. A glorious rain fell during Saturday and Sunday, which will do an immense amount of good. The weather is bitterly cold.

COLDEST DAY FOR 11 YEARS.

On Sunday night Mr. Bromley reported as follows:—During Friday the advancing anti-cyclone strengthened and spread over the western, central, and eastern parts of Australia, leaving only the remnant of the monsoon off the east coast between Syd-ney and Brisbane. In the southern region of the continent, however, the Antarctic low had prevented the progress of the high in that direciton, and increasing in intensity had pushed back towards South Australia, being located on Saturday morning off our south-east coast. A steep pressure gradient was thus produced over South Australia, which resulted in a strong, cold southerly wind circulation, with unsettled and showery, weather, and although only scattered in the upper north, practically the whole of the settled areas revolved light falls of rain during the 24 hours ended 8.30 a.m. In New South Wales light to heavy rain, with thunderstorms was experienced over the. eastern half of the State, while falls in Victoria were generally light and scattered, except for heavy precipitation in the extreme east. The rainfall in Tasmania was also only light and confined to the north and western divisions. With the further increase in energy of. the Antarctic low on Saturday and Sunday, very cold and unsettled conditions prevailed in South Australia, with many snowfalls over the Mount Lofty and Flinders Ranges. The few reports to hand on Sunday show that useful falls have been recorded over the agricultural areas, the following being a list of the messages received:—Terowie, 53 points, snowfall; Burra, 36 points, snow falling at 9 a.m.; Eucla, 2 points, threatening; Adelaide, 74 points, hail; Mount Gambier. 43 points, hail reported: Cape Borda, 35 points, hail reported. Very low maximum temperatures were registered on Saturday, some stations recording readings below 50 degrees, while exceptionally cold weather was experienced at Adelaide. The highest day temperature on Saturday was 55.8 deg., while on Sunday the thermometer rose from a minimum of 39.4 deg. to a maximum of only 53.4 deg., which constitutes the coldest day for September since 1908, when the corresponding reading was 53 deg. on the 1st of the month. In addition to the 74 points registered at Adelaide at 8.30 a.m. another 16 points were gauged up to 0 p.m.. making the total since Saturday morning 98 points. This afternoon's reports show that barometers are now rising, indicating the withdrawal of the low from the State and the advance of the high. The centre of the latter system is still well to the westward, and further passing showers, with cold southerly winds, are again likely to-morrow over the settled areas, but conditions improving to the westward.

SNOWBALLING AT PETERBOROUGH.

Peterborough, September 7.
Yestejday was tfe coldest day this winter. During the night very heavy snow storms occurred, and this morning the sight was beautiful, all the houses and trees being covered with a thick mantle of snow. On the level ground the snow was 3 in. deep, and where it drifted it was piled a foot high. The Gumbowie, Mannanarie, and Coglin hills presented a lovely sight when the sun shone on them. Snowballing was general all the morning, and the children had great fun. The residents who had not seen snow before were wild with excitement at the glorious sight. It is five years since the last heavy fall. During to-day several more falls occurred, but rain set in and drove away the snow by midday. It was imposs'ble to walk in the yards or on the footpaths without sinking right over one's boots in snow. Everything was very sloppy. The moisture will save the wheat crops and feed in the district, as the prospects last week were poor, but this fall equals 2 in. of rain and all has soaked in. It materially alters the prospects and ensures hay and wheat. This means thousands of pounds to the district and the State. The weather is still bitterly cold and showery.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5622714
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page989302
APA citation
A FALL OF SNOW (1919, September 8). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved March 27, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5622714  

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Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931) Sat 13 Sep 1919 Page 30.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/165898056

{quoting entire article}

SNOW, HAIL, AND RAIN,

A biting cold wind blew up from the region of the icebergs on Saturday afternoon and at night particularly. When Sunday dawned residents of the metropolitan area witnessed the unusually fine spectacle of Mount Lofty wrapped in a mantle of snow. From the plains people could plainly discern the phenomenal white on the scattered rooftops and on the dense scrub of trees surrounding the summit of the hill. Nearly 20 years has elapsed since such a heavy fall of snow last occurred in the neighbourhood. The flakes began to descend early on Sunday morning, and con-tinued intermittently until about noon. Naturally motorists from all parts of the metropolis, suburbs, and hills made Mount Lofty their Mecca. During the morning a large crowd congregated, and as they passed through the snow-clad stretch of country, local residents, who had turned out in force hailed their arrival with a healthy volley of snowballs. Everybody indulged in the novel fun, and all appeared to enjoy the good natured pelting. A large contingent of sightseers also journeyed to the scene by train. The cold was intense, and Mounted-Constable West, who has been stationed at Stirling West for eight or nine years, and has been out in all weathers, told a representative of The Register that he had never before felt the weather so keenly as he did on Sunday. In addition to the snow, severe hailstorms passed over the plains. After a heavy fall of hailstones (which were about a quarter of an inch in diameter) had occurred during the morning, the whole countryside was white. The hail blocked the guttering in many houses, and for a while water streamed over the sides of roofs.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165898056
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19328810
APA citation
SNOW, HAIL, AND RAIN. (1919, September 13). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 30. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165898056 

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Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931) Sat 13 Sep 1919 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/165898158

{snow-relevant text quoted from longer article}

Snow in the Highlands.—

The falls of snow extended practically throughout the highlands,, and in places were unprecedentedly heavy. A message from Melrose stated: —Melrose.—Splendid rain fell during Saturday and Sun-day. Mount Remarkable was completely covered with snow yesterday, and is partially mantled to-day. Snow began to fall at 8.40 o'clock on Sunday morning, and continued for S0 minutes. The un-usual spectacle of hail, snow, and rain falling together was witnessed. The mount presents a beautiful appearance to-day. A Jamestown telegram stated:—Probably the heaviest fall of snow experienced in this district fell during. the early hours of Sunday morning. The surrounding hills and plains were perfectly white as far as the eye could see. In the park lands all vegetation was covered to a depth of 6 to 9 in. with a white mantle. The snow in the gardens and plantations and on the trees was a glorious sight. Snowballing was indulged in freely.
Mi. A. G. Rymill, of Adelaide received advice from the manager of Canowie Station stating that one and a half inches of rain had fallen, and the country was covered with snow—in places, from 6 inches to 12 inches deep. It was estimated that the fall of snow would be equal to another half inch of moisture. A telegram from Peterborough stated— Saturday was the coldest day of the winter. During the night heavy snowstorms occurred, and this morning the country was beautiful to behold, as every house and tree, and other objects was covered in a thick mantle of white. On level ground the snow was three inches deep, and where drifted it was piled a foot high. As far as the eye could see everywhere was snow. The Gumbowie, Mannanarie, and Goglin Hills presented a lovely sight when the sun was shining on them. Snowballing was general in the morning, and the children had great fun. It was five years since the last heavy fall. During to-day several more falls occurred, but rain set in, and drove the snow away, although it remained on the ground until midday. The wheat crops and feed will now be saved to the district. The prospects last week were poor, but these falls have been equal to two inches of rain, and as they all soaked in, they have materially altered the situation, which now ensures hay and wheat, and means many thousands of pounds to the district and the State. The weather is still bitterly cold and showery.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165898158
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19328785
APA citation
A GLORIOUS RAIN. CROPS IMMENSELY BENEFITED. (1919, September 13). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 5. Retrieved April 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165898158 

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Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 - 1954), Tuesday 9 September 1919, page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/95460317

{quoting snow-relevant part of longer article}

Gladstone
EXTRAORDINARY WEATHER.
HAIL, SNOW, AND RAIN.

Residents of Gladstone, particularly those who rose early, were treated to a glorious sight on Sunday morning. The ground was covered to an average depth of half an inch with snow. Roofs and trees also bore white mantles. Mount Herbert presented a fine spectacle, as did the Bundaleer Hills. Snow began to fall about a quarter past twelve on Sunday morning, fell again about three o'clock, at six o'clock, and again on Sunday afternoon at 2.15.

On Saturday night, at half past 8, there was a heavy fall of hail. Hail also fell during Sunday morning. The total fall till nine o'clock yesterday morning was 108 points. That added to the 27 points of a week ago, has settled all anxiety regarding crops and summer feed.

On Sunday morning snowballing was indulged in. One resident made a miniature snow man, and stuck it on the gatepost in front of the house in evidence of the intense cold. It was practically intact early yesterday morning. The weather is still dull, and further showers are likely.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95460317
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9216934
APA citation
Gladstone (1919, September 9). Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95460317 

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Quorn Mercury (SA : 1895 - 1954), Friday 12 September 1919, page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/212991151

{quoting snow-relevant part of longer article}

DUST, RAIN, AND SNOW.
ORROROO.

The advent of Spring has brought along a mixture in weather. Early last week 30 points of rain made all hands hopeful; local weather prophets were confident that more was to follow, and on Saturday morning a heavy wind sent clouds of dust hurtling through the town. The races in connection with the Hospital were due to commence at 1.30 p.m. In the dust, ladies found their way to the course to prepare the luncheon booth. but at noon heavy black clouds enveloped the town, and the downpour commenced in earnest. Races were postponed, and the town took on a deserted appearance. At intervals through the afternoon and night rain fell, and snow made its appearance in the early hours of Sunday morning, and continued to fall until 9 a.m. The Bald Hill, at the rear of the town, looked well in its white mantle, but the Black Rock hills, away to the east, presented a grand picture, every point showing up boldly in its snowy garb, while crevices and gullies showed up with sombre colour the brilliant and fleecy white. At breakfast hour snow was still falling, and under its mantle the town seemed devoid of life, except for the myriad wreaths of curling smoke, which spoke of cozy fires. Snow and sleet was king outside, and nobody cared. Later in the day parties braved the cold winds to get a closer view of the Black Rock hills. Up to 9 a.m. on Monday morning 62 points were registered, making 91 points for the week, and 149 for the month.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article212991151
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page23857262
APA citation
DUST, RAIN, AND SNOW. (1919, September 12). Quorn Mercury (SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved April 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article212991151 

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), Friday 12 September 1919, page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/108285427

{quoting snow-relevant part of longer article}

Kapunda Herald
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY MORNING.
Kapunda : Sept. 12, 1919.
News of the Week.

A few snow flakes were seen in Kapunda, but at Eudunda and Tothill's Creek and along the ranges to the east the fall was much heavier.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108285427
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10561769
APA citation
Kapunda Herald (1919, September 12). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 2. Retrieved April 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108285427 

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Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), Saturday 13 September 1919, page 28.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/165898076

[This is a photograph taken on Sunday 7th September 1919, which is reproduced, along with the text below it, in the article on Trove using a technique suited to reproducing text and not photos. - Miles]



BEAUTIFUL SNOW.
The drought broke on Saturday, September 6, and Sunday was the coldest day in September since 1908. Rain, ha.I, and snow fell throughout the country. At Mount Lofty the mantle of white was the heaviest for nearly 20 years. Our photograph shows a scene near the summit of Mount Lofty on Sunday.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165898076
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19328808
APA citation
BEAUTIFUL SNOW. (1919, September 13). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 28. Retrieved April 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165898076  

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Below is a copy of the same photo (perhaps an original print from the negative) in the State Library of South Australia, along with accompanying text.



Above photo: Walkers enjoying snow in the Mount Lofty Ranges, South Australia
A group of adults and a child enjoying recent snow in the Mount Lofty Ranges, South Australia, on Sunday 7 September 1919.
DATE 1919
Source: State Library of South Australia, Pictorial Collection PRG 280/1/15/419
Image page: http://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/PRG+280/1/15/419

Permanent Link: http://www.catalog.slsa.sa.gov.au:80/record=b2136167~S3

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Laura Standard and Crystal Brook Courier (SA : 1917 - 1948), Friday 12 September 1919, page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/188777761

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

(entirely uncorrected copy of Trove's digital text version of the newspaper article}

SNOW AT LAURA.

Residents of Laura who were early risers on Sunday were privileged to see a sight which well repaid them for their effort — namely, that of seeing the Beetaloo Hills, the hills to the east, and Mount Herbert, to the sout'.i of the town, mantled with snow. Never in the memory of the oldest inhabitant of the district has such a fine sight been witnessed here, and to Young Australia in particular what is a novel experience. A very cold snap set in on Saturday afternoon, which was followed bv a hailstorm during the evening, but the sight which was presented during: the early hours of Sunday morning1 was 'a. surprise to everybody who witnessed it. From information received, the fall took place between the hours of six and eight o'clock, and a good deal of excitement was created as the news circulated that snow had fallen and could be seen on the hillf. Snowballing and the making of snow men were inulged in, and in sheltered places hailstones were to be found till late .in the afternoon. Between Saturday, 9 a.m., and Sunday. 9 a.m., 55 points of rain were registered as having fallen at the local post office. This was Followed by further showers on Sunday, making the total for 43 hours 72 points.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article188777761
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page21236026
APA citation
SNOW AT LAURA. (1919, September 12). Laura Standard and Crystal Brook Courier (SA : 1917 - 1948), p. 3. Retrieved April 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article188777761 

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Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 - 1954), Monday 8 September 1919, page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/95460206

JAMESTOWN'S WHITE CLOAK.
HEAVY FALL OF SNOW.

{quoting whole article}

Yesterday afternoon ''The Recorder" correspondent at Jamestown reported that the district was white. Snow began to fall about 5 o'clock in the morning and by seven o'clock it had covered the ground to a depth of several inches. Trees, roofs, and all other things were hidden. It was the heaviest fall on record.
During the day the young people turned out in force to celebrate the occasion. Snowmen were made and snowballing was indulged in by everyone. Nobody resented the sudden impact of a cold, v et lump under the ear, until the moisture began to trickle down the skin and it was too late to stop it. Some ejaculations then told of tender natures in trouble, but the anger soon evaporated in a fit of emulation from which someone else suffered. There was any amount of excitement and by the time the games were finished the enjoyment had become general.
Heavy rain fell during the day and about an inch was registered. The fall makes the crops in the district safe for the season.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95460206
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9216928
APA citation
JAMESTOWN'S WHITE CLOAK. (1919, September 8). Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved April 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article95460206 

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Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Tuesday 9 September 1919, page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/210600505

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

RAIN IN THE COUNTRY.

MONTACUTE, September 8.—Stormy weather was experienced on Saturday, with severe hailstorms. On Sunday morning there was the heaviest fall of snow that has been seen here for some years.

Snow at Mount Barker.
MOUNT BARKER, September 9.—A light fall of snow took place here on Sunday morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article210600505
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page23142157
APA citation
RAIN IN THE COUNTRY. (1919, September 9). The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), p. 1 (5 O'CLOCK EDITION.). Retrieved April 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article210600505 

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Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), Saturday 13 September 1919, page 13.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/165898452

{snow-relevant text copied from longer article}

RAIN IN THE COUNTRY.

The following additional reports concerning the recent splendid rain have been received from country correspondents of The Register:—

NARRACOORTE.—We have had a splendid rain, which will benefit the country considerably. Since Friday 0.69 has fallen, and since the beginning of the month we have had 1.18. The winter rains have been scanty, and a wet spring will suit this district well. [No mention of snow in Narracoorte report - Miles]
NAIRNE.—Saturday was the coldest day for the winter. Rain fell incessantly, with thunder, lightning, and severe hailstorms. On Sunday morning a heavy fall of snow extended over half an hour. A magnificent sight was presented. The glorious rains will do an immense amount of good.
MANNANARIE.—Splendid ains have fallen, and during the last two days more than 1.00 has been registered. The moisture will be of inestimable good to the farmers. Heavy snow fell on Saturday night, and all day yesterday the hills were a magnificent sight.
YONGALA.—Heavy falls of snow occurred during Saturday night and Sunday morning. The landscape was completely covered several inches deep. Snowballing was indulged in during Synday morning.
APPILA.—A heavy fall of snow occurred during the early hours of Sunday morning, and flakes continued to fall until about half past nine. The surroundings presented a beautiful sight. The snow was several inches deep. Snowballing was indulged in. Later in the day heavy showers of hail and rain fell.
GREENOCK.— Splendid soaking rains fell during Saturday and Sunday, including hall, and in some localities a little snow.
WIRRABARA.—On Saturday morning a good steady, soaking rain set in, and continued throughout the day. On Sunday morning persons early abroad witnessed a good fall of snow, and snowballing was indulged in. The hills around presented a pretty sight while covered with snow.
CARRIETON.—On Sunday hail, frost, and snow were experienced here.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165898452
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19328793
APA citation
RAIN IN THE COUNTRY. (1919, September 13). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 13. Retrieved April 8, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165898452 

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Did any snow fall in the South-East?

As always, we can only say it snowed in a location, district or region if we find a report indicating that snow fell. If we don't find a report of snow we can't say for sure it didn't snow.

I didn't find any mention of snow falling in the South-East during the passage of this weather system. Below are comments on the weather presumably around Mt Gambier on Saturday and Sunday, in the Border Watch based in Mt Gambier, and if snow fell in Mt Gambier or perhaps even in the South-East more generally and came to the attention of this newspaper it likely would have been mentioned in this article.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), Tuesday 9 September 1919, page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/77753181

{quoting mostly uncorrected nosnow-relevant text from longer article}

Severe Weather.-'Whether it; was that the equinoctial gales were some what premature" in thjir visit or not the weather: here on Satan day and Sunday was stormy and wintry in the extreme. It was delightfully pleasant and spring-like on Saturday till 12 o'clock, and then nan set in-from the north-w.eat, with ";a strong wind, and, continued;' almost'continuously all .the' afternqori and late into the night. Sun day Was still more"inclement, and, if anything, still colder, the wind being over the icefields of the south. There were some light showers in the fore noon, but in the. afternoon there was a steady fall of rain until 9 or 10 o'clock. On Sunday the cold was greater than for some years. In the morning there were two or-three heavy stiowers of hail, . but no snow.

In another newspaper a report from Narracoorte (now Naracoorte) says: "NARRACOORTE, September 8.— Splendid rain has fallen. On Saturday and Sunday the rain was heaviest, and there was some hail."

Meteorological causes of this snowfall.

Below are weather maps (surface charts) dated 6th and 8th September 1919, from The Advertiser. Some snow showers were reported on Saturday 6th and the bulk of the snow fell on Sunday morning. I don't know at what time of the days these particular maps were issued by the weather bureau, but a routine time for issuing weather maps was around 830am or 900 am. It was probably still the custom of the time not to issue a weather map on Sundays and I didn't find any weather map for Sunday 7th.





The following detailed report from Mr. Bromley of the weather bureau was published in The Advertiser on Monday 8th.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 8 September 1919, page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5622714 

On Sunday night Mr. Bromley reported as follows:—During Friday the advancing anti-cyclone strengthened and spread over the western, central, and eastern parts of Australia, leaving only the remnant of the monsoon off the east coast between Syd-ney and Brisbane. In the southern region of the continent, however, the Antarctic low had prevented the progress of the high in that direciton, and increasing in intensity had pushed back towards South Australia, being located on Saturday morning off our south-east coast. A steep pressure gradient was thus produced over South Australia, which resulted in a strong, cold southerly wind circulation, with unsettled and showery, weather, and although only scattered in the upper north, practically the whole of the settled areas revolved light falls of rain during the 24 hours ended 8.30 a.m. In New South Wales light to heavy rain, with thunderstorms was experienced over the. eastern half of the State, while falls in Victoria were generally light and scattered, except for heavy precipitation in the extreme east. The rainfall in Tasmania was also only light and confined to the north and western divisions. With the further increase in energy of. the Antarctic low on Saturday and Sunday, very cold and unsettled conditions prevailed in South Australia, with many snowfalls over the Mount Lofty and Flinders Ranges. The few reports to hand on Sunday show that useful falls have been recorded over the agricultural areas, the following being a list of the messages received:—Terowie, 53 points, snowfall; Burra, 36 points, snow falling at 9 a.m.; Eucla, 2 points, threatening; Adelaide, 74 points, hail; Mount Gambier. 43 points, hail reported: Cape Borda, 35 points, hail reported. Very low maximum temperatures were registered on Saturday, some stations recording readings below 50 degrees, while exceptionally cold weather was experienced at Adelaide. The highest day temperature on Saturday was 55.8 deg., while on Sunday the thermometer rose from a minimum of 39.4 deg. to a maximum of only 53.4 deg., which constitutes the coldest day for September since 1908, when the corresponding reading was 53 deg. on the 1st of the month. In addition to the 74 points registered at Adelaide at 8.30 a.m. another 16 points were gauged up to 0 p.m.. making the total since Saturday morning 98 points. This afternoon's reports show that barometers are now rising, indicating the withdrawal of the low from the State and the advance of the high. The centre of the latter system is still well to the westward, and further passing showers, with cold southerly winds, are again likely to-morrow over the settled areas, but conditions improving to the westward.

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"Snow Trails" - comparisons made in reports with one or more past falls.

I red through the reports on this page and copied all comments I found where there was a comparison made between the present snowfall and a past snowfall. In most instances we don't know who made the comparison or how reliable their memory was for past weather events.

APPILA, September 7— The heaviest fall of snow witnessed here occurred this morning ...

MOUNT BRYAN, September 8.— ... A gentleman who has resided in this district for over 40 years stated this was the best fall he had seen.

MANNANARIE, September 8.— One of the heaviest falls of snow for many years occurred yesterday.

MONTACUTE, September 8.— ... On Sunday morning there was the heaviest fall of snow that has been seen here for some years.

TOTHILL'S CREEK. September 7.— Such a snowfall as that of yesterday has not been witnessed for years.

WILLOWIE, September 7.—The rain was accompanied by the heaviest snowstorm ever known in the district.

For the first time this year snow fell at Mount Lofty ... . It was the heaviest fall experienced in the hills for many years. ...

On Sunday night our Kooringa [part of Burra - Miles] "orrespondent telephoned:—One of the heaviest snow-storms experienced here occurred during the early hours of Sund y morning.

Peterborough, September 7. ... It is five years since the last heavy fall.

When Sunday dawned residents of the metropolitan area witnessed the unusually fine spectacle of Mount Lofty wrapped in a mantle of snow. From the plains people could plainly discern the phenomenal white on the scattered rooftops and on the dense scrub of trees surrounding the summit of the hill. Nearly 20 years has elapsed since such a heavy fall of snow last occurred in the neighbourhood.

Snow in the Highlands.— ... The falls of snow extended practically throughout the highlands,, and in places were unprecedentedly heavy.

A Jamestown telegram stated:—Probably the heaviest fall of snow experienced in this district fell during. the early hours of Sunday morning. The surrounding hills and plains were perfectly white as far as the eye could see.
... It was five years since the last heavy fall.

Residents of Laura who were early risers on Sunday were privileged to see a sight which well repaid them for their effort — namely, that of seeing the Beetaloo Hills, the hills to the east, and Mount Herbert, to the sout'.i of the town, mantled with snow. Never in the memory of the oldest inhabitant of the district has such a fine sight been witnessed here ...

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End of report.

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