Back to home page

1911 Snowfalls Reported in the SA Newspapers (source Trove).

I found one snowfall event for the year 1911 when I searched the South Australian newspapers on the Trove database. This was on the morning of 15th September.

I also found reports of an unusually prolonged and heavy hailstorm that fell locally from one or more thunderstorms in the southern Mt Lofty Ranges on 22nd August. One of the reports says: "O'HALLORAN HILL, August 22.—A peculiar hailstorm occurred at midday, lasting over an hour. The surrounding hills appeared as if draped with a mantle of snow. The hail was lying many inches thick for hours. This is the record hailstorm in this district for over 40 years." I haven't investigated the meteorology of this event but I've included three newspaper reports and a weather map here.

1911 snowfall morning of 15th September: reports from Mid-North, Southern Flinders Ranges, Southern Mt Lofty Ranges.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 6

On Friday morning 15th September scattered locations in the Mid-North reported one or more showers of snow, and a few included reports of snow cover seen from a distance on hills. In the southern Flinders Ranges there were reports of  snow seen on Mt Remarkable. In the southern Mt Lofty Ranges a few locations reported snow shower(s), with a light cover reported on Mt Lofty till shortly after dawn. I didn't see any reports of snow from the South-East.

Scattered locations reported hail showers or hail in showers. I don't recall any report mentioning snow seen from a distance on hills or Mt Remarkable questioning whether hail might have been a promient part of the mix. One report referred to snow falling on Thursday night and Friday morning but I think it most probably wasn't referring specifically to "before midnight" but to "the dark hours".

Primary causes: A vigorous south-west to southerly airstream from the Southern Ocean (probably with a long southerly fetch) flowing over southern South Australia, between a strong high centred in the western Bight and a deep low east of Tasmania.

Below: The weather map from The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Sat 16 Sep 1911 Page 20 for 8.30am 15th September 1911. This is presumably a copy of the weather bureau's official weather map issued at 830am. It's a typical surface chart for snow events in southern South Australia in winter-spring.



Below: September 1911 calendar from timeanddate.com.



Below is a summary of the specific locations where snow was reported, in the form of quotes from the newspaper articles I found on Trove.

"The fall on Mount Lofty continued for about 25 minutes, with the result that the ground and foliage of the trees were covered with a beautiful white mantle. The fall was not heavy, and the snow disappeared shortly after sunrise."

"PETERSBURG, September 15.— Last evening heavy rain began at 5, and lasted throughout the greater part of the night. Snow fell heavily about 4 a.m., and at 6 a torrential downpour took place, accompanied by sleet and strong winds. The rain abated about 9 a.m."

"Advices from Petersburg state that snow fell there for 20 minutes, and there were also falls at Yongala, Eurelia, Carrieton, and Burra. A telegram from Melrose stated that fresh snow was lying on Mount Remarkable early in the morning, and other reports show that the snowstorm extended as far north as Orroroo."

"OODLAWIRRA, September 15.— ... At 5.30 a.m. to-day a fall of snow took place."

"Houghton, September 14. [very likely the date was 15th and 14 was an error by the correspondent or the typesetter - Miles]—At an early hour this morning the village was covered with hailstones as the result of the previous night's storm. The aspect was very beautiful. About 7 o'clock light showers of snow fell."

"Belair, September 15. Heavy rain accompanied by boisterous wind was experienced here last night. Thi morning a fall of snow occurred."

"Black Rock, September 15. ... A sudden cool change blew up from the south last night, with a few showers of rain, and a fall of sleety snow was experienced this morning."
"Snow fell at Tarcowie."

"This was from Belair:— “During the night exceptionally cold, wintry weather was experienced. At 7 o'clock this morning there was a fall of snow, which lasted about 15 minutes.” A message from Booleroo Centre stated:—“Winter and summer in one. Snow, in gullies and on Mount Remarkable.” Morchard intimated: — “A fairly heavy fall of snow was witnessed here. The Coomoroo Hills are white. The weather has been stormy, with a little rain.” Tarcowie's visitation consisted of “Forty points of rain, snow, and wind.” “At Mount Lofty,” telephoned a resident, “snow fell for a considerable time, and covered the landscape with a light, soft mantle of white.” A report from Houghton stated:— “During the night extraordinary showers of hailstones pelted down, and at dawn were followed by several falls of snow."
"Hornsdale, Chain of Ponds, Auburn, Burra, Terowie, Hallet, and Blackrock correspondents also reported falls of snow. At Terowie the white covering was 6 in. deep in places."

"Mt. Remarkable was this morning capped with snow"

MELROSE, September 15 It commenced to rain about 10 o'clock last night. Hail and sleet fell early this morning. The top of Mount Remarkable was white for some hours.

Burra or Burra and surrounds "... experienced a rather cold time on Friday morning [15th - Miles], when hail and snow fell, and the wind, extraordinary cold, blew from the south."

"TARCOWIE ... on Friday morning [15th - Miles] the hills around Tarcowie were capped with snow. A few flakes fell in the town ... ."

TEROWIE. September 15—The Broken Hill express came in to Terowie to-day covered with snow. It was bitterly cold with a strong southerly wind.

"BELALIE NORTH. September 18.—This morning snow fell verv thickly. The snow lay on Mount Lock and other hills till about 10 o'clock." [I think it very likely that the date 18 should be 15, and that 18 rather than 15 was an error by the correspondent or a rare typesetting error by the newspaper. I found no other record of snow on 18th. - Miles]

STOCKWELL, September 16. On Friday morning snow was noticed to fall, and farther east it was reported to have been quite heavy.

"URAIDLA, ... On Friday morning last there was a slight all of snow in these parts ... ."

End of summary of locations where snow was reported.

Now to individual reports from the newspapers on Trove.

Firstly I suggest a caution relating to the The Advertiser article immediately below. Maybe most of it melted before daylight, but I've seen no evidence to justify the claim in the article headline below: "MOUNT LOFTY RANGES COVERED". I've not red any reports suggesting a widespread snow cover on the Mt Lofty Ranges. "Mount Lofty Covered" or "Local snow cover on Mt Lofty Ranges" may have been within acceptable bounds based on the reports I found on Trove.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 16 September 1911, page 19
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5312892

{quoting whole article}

RAIN AND SNOW.
MOUNT LOFTY RANGES COVERED.
BEAUTIFUL WHITE MANTLE.

The boisterous winds on Friday night brought refreshing rains to the whole of the agricultural districts of the State. The night was bitterly cold in the city, and in many parts of the Mount Lofty Ranges and northern highlands falls of snow occurred early in the morning. The fall on Mount Lofty continued for about 25 minutes, with the result that the ground and foliage of the trees were covered with a beautiful white mantle. The fall was not heavy, and the snow disappeared shortly after sunrise. While it lasted, however, it was a delightful sight and residents in the hills rose early to get a glimpse of it.

Advices from Petersburg state that snow fell there for 20 minutes, and there were also falls at Yongala, Eurelia, Carrieton, and Burra. A telegram from Melrose stated that fresh snow was lying on Mount Remarkable early in the morning, and other reports show that the snowstorm extended as far north as Orroroo. In all cases it was accompanied by cold light rain and at many stations hail also fell.

Mr. F. Bromley, of the Meteorologist's Department, reported at noon:—"The low pressure waves which lately have been rapidly traversing the Southern Ocean combined yesterday off Tasmania into one large Antarctic disturbance. At the same time an energetic anti-cyclone moved in rapidly over Western Australia, thus causing steep barometric gradients between the two systems. As the result of this difference in atmospheric pressure, very strong cold and squally west and south winds have been and are still being experienced over the whole of south-eastern Australia. The cold winds which swept South Australia brought extremely opportune rain over the whole of the agricultural areas. This morning s weather bulletin shows that the falls, which extend south from Blinman, have been light to moderate, but on the whole uniform in character. Nearly every station registered over a quarter of an inch. The heaviest falls, as usual, were recorded over the Mount Lofty Ranges, where many stations received about three-quarters of an inch, the maximum having been 0.80 at Meadows. Other useful falls of over half an inch were gauged at the following places:—Farrell's Flat, 0.62; Tanunda, 0.60; Kapunda, 0.56; Manoora, 0.55; Warooka, 0.53; and Mount Gambier, 064. Fierce squalls with hail fell over the city early this morning, and the wind about 6 o'clock reached a velocity of 50 miles an hour. The gales and hailstorms were not confined to the city. Many country stations recorded this phenomenon while several in the northern highlands and along the Mount Lofty ranges reported light falls of snow. The temperature in the air at Stirling West dropped to 24 deg—8 deg. below freezing. It's worthy of note that this is the first tim snow has fallen this year. Although this is rather late falls of snow have been previously known even in October. This morning's weather chart indicates that the cold rain storm now lies off the south-east coast of the continent, and the large anti-cyclone is rapidly moving over toward this State. Under these conditions further showers may be expected to-night, but the weather will quickly moderate, and finer conditions will prevail to-morrow."

The 9 p.m. report stated:—"Further useful falls of rain were registered over the southern agricultural districts, and up to 3 p.m. Clare reported the maximum of 15 points. Barometers are rising rapidly, indicating the advance of a large anticyclone from the west, so that we may expect the weather to improve generally, although there may be a few showers at first, chiefly confined to the extreme south and south-eastern districts."

Houghton, September 14. [very likely the date was 15th and 14 was an error by the correspondent or the typesetter - Miles]—At an early hour this morning the village was covered with hailstones as the result of the previous night's storm. The aspect was very beautiful. About 7 o'clock light showers of snow fell. It is anticipated that the fruit crop will be much diminished as the result of the recent hailstorms. This is a pity, as every-body was looking forward to a bumper harvest in almost every department in the fruit industry.

Belair, September 15.
Heavy rain accompanied by boisterous wind was experienced here last night. Thi morning a fall of snow occurred.

Mount Gambier, September 15.
The rain will do an immense amount of good, and the crops are coming on nicely.

SNOW AT BLACK ROCK.
Black Rock, September 15.
All vegetation has been burnt off rapidly by the late hot weather, and the paddocks are looking white with the seeds of wild oats and barley grass. A sudden cool change blew up from the south last night, with a few showers of rain, and a fall of sleety snow was experienced this morning. The uncommon sight attracted considerable attention. The showers will do an immense amount of good, but there is no hope of anything like a good season unless inches more rain follow very shortly.

Messrs. Dalgety & Company have received the following telegram from Jamestown:—"Forty points of rain fell here last night. Snow fell at Tarcowie." Wilmington reported 42 points.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5312892
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page948693
APA citation
RAIN AND SNOW. (1911, September 16). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 19. Retrieved March 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5312892 

*********************************************************

This article also includes the above commentary from Mr. F. Bromley of the Meteorologist's Department, but does contain some additional information relating to where snow was reported.

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Saturday 16 September 1911, page 15.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/59222759

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

SUMMER-WINTER.
Quick Changes.
Another Good Agricultural Rain.
... .
—How It Happened.— A reporter waited upon the Divisional Meteorological Officer (Mr Bromley) and invited him to take the public into his confidence, and tell them how the rain had come about. “Certainly,” he replied; “here's the story in a nutshell. The low-pressure waves which lately have been rapidly traversing the Southern Ocean combined yesterday off Tasmania into one large antarctic disturbance. At the same time an energetic anti-cyclone moved in swiftly over Western Australia, thus causing steep barometric gradients between the two systems. As a result of this difference in atmospheric pressure very strong, cold, and squally west and south winds have been and are still being experienced over the whole of south eastern Australia. The cold winds which swept South Australia brought extremely opportune rain to the agricultural areas. This morning's weather bulletin shows that the falls, which extended south from Blinman, were light to moderate, but on the whole uniform in character. Nearly every station registered over a quarter of an inch. The heaviest falls, as usual, were over the Mount Lofty Ranges, where many stations received about three-quarters of an inch, the maximum having been 0.80 at Meadows. Other useful falls of more than half an inch were gauged at the following places:— Farrell's Flat, 0.62; Tanunda, 0.60; Kapunda, 0.56; Manoora, 0.55; Warooka, 0.53; and Mount Gambier, 0.64. Fierce squalls, with hail, visited the city early this morning, and the wind at about 6 o'clock reached a velocity of 50 miles an hour. The gales and hail-storms were not confined to Adelaide, however, as a number of stations recorded them, while several in the northern highlands and along the Mount Lofty Ranges reported light falls of snow. The temperature in the air at Stirling West dropped to 24 leg.— 8 deg. below freezing. It is worthy of note that this is the first time snow has occurred during the present year. Although this is rather late, falls have been previously known even in October.
—Weather Improving.— At 9 p.m. Mr. Bromley made the following supplementary statement:— “During Friday, passing showers were notified from all except the far western and northern areas. Temperatures were low— a maximum of 48.0 at Stirling West— and at Adelaide reached a maximum of 57.6 from a minimum of 39.6. Further useful falls of rain were registered over the southern agricultural districts, and up to 3 p.m. Clare reported the maximum of 0.15. Barometers are rising rapidly, indicating the advance of a large anti-cyclone from the west, so that we may expect the weather to improve generally, although there may be a few showers at first, chiefly confined to the extreme sooth and south-eastern districts.”
— Country Reports.— As usual the rural correspondents of The Register lost no time in communicating by telegraph and telephone the climatic and atmospheric happenings in their respective localities. This was from Belair:— “During the night exceptionally cold, wintry weather was experienced. At 7 o'clock this morning there was a fall of snow, which lasted about 15 minutes.” A message from Booleroo Centre stated:—“Winter and summer in one. Snow, in gullies and on Mount Remarkable.” Morchard intimated: — “A fairly heavy fall of snow was witnessed here. The Coomoroo Hills are white. The weather has been stormy, with a little rain.” Tarcowie's visitation consisted of “Forty points of rain, snow, and wind.” “At Mount Lofty,” telephoned a resident, “snow fell for a considerable time, and covered the landscape with a light, soft mantle of white.” A report from Houghton stated:— “During the night extraordinary showers of hailstones pelted down, and at dawn were followed by several falls of snow. The temperature is intensely keen. The hail will not be welcomed by fruitgrowers. Last year the fruit buds were almost wholly ruined in. some cases, and as this season's budding is unusually early, owing to the recent hot weather, it is probable that the damage will be considerable.” Hornsdale, Chain of Ponds, Auburn, Burra, Terowie, Hallet, and Blackrock correspondents also reported falls of snow. At Terowie the white covering was 6 in. deep in places. Cheering references were made to more or less heavy downpours of rain, which, it was asserted, will do an immense amount of good. The only disappointing and gloomy note was struck by a resident of Blackrock, who concluded with the remark:— “There is no hope of a good season here, however, unless inches more fall very soon.”

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59222759
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4503579
APA citation
SUMMER-WINTER. (1911, September 16). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 15. Retrieved March 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59222759 

*********************************************************

Port Augusta Dispatch, Newcastle and Flinders Chronicle (SA : 1885 - 1916), Friday 15 September 1911, page 2
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/202956126

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

During the week the weather has been warm, touching 85 degrees in the shade on Tuesday [12th - Miles]. The glass at 4 a.m. this morning dropped to 44 degrees, or 10 degrees lower than the reading at the same time the preceding day. The effect of this change was more marked the other side of the range, for Mt. Remarkable was this morning capped with snow [Friday 15th - Miles]. Welcome rainfalls were also experienced in certain districts, Melrose registering 41 points ... In regard to the snow it will be remembered that last October a heavy fall covered the Flinders Range near Augusta. During that period the lowest temperature recorded in Port Augusta was 41 degrees —3 degrees lower than this morning's reading.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202956126
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22379499
APA citation
No Title (1911, September 15). The Port Augusta Dispatch, Newcastle and Flinders Chronicle (SA : 1885 - 1916), p. 2. Retrieved March 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202956126 

*********************************************************

It doesn't explicitly say so but as the below article was published by the Burra Record, it's pretty safe to assume that the residents referred to were residents of Burra, or at least the Burra district.

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), Wednesday 20 September 1911, page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/37481769

{quoting whole article}

A Cold Snap with Snow.
After several very warm days residents experienced a rather cold time on Friday morning [15th - Miles], when hail and snow fell, and the wind, extraordinary cold, blew from the south. Nice showers of rain fell during the night, and early morning which will, needless to say, do immense good in the agricultural areas.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37481769
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4757580
APA citation
A Cold Snap with Snow. (1911, September 20). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved March 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37481769 

********************************************************

This report below is very similar to the wording in the above Burra Record report so perhaps was written by the same person or was copied with a few changes from the Burra Record article.

Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), Friday 22 September 1911, page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/108337433

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

BURRA LETTER
— Rain, Hail, and Snow —
After some days of warm and dry weather the residents of this district experienced a very cold snap on Friday last, when rain, hail, and snow fell. The change was badly wanted, and it is recognized that substantial good will be the result.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108337433
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10569474
APA citation
BURRA LETTER (1911, September 22). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 6. Retrieved March 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108337433 

********************************************************

Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Sat 23 Sep 1911 Page 17.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88743059

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

NOTES FROM THE COUNTRY.
PETERSBURG, September 15.— Last evening heavy rain began at 5, and lasted throughout the greater part of the night. Snow fell heavily about 4 a.m., and at 6 a torrential downpour took place, accompanied by sleet and strong winds. The rain abated about 9 a.m.

OODLAWIRRA, September 15.— ... At 5.30 a.m. to-day a fall of snow took place.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88743059
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8732332
APA citation
NOTES FROM THE COUNTRY. (1911, September 23). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 17. Retrieved March 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88743059 

*********************************************************

Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Fri 22 Sep 1911 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/97346585

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

[Tarcowie is west of Peterborough and south of Orroroo.]

TARCOWIE, September 18. [Monday - Miles] ... . Last Thursday was a real summer's day, but during the night it set in squally, and on Friday morning [15th - Miles] the hills around Tarcowie were capped with snow. A few flakes fell in the town, but melted almost as soon as they touched the ground.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97346585
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9612596
APA citation
News Letters. (1911, September 22). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97346585 

*********************************************************

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 19 September 1911, page 14
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5313874

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

TEROWIE. September 15—The Broken Hill express came in to Terowie to-day covered with snow. It was bitterly cold with a strong southerly wind.

BELALIE NORTH. September 18.—This morning snow fell verv thickly. The snow lay on Mount Lock and other hills till about 10 o'clock. [I think it very likely that the date 18 should be 15 and that 18 rather than 15 was an error by the correspondent or a rare typesetting error by the newspaper. I found no other record of snow on 18th. - Miles]

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5313874
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page948728
APA citation
THE LAND AND THE PRODUCER. (1911, September 19). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 14. Retrieved March 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5313874 

*********************************************************

Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924), Tuesday 19 September 1911, page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/105336111

STOCKWELL, September 16.
On Friday morning snow was noticed to fall, and farther east it was reported to have been quite heavy.
MELROSE, September 15
It commenced to rain about 10 o'clock last night. Hail and sleet fell early this morning. The top of Mount Remarkable was white for some hours.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article105336111
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10495680
APA citation
WEATHER AND CROPS (1911, September 19). Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924), p. 5. Retrieved March 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article105336111 

*********************************************************

Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), Friday 22 September 1911, page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/147744688

URAIDLA, September 18.
On Friday morning last there was a slight all of snow in these parts, but it soon melted when the sun appeared.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147744688
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17355245
APA citation
THE SOUTHERN DISTRICTS. (1911, September 22). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 8, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147744688

*********************************************************

Reports of an unusual hailstorm on 22nd August 1911.

Below: A weather map dated 830am 22nd August 1911 - the morning of the day of the hailstorm. I found it on the same page as the following article:
The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wed 23 Aug 1911 Page 3 WEATHER
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/58442591



Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Tue 22 Aug 1911 Page 1.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/203460276

HAIL IN THE HILLS.
Remarkable Storm.
At about half-past 2 on Tuesday afternoon seven claps of thunder were followed in portions of the Mount Lofty Ranges by a particularly heavy hailstorm, which lasted for 20 minutes. A telephone message from Stirling East indicated that the downpour was the most sustained that had been experienced for many years, and when it ceased the hills were covered with a layer of hailstones. While the storm raged in the ranges Adelaide was enjoying fine but cloudy weather.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article203460276
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22447165
APA citation
HAIL IN THE HILLS. (1911, August 22). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 1. Retrieved March 13, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article203460276 

********************************************************

 The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wed 23 Aug 1911 Page 11.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5304001

{quoting only hail-relevant text from longer article}

HEAVY HAILSTORM.
O'HALLORAN HILL, August 22.—A peculiar hailstorm occurred at midday, lasting over an hour. The surrounding hills appeared as if draped with a mantle of snow. The hail was lying many inches thick for hours. This is the record hailstorm in this district for over 40 years.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5304001
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page948325
APA citation
THE LAND AND THE PRODUCER. (1911, August 23). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 11. Retrieved March 6, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5304001 

********************************************************

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Thursday 24 August 1911, page 13.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5304171

CHERRY GARDENS, August 21.[very likely the correct date is August 22 - Miles]—A very severe thunderstorm passed over here this afternoon, and lasted almost an hour. Hail fell in abundance, and in a few moments the ground was white and th spouting blocked. The water leaked through the roofs and ran down into the living-rooms. It is feared the cold will check the young growth and spoil the magnificent wattle blossom which has been such a fine sight of late. The boys built a "snow man" out of the hail.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5304171
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page948341
APA citation
THE LAND AND THE PRODUCER. (1911, August 24). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 13. Retrieved March 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5304171 

********************************************************

End of report.

Back to Top

*

*

*****