1909 Snowfalls.

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Forward to first 1910 snow page.

First a brief summary of 1909 snow events in sequence.

A search on Trove for snowfalls in 1909 using various keywords, found four different snow events. For more information on each event you can scroll down the page or click on the links in the headings and then use the back button to return here.

Wednesday 14th July

I found two reports of snow falling on 14th July. One may have been from the Jamestown district where a coursing club meeting was abandoned due to "heavy showers of rain, hail, and snow which fell through-out the day". The other report was of snow falling at Yongala.

Sunday 25th July


I found reports of snow falling on Sunday 25th July from four locations - Hallett, Burra, Yongala and Mount Lofty.

Widespread snowfall Thursday 29th July. Snowballing by moonlight. Probably within top 20 historic falls. Snowballing by moonlight.

During daylight hours on Thursday there were reports of some substantial snowfalls during the morning, forming carpets in some locations including part of the Barossa Ranges and at some Mid-North locations. During the evening of Thursday 29th snow fell widely over the higher ground of the Mid-North and parts of the Barossa Valley. I found only a few reports of snow in the southern Mt Lofty Ranges on Thursday evening. I found two reports of snow falling on Wednesday 28th.

Overall this Thursday 29th July fall was the highlight of the 1909 South Australian snow season and one of the decade's biggest snowfalls. The snow fell to unusually low levels including Kapunda, Saddleworth, Freeling, Nurioopta and Tanunda. It could be seen by the light of a reasonably bright moon in an era when street lighting was minimal, and remained carpeting the ground until after sunrise Friday morning at some locations.

August Sunday-Monday 1st-2nd

There were reports of moderate to heavy snowfalls from several Mid-North towns and a report from Port Pirie "Snow was to be seen to-day on the summit of the Flinders Ranges—the first time it has been visible from the town this season". I also found one report from Mount Lofty and one from the Mt Barker district, and one report from Mt Gambier: "It was coldest on Monday forenoon, when the thermometer mercury descended to 39deg., and some snow fell with the rain In a couple of the showers before 9 o'clock".

3rd August to beginning of December - no reports of snow found.

I searched all South Australian newspapers on the Trove database between the dates 2nd August and 14th December, using the search keywords snow rain. Not a single mention did I find of any fall of snow within that period. The search is not fullproof by any means but if there was a significant fall reported in more than say one article I'm pretty confident the search would have found it.

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End of brief summary of 1909 snow reports.

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Now to each snow event in more detail.

Calendar for July 1909, Source timeanddate.com. Re phases of the moon: full moon on 3rd July and 2nd August.



Reports of snow on Wednesday 14th July 1909.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 3½

I studied what rating to give this fall after adding more information to my original report on this event, and I'm satisfied with the rating of 3½ while wondering if this snowfall may have been more extensive in the Mid-North and was under-reported in the newspapers.

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Monday 19 July 1909, page 9.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/56724077
Source: Trove website (National Library of Australia)

{quoting snow-related text from longer article}

CALTOWIE, July 15.—The hills around Mount Lock are covered with snow this morning, and present a picturesque sight. A heavy fall must have occurred on the ranges during the night. The weather is still intensely cold, and the showers this morning are mixed with snow.

HORNSDALE, July 15—This morning the Mannanarie Range was covered with snow. Little fell on the plains, and none on the Bundaleer Range. This is the first snow for the winter—a mouth later than last year.

YONGALA, July 15.—Yesterday was bleak and wet, and during the night snow fell, but as there was plenty of rain it thawed quickly. The fall was heavier out on the hills, which are still snowcapped this morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56724077
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4493411
APA citation
ST. PETER'S OLD SCHOLARS' DINNER. (1909, July 19). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 9. Retrieved October 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56724077

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I found reports of snow falling wherever it was that the "newly-formed Canowie Belt Coursing Club held its first meeting on Wednesday", and at Yongala in the Mid-North.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 19 July 1909, page 10
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5733536

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

THE CANOWIE BELT MEETING.
Jamestown, July 15.
The newly-formed Canowie Belt Coursing Club held its first meeting on Wednesday. Rain fell continually during the early morning, and it was impossible to make a start until 9.30 a.m. Hares were plentiful, but wild, and owing to heavy showers of rain, hail, and snow which fell through-out the day, it was impossible to make headway, so that only the first round was got through by night time, when the meeting was abandoned.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5733536
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940491
APA citation
THE WATERLOO CU[?] (1909, July 19). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 10. Retrieved December 1, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5733536 

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Below is part of a report by the Weather Bureau summarising the weather for the week beginning (if I interpret the text correctly) Tuesday 13th July and mentioning snow at Yongala on 14th.

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Thursday 22 July 1909, page 3
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/56733925

{quoting snow-related text from longer article}

THE WEEK'S WEATHER
NOTES FOR WEEK ENDED JULY 21.
[By the Weather Bureau.]

Cloudy and showery weather has prevailed throughout the agricultural districts during the past week; but over the far north and the north-east and north-west pastoral country the conditions have been fine, and no rain has fallen north of Blinman. On Wednesday a ''low' existed over the south-east districts, and under its influence cold weather was experienced in this State south of Port Augusta, with passing showers, accompanied by hail, and at Yongala a light fall of snow was recorded. Fierce squalls were also reported in the extreme south-east. This disturbance gradually died out, and a large anticyclone rested over the State; but its presence over the southern portion was only temporary, for on Saturday another low-pressure wave moved rapidly along the ocean, and brought showery conditions again on Sunday, which continued for the rest of the week. The rain was general over the agricultural areas, and heavy in places along the coast. The early part of the week was cold. The maximum temperature at Stirling West was only 43 deg. and 44 deg. respectively on Wednesday and Thursday, and at many other stations the mercury kept below 50 deg.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56733925
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4493439
APA citation
THE WEEK'S WEATHER (1909, July 22). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 3. Retrieved October 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56733925

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Below are the weather maps from The Advertiser dated 13th, 14th and 15th July 1909. These are likely to be closely based on the government weather office's weather maps issued at 9am on those three days.







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Below is some text from the article that the above 15-7-09 weather map was embedded in, including a report of snow at Yongala on Wednesday [14th].

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Friday 16 July 1909, page 11
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5733170

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

METEOROLOGIST'S REPORT.
The Observatory, Thursday, 9 p.m.

During the 24 hours previous to 8.30 a.m. on Thursday, light to heavy and general rain had fallen over this State south of Blinman. ... .
Wednesday night was very cold, snow having fallen at Yongala.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5733170
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940462
APA citation
THE WEATHER MAP. (1909, July 16). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 11. Retrieved December 10, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5733170

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Reports of snow on Sunday 25th July 1909.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 3½ or 4

I studied what rating to give this fall on 27th October 2017 after adding more information to my original report on this event, and I'm satisfied with the rating of 3½ or 4.

Calendar for July 1909, Source timeanddate.com. Re phases of the moon: full moon on 3rd July and 2nd August.



In The Advertiser and The Register newspapers in the Trove database I found reports of snow falling on Sunday 25th July from four locations - Hallett, Burra, Yongala and Mount Lofty. The reports say:

HALLETT. July 25.—... . There was a slight fall of snow this afternoon, the tops of the Mount Bryan hills are white.

BURRA, July 25.—The season, though wet, has been comparatively mild, and free from frost. To-day the first snow for the season fell, accompanied by rain.

The weather bureau reported that extremely cold weather was experienced at Yongala and the surrounding stations on Sunday, and a light fall of snow occurred.

SNOW AT MOUNT LOFTY.
On Sunday evening snow began to fall lightly at Mount Lofty.

Now to the details. Here are weather maps published in The Advertiser newspaper for Saturday 24th and Monday 26th July. They are presumably closely based on the government weather bureau maps issued at 9am for those days. Following usual practice there was presumably no weather bureau map produced on Sunday 25th. Based on these two weather maps we can speculate with some confidence that the snow fell from a very cold airstream coming directly from the Southern Ocean.





Next to the newspaper reports I found of snow falling on Sunday 25th July.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 27 July 1909, page 9
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5751875

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

HALLETT. July 25.—... . There was a slight fall of snow this afternoon, the tops of the Mount Bryan hills are white.

BURRA, July 25.—The season, though wet, has been comparatively mild, and free from frost. To-day the first snow for the season fell, accompanied by rain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5751875
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940585
APA citation
THE PRODUCER (1909, July 27). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 9. Retrieved December 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5751875 

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Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 27 July 1909, page 7
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5751940

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

STORMS AND SNOW.
A WINTRY DAY.
The cold weather of Sunday afternoon and evening was felt by everyone. In the afternoon in particular, when the cessation of rain and the clearing of the sky seemed to presage a heavy frost, the cold was acutely felt. In the city nothing of particular note from the meteorologist's point of view occurred, but the stiff, cold breeze that came up from the south-west, drove many clouds overhead to the Mount Lofty range, where snow fell. Complete reports are not to hand, but as far as can be ascertained the fall of snow was only light.

In the vicinity of Mount Lofty it commenced snowing about 6 o'clock, and for from 10 to 15 minutes the soft, white, downy fleece fell silently. The fall was not heavy enough to mantle the ground, but for a moment or two the flakes came thickly and presented quite a pretty spectacle as they dropped through the fast-gathering twilight of the winter's evening. It was the first fall of snow that has been experienced in the hills this year, and persons were attracted out of doors to witness it. During Sunday several heavy hail storms also passed over portions of the hills. They were accompanied by wind that at times arose almost to the velocity of a gale. It is probable that hailstones have done some damage to vegetables, particularly those in the early stages of growth. Sunday night in the hills was exceedingly rough.

On Monday the weather was again bleak and cold, and heavy showers fell. Yongala, Burra, and Uraidla experienced light falls of snow on Sunday afternoon.

A GENERAL RAIN.
The Observatory officials reported at 9 p.m.:—"Continued wintry and showery conditions have prevailed in Adelaide to-day, with strong westerly winds: The day opened dull and cloudy, with a minimum temperature of 43.6. Toward noon the sky cleared and the sun shone out for a brief period. But several sharp showers fell during the afternoon and evening, and 22 points were registered up to 9 p.m. The reports for the 48 hours ending 8.30 this morning show that a general rain has fallen over the southern portions of this State, extending as far north as Quorn. The fall was heaviest amongst the Mount Lofty Ranges, where ten stations reported more than an inch. The maximum was 195 points at. Stirling West. Throughout the State there were 51 stations which registered more than half an inch. Extremely cold weather was experienced at Yongala and the surrounding stations on Sunday, and a light fall of snow occurred.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5751940
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940583
APA citation
STORMS AND SNOW. (1909, July 27). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved December 9, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5751940 

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Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 26 July 1909, page 6
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5750134

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

SNOW AT MOUNT LOFTY.
On Sunday evening snow began to fall lightly at Mount Lofty.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5750134
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940570
APA citation
TOPICS OF THE DAY. (1909, July 26). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved December 1, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5750134 

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), Wednesday 28 July 1909, page 2
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/37329836

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

The Weather.
We had another cold week, rain, frost, wind and a few flakes of snow made up the variety programme. ... . On Sunday afternoon the wind blew very strong accompanied by heavy rain, and a a light fall of snow, which, however, melted as soon as it touched the ground. Thunder was heard in the westward, and in the evening lightning was noticed in the same direction. Monday night was exceedingly boisterous. About 79 points of rain have been registered for the week.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37329836
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4757194
APA citation
The Weather. (1909, July 28). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37329836

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Widespread snowfall Thursday 29th July. Snowballing by moonlight. Probably within top 20 historic falls.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 7 or 8

On October 28th 2017 I reviewed the rating of 7 that I originally gave this snowfall and changed it to 7 or 8.

On Wednesday 28th July isolated light and local falls of snow were reported. So before I get to Thursday I'll report on what I found for Wednesday.

The weather office reported on Thursday [29th]: "Very cold and squally weather was experienced over this State on Wednesday [28th], with heavy driving showers of hail and rain over the agricultural areas, and at scattered places thunderstorms were reported. ... . Reports received yesterday afternoon [Wednesday 28th] showed that light snow had fallen over parts of the hills and around the north between Yongala and Burra. It was still snowing at the above-mentioned places at 8.30 a.m to-day [29th] ... .

So they say in regard to Wednesday "Reports received yesterday afternoon [Wednesday 28th] showed that light snow had fallen over parts of the hills and around the north between Yongala and Burra.

The only other report for Wednesday I found is this one below referring to a light snowfall at Mount Lofty. But earlier in the afternoon a much more dramatic weather event unfolded on the plain below. A thunderstorm passed over the city heading east about 1pm, without causing much disruption in the city apparently, but further to the eastwards on the plain and onto the hills face some very heavy rain and hail fell, resulting in both local and more widespread flooding across parts of Adelaide.

From The Advertiser article below I've only quoted the Lofty snow report. In the same article the storm and the flooding that followed is described in considerable detail. If you'd like to read about it, click on the next link below to go to the story.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Thursday 29 July 1909, page 10
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752152

SNOW AT MOUNT LOFTY.

Bitterly cold and boisterous weather was experienced in the hills district on Wednesday. At Mount Lofty there were frequent heavy fails of rain and hail, and late in the afternoon a light fall of snow occurred.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752152
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940610
APA citation
HEAVY RAIN (1909, July 29). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 10. Retrieved December 6, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752152

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On Thursday 29th July there were widespread falls of snow in the Mid-North and Barossa Ranges and parts of the Barossa Valley and perhaps to a lesser extent in the southern Mt Lofty Ranges. In more detail, there were some lengthy snowfalls to very unusually low levels in the morning, sufficient to carpet hills and even some plains locations for a while. Then during the evening there was a widespread moderate to heavy period of snow again falling to very unusually low levels, making a snow carpet that remained on the ground till after sunrise the next day at least in some locations.

By good fortune the moon was about four days brighter than half full on Thursday and would have been high in the sky on that evening to shine when there were breaks in the clouds.

To give you an idea of the significance of this fall and its place in the history of snowfalls in South Australia, there has been no snowfall of anywhere near this magnitude in the seventeen years from the year 2000 to 2016 inclusive.

Due to there being correspondents in numerous towns in the countryside who reported in to one or more of the newspapers on some of the events occuring in their towns and districts, reporting of noteworthy snowfalls was often excellent by todays newspaper standards. Nevertheless it's necessary to piece together scattered reports from a very large area of South Australia from the southern Flinders Ranges to the southern Mt Lofty Ranges to get an overall picture of the extent of this fall.

Now to the newspaper articles I found reporting snow on Thursday and Friday. It wasn't an exhaustive search and there are other articles with relevant info not included below. I've put weather maps and a brief discussion of the causes of this snow at the end of the newspaper articles below.

And a word about Friday, there are reports referring to snow on the ground on Friday morning but I don't recall seeing any reports of snow falling on Friday, so when the last snow fell remains an unknown.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Friday 30 July 1909, page 7
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752375

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

STORMY WEATHER.
FALLS OF SNOW.
The weather office reported on Thursday: "Very cold and squally weather was experienced over this State on Wednesday, with heavy driving showers of hail and rain over the agricultural areas, and at scattered places thunderstorms were reported. The rain extended inland to Beltana, 116 stations registering over a quarter of an inch. The maximum amounts were between Saddleworth and Tarlee, and on the Mount Lofty hills, where over an inch fell. Reports received yesterday afternoon showed that light snow had fallen over parts of the hills and around the north between Yongala and Burra. It was still snowing at the above-mentioned places at 8.30 a.m to-day. Very stormy weather prevails over the the south-east and south coasts of this State, and extends over the ocean towards New Zealand. The depression of great energy exists between Tasmania and the Dominion and under its influence we may expert cold and showery weather to continue over the agricultural areas of this State for the present."

TWO INCHES OF SNOW AT MOUNT
LOFTY.
Heavy storms of rain and hail were frequent at Mount Lofty yesterday, and towards evening the weather became bitterly cold. At about 8 o'clock last night snow began to fall, and it continued for about an hour and a half, when it lay on the ground two inches in depth. The scene by the light of the moon was enchanting.

SNOWBALLING BY MOONLIGHT. UNUSUAL SIGHT AT ANGASTON.
Angaston, July 29.
A heavy fall of snow took place tonight, the ground being covered with a mantle of white from two to three inches deep. Nearly all the residents are in the streets, and snowballing by moonlight is being thoroughly enjoyed by all classes of the community. Dignified citizens are to be seen romping about like schoolboys, and pedestrians are very clever if they are able to dodge the attacks of the enemy, whose scouts are posted at every point.

SNOW AT KAPUNDA.
Kapunda, July 29.
Several officials of the Kapunda Coursing Club, who have returned from Analaby, re-
port that further courses would have to be abandoned, the ground being covered with snow. The ranges west of Kapunda were also mantled with snow this morning, while the River Light was in flood.

RECORD SNOWFALL AT TANUNDA.
Tanunda, July 29, 11.15 p.m.
A snow fall of a particularly heavy character, which took place here to-night, was the cause of much admiration and delight among the townspeople. Snow had fal en in the Barossa Ranges during the morning, and the higher peaks, the Kaiserstuhl and Trial Hill especially, presented a most picturesque scene, clothed in a dazzling mantle of white. Tonight at about 9 o'clock an exceptionally heavy fall took place in the town, the streets and footpaths being covered in several inches of snow, whilst the roofs or the houses were clothed in a mantle of white. Trees and shrubs presented a scene of remarkable beauty, the glistening white of the snowflakes contrasting harmoniously with the underlying green of the leaves. Crowds of admirers were everywhere to be seen, whilst snow-balling was the popular recreation among old as well as young. Residents are unanimous in agreeing the present to be the heaviest fall on record, the nearest approach to it having been nine years ago, when a heavy, but not such an uninterrupted fall as the present was recorded.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752375
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940623
APA citation
STORMY WEATHER. (1909, July 30). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved November 30, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752375 

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Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Friday 30 July 1909, page 5
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/56724398

{quoting entire article}

IN THE LOWER NORTH.

BURRA, July 29.— A heavy snowstorm occurred this morning, and at noon the hills around the town were looking magnificent. Snowballing was going on in the town, and the people had great fun.
AUBURN, July 20.— A fall of snow occurred this morning, and the hills in the distance were covered. Snowballing was engaged in. A couple of golf enthusiasts had a lively time yesterday out on the links. They were prepared for wet with umbrellas and coats, and were not disappointed in their expectations. When they were well out in the open, away from even the shelter of a wire fence, a heavy hail storm took place. They crouched down under their "gamps" for some time till the storm had passed over, and, although the flat ground was fairly under water, subsequently continued their game.
CLARE, July 29.— This morning heavy thunder was followed by a severe hail-storm, after which came a good fall of snow, and the hills looked pretty in their white mantle.
TANUNDA, July 29.— This afternoon a slight snowfall was witnessed in the town, and the hills adjoining were covered with white, but after an hour or so it disappeared. The Kaiserstuhl, Trial Hill, and other higher hills were a treat for the eye. To-night at about 9.30 a heavy fall took place in the town. Half an hour later snow men were built along the street at intervals. The trees and gardens presented an imposing sight, and everything was clothed in a white mantle. The trees where the bright acetylene gaslights were showing were a picture. Scores of spectators were to be seen in all directions, while parties carried the snow men up and down the streets. At the Tanunda Hotel a snow man 3 ft. high was exhibited on the counter. It is thought that the fall was about 2 in. deep. The North Para River and Bethany Creek are high and are rapidly rising.
WATERVALE, July 29.— A fall of snow occurred this morning, just before 10 o'clock. It was pretty while it lasted, and when it ceased the hills to the south-east of Watervale presented a lovely sight with their white covering. It appeared to fall much more heavily at Leasingham. Smaller quantities have continued since with rain, and creeks are in flood.
RIVERTON, July 20.— After some days of skirmishing snow fell in earnest round and about the town, and at 10 o'clock this morning the hills were white. Between 4 o'clock yesterday and 10 this morning 1.20 of rain fell, and in consequence all the low-lying parts were completely inundated, and fears were expressed of the flooding of the township. Sheets of water acres in extent are discernible on every side, and farmers are concerned for the crops, as, owing to the excessive moisture of the past fortnight, much soil washing has occurred. On the main north-west road to Clare huge banks of sand and loam are found every few miles, having been carried out of the paddocks adjoining and deposited on and across the metal. The River Gilbert and its many creek feeders have not been so high for 11 years.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56724398
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4493523
APA citation
IN THE LOWER NORTH. (1909, July 30). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved December 4, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56724398 

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), Friday 6 August 1909, page 5

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/108430117

{quoting the entire article}

Fall of Snow at Kapunda.
A Magnificent Spectacle

The fall of snow which was occurring in Kapunda as we went to press on Thursday evening of last week (July 29) culminated in a rare and magnificent sight. Everywhere was spread a thick mantle of white. It was a moonlight night, and the soft rays as they filtered through the cold-grey clouds and were reflected by the snow, gave a weirdness that was past description. The fall was first witnessed about 9.30 p.m., when those who happened to be out noticed a fleeciness in the gentle rain which was falling. It rapidly grew faster and thicker, and a few minutes sufficed to give one quite a coating of white. Most people, of course, were snugly ensconced at their firesides, and some early retirers had gone to bed, These were quickly apprised of the phenomenon, and people could be seen running in all directions and knocking at doors, shouting "Come out and see the snow ! "
There was a ready response, and in a few minutes groups were to be seen in Main-street, on South-terrace, and many other places, excitedly engaged in snowballing. There was a fairly large group on South-terrace, when a "pitched battle" took place lasting for an hour or more. In Main-street a snow man was built, and anyone who ventured in the neighborhood was subjected to a fusillade of snowballs. This was the first time the majority of the people has witnessed a fall of snow, whilst many who had seen it before had not done so since leaving the old country, fifty or sixty years ago. It was the first time in the experience of man in Kapunda that snow has fallen in the town, though on several occasions it has been seen on the ranges at Taylor's Gap on the west side of the town, and at Bagot's Well on the east, and occasionally it has been brought down from Eudunda. Trees and housetops were draped in white, and gardens presented a beautiful sight, for everything was literally covered, so complete and ample was the fall. About 11 o'clock there was a little rain, and this quickly thawed the snow in exposed places. On Friday people were up unusually early, and groups were to be seen on Bald Hill, Gundry's Hill, and other elevated positions looking over the town, which was most picturesque, notwithstanding that by that time thawing had been considerable. Several photographers were about, and the "Herald" cameraist secured several typical scenes. Large quantities of snow were gathered for snowballing purposes, and during the morning business in Main-street was almost suspended, the amusement of bombarding passers-by taking the place of work. Some of the attacks were very amusing, and the street resounded with peals of laughter as some unfortunate found himself the target for a series of well-directed balls. This was continued until midday, when the supply of "ammunition" ran out. Several windows were broken, but the damage was not serious, and was taken in good part by the owners of the property, one remarking "Oh, well, it was the best bit of fun I ever had." Several snow men were on view on Friday morning. Mr. J. Smith, of the Railway Hotel, had an excellent one, and Mr. F. H. Ansell, of Mildred-street, had a number of admirers of his handywork in the manipulation of snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108430117
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10568534
APA citation
Fall of Snow at Kapunda. (1909, August 6). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 5. Retrieved December 6, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108430117 

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In brief:

Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), Friday 6 August 1909, page 6
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/108430168

Snowballing.
Tlie fall -of snow here on Thursday last ?nteak seems to have caused. J several of the young men and boys to lose their heads, as, in ' their Svciting game of snowballing a gcod deal of injury and damage appears \ to ~have been dowe. Residents were j knocked about and injured albout the j head and face, their clothes being : spoiled -and i their umbrellas smashed, i while tbe windows . of several business places were -broken. The throwers seem to have had no regard' for j anyone, as they -were throwing mix- j iures of snow, hailstones, mud, Sic., rolled up hard. There may be a certain "amount of fun in pelting each other with p-ore snow, but when passers by are cannonaded with hail and mud,- it is there where - enow- ' balling ends.

***********************************************************************

There's a lengthy article in The Register with reports from various locations which I haven't corrected, but it looks like it has additional information relating to snow falling on 28-29th July. I may correct it in the future but meanwhile here is the info to find it on Trove.

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Saturday 31 July 1909, page 9
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/56728576

APA citation
FLOODS ON THE ADELAIDE PLAINS (1909, July 31). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 9. Retrieved December 4, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56728576 

****************************************************

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 31 July 1909, page 10

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752512

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article - there's text about rain and very interesting text on flooding I've not corrected on Trove or included here - go to the above link to see the full article}

SPLENDID NORTHERN RAINS.
MORE SNOWSTORMS.

The weather office reported on Friday:— "The large depression was again respon-sible for bitterly cold weather over South Australia on Thursday, hail and snow-storms being reported at a large number of stations over the Mount Lofty hills, the Barossa district, and between the Burra and Terowie.
... . The depression is now moving away from this State, and though we may still expect some showers around the hills and over the coastal districts the weather on the whole will be mostly fine and cold, with frosts inland tonight. In many cases the snowfalls have been exceptionally heavy, especially over the Barossa district, and over the Mount Lofty hills the fall extended down to Blackwood, which is a rare occurrence."

At Anlaby ... .
A heavy fall of snow occurred at about 9 p.m. on Thursday, the ground being covered to a depth of about 3 in. [This snow very probably fell at Anlaby but it's not entirely clear from the wording in the article which I've not included here as it doesn't relate to snow - Miles]
... .
Marrabel, July 29.
An unusual sight was witnessed here this morning, snow falling incessantly for over two hours. The snow is from 2 to 4 in. deep everywhere. The Julia Range, 10 miles to the north-east, presents a magnificent spectacle, the fall being much heavier than on the plains. The Belvidere Ranges, a few miles to the south, are also an imposing sight.
... .

UNIQUE SIGHT AT ROSEWORTHY
Roseworthy, July 30.
Yesterday about 8.30 snow began falling in large flakes. There was great excitement, as it is the first snow that has fallen here. The young made snowballs. The snow was lying thick on the paling roofs and wood-heaps after 9 o'clock this morning. Farming operations are at a standstill. The roads are in a bad state. The crops are looking well, but the cold weather is keeping all vegetation back.

SNOWBALLING AT TRURO.
Truro, July 30.
Last night a heavy fall of snow took place. In a short time the country was covered in a white mantle. In places the snow was nearly a foot deep. It was the heaviest fall known here. The sight was a grand one in the moonlight. The hills round here were all white. Snowballing soon became general, and was much enjoyed by young and old. Many who had retired got up and joined in the fun. Snow is lying all round this morning, and it is extremely cold. The waters in the creeks are at the highest levels known this winter.

SNOW AT BLACKWOOD.
Blackwood, July 30.
There was a snowstorm last night, the fall being sufficient to cover the railway platform to the depth of nearly 2 in. Frost followed, and at 8 o'clock this morning the platform was still covered with a thick coating of frozen snow and hail. The en-terprising youth of the neighborhood gathered the snow and hail together and erected a "lady of snow" under the shelter-shed, and her ladyship was much admired by the passengers on the early train. Snow-balling was also indulged in. As the result of the heavy rain and hail, the creek which flows through the National Park was running a banker, and the Sturt River also was high.

EXCITEMENT AT KAPUNDA.
Kapunda, July 30.
Great excitement prevailed here last night when a heavy snowstorm fell between 9 and 10 o'clock. Yesterday the Coursing Club meet at Anlaby had to be abandoned on account of the snow, and many of the hills surrounding the town were covered, the fall being specially heavy on the road to Anlaby and at Bagot's Well. Many townsmen drove out to view the sight. Last night was the first time in the memory of the oldest inhabitants that snow has fallen at Kapunda. One lady aged 89 years, who had resided 60 years at Kapunda, witnessed snow falling for the first time since leaving England. Both young and old engaged in snowballing for several hours, and various snow men were built, many of the residents being quite lively long after the usual hour, for retiring. This morning the world was white, all the hills and dales being covered with snow. All the prominent busness people are being snowballed by young and old in the main street. In places the snow is lying fully 6 in. deep.

SNOWBALLING AT THE BURRA.
Burra, July 29.
A good snowstorm occurred to-day. The country is white everywhere. Snowballing has been indulged in, neither aged, infirm, nor the female sex being immune from the pelting.

HEAVY SNOWFALL AT SADDLEWORTH.
Saddleworth, July 30.
About 9 a.m. on Thursday snow began to fall, and continued falling for more than an hour. The shop assistants left their work and pelted each other with snowballs. This is the heaviest fall here for about nine years. The river is running a banker, and people living in low lying parts of the town are anxiously waiting for it to subside. One of the trades-people, thinking a flood was coming, set his assistants to work to clear the shop out, preparatory to leaving it.

SNOWSTORM AT ANGASTON.
Angaston, July 30.
It is eight years almost to the day since the last snowstorm of any consequence took plac,. here, and on this occasion people woke in the morning to find the country covered in white, but did not have the opportunity of seeing the snowflakes falling. Last evening, however, it began to snow at about 9 o'clock, and the news soon spread from house to house, and old and young were soon in the streets and in the fields adjoining their homes. Children were aroused from their slumbers so that they might not lose an opportunity of witnessing a sight that might come only once in many years. Dignified citizens, m:ddle-aged ladies, and demure maidens pelted all and sundry who came their way. The snowflakes flying hither and thither in the moonlight were a beautiful sight, and the dark green of the trees, with their snow-capped branches, made a striking contrast to the pure white mantle on the ground several inches deep. People were early astir this morning, and though the snow on the roads and footpaths had thawed somewhat, the gardens and surrounding country presented a lovely sight. Trees, shrubs, &c., were still carrying their draping of white, and branches were weighted down by their burden, while the fields were extremely picturesque.

Nuriootpa, July 30.
The heaviest fall of snow on record was experienced last night. In a short time the village and the fields were covered with snow quite four inches deep. The children at the public school this morning had the time of their lives.

Freeling, July 30.
On Thursday snow fell at 8.45, and continued for about an hour. Snowballing was indulged in by young and old. This is the first time snow is known to have fallen here.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752512
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940638
APA citation
SPLENDID NORTHERN RAINS. (1909, July 31). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 10. Retrieved December 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752512 

****************************************************

Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), Friday 6 August 1909, page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/108430145

{quoting snow-relevant text and report of a slight tremor from longer article}

Country Letters
FREELING.

August 2. —Earthquake Shock.—
A slight earthquake shock was felt here about 6.20 on Thursday evening last, and was quickly followed by two very sharp claps of thunder.

—The Weather.—
The weather during the past week has been very boisterous, rain falling every day. The total fall for the month has been considerably over 3 inches, which is too much for the crops, some of them being covered with water.

—Snow.—
Much excitement was caused here on Thursday evening, when the residents became aware that snow was falling. This is the first snowfall ever experienced here, and although it only lasted for something like 20 minutes, everything soon wore a beautiful coat. It was followed immediately by a shower of rain, which marred the beauty that would have been witnessed in the morning. However, several photographers were out and secured some fine photographic views, Mr. F. H. Heinrich's residence being among the best. Snowballing was indulged in both in the evening and morning by old and young.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108430145
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10568534
APA citation
Country Letters (1909, August 6). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 5. Retrieved October 30, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108430145

**********

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 2 August 1909, page 5
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752568

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

THE PRODUCER.

POINT PASS, July 29.—A severe snow-storm was experienced to-day. On the surrounding hills the snow lay 9 in. deep in places.

SPRINGTON, July 29.—The creeks ran bankers yesterday. Snow fell this morning. ... .

STOCKWELL, July 30.—The heaviest fall of snow in the memory of the oldest inhabitant occurred on Thursday night. Everything was covered with a white sheet three or four inches in thickness. Staid matrons and elderly men were engaged with others in the exhilarating game of snowballing. This morning the school children made a "lady" and a "man" out of snow. The snowfall did not extend as far as the Murray Flats, ... .

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752568
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940651
APA citation
THE PRODUCER. (1909, August 2). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 5. Retrieved December 5, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752568 

****************************************************

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 2 August 1909, page 9
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752619

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

THE COUNTRY.

BAGOT'S GAP. July 30.—Last night about 9 o'clock there was a good fall of snow here on the hills. In several places the snow was inches deep. The creeks were running strongly. Along the road to the Gap the scene in the moonlight was weird and fantastic. A resident since 1852 said it was the first time he had seen snow except at a great way off on Mount Lofty road. At 6.30 next morning the snow was still lying about in large heaps. The drift came from a south-easterly direction from more elevated country.

WASLEYS, July 31.—There was a light fall of snow on Thursday night about 9 o'clock, preceded by three hours of continuous heavy rain.

MELROSE, July 29.—A fall of snow occurred on Mount Remarkable this morning, and continued throughout the day. The mount, viewed from the township, presented a picturesque appearance whenever the clouds lifted. The snow was nearly a foot deep in some of the gullies. The weather was bitterly cold and boisterous throughout the district during Wednesday and Thursday, with heavy rain and hail.

BLYTH, July 30. — Rain has fallen every day, and on Thursday the rain was accompanied by hail, sleet, and snow. The fall of snow was light, but the hills a few miles away were covered for the width of a couple of miles, and remained quite white for several hours.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752619
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940655
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1909, August 2). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 9. Retrieved February 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752619

*********************************************************

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wed 4 Aug 1909 Page 2
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/37331612

FALL OF SNOW.

The digital version of this article on Trove is pretty unreadable so rather than spend a lot of time correcting it I've taken images of the snow-relevant part of the Trove image of the newspaper article.

The Thursday referred to when the snow fell is the 29th July.





Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37331612
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4757198
APA citation
FALL OF SNOW. (1909, August 4). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 5, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37331612 

****************************************************

The Laura Standard (SA : 1889 - 1917) Thu 12 Aug 1909 Page 3
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/188851933

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

MELROSE
August 1st.

More rain, snow, and hail! ... .
The top of Mount Remarkable was covered in snow for some time last week, and
the weather was very cold.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article188851933
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page21155998
APA citation
MELROSE. (1909, August 12). The Laura Standard (SA : 1889 - 1917), p. 3. Retrieved December 8, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article188851933 

****************************************************

So we've reached the end of the newspaper articles I found with content relating to the snowfalls of Thursday-Friday 29-30th July. Now a look at the causes of this widespread and in places heavy snowfall.

Firstly, here are weather maps for the five days 27th to 31st July, from The Advertiser, presumably closely based on the weather bureau's official maps issued at 9am each day.











Insofar as I can determine from the sources available, we are looking at very cold air from the Southern Ocean as being the primary source of the heavy and widespread snowfalls near the end of the month. As with the other big falls in the first decade of the 20th century we have no means of determining how far south the relevant air masses were originating, how fast they came north, what the upper level pressures and temperatures and winds were, or where the abundant moisture originated.

Below is the most snow-relevant text I could see in a summary of July's weather by Mr. E. Bromley, Acting Divisional Officer for South Australia, which includes commentary on the meteorology during July and in particular the weather patterns prevailing at the times of our snowfalls.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 3 August 1909, page 8
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752736

{quoting text from a longer article}

JULY WEATHER.
A COLD AND WET MONTH.
(By Mr. E. Bromley, Acting Divisional Officer for South Australia.)

The special feature of the past month has been the continued spell of cold and wet weather which has prevailed over the southern districts of this State. At Adelaide, from the 10th to the end of the month, rain was recorded on 19 of the 21 days, making a total of 22 wet days for July, or 5 more than the average, and the month's rain 3.51 in. (.94 in. above the average).

The month opened with fine and pleasant weather during the daytime, but severe frosts were recorded at night, and heavy morning fogs were general. A disturbance advancing from the west brought showery conditions on the 3rd, the rain being chiefly confined to the south and coastal districts, for it still remained fine and frosty in the north. A large anticyclone followed, and the weather again became fine throughout, but only temporarily, for a succession of low pressure waves now moved along the ocean, and under their influence the weather remained cold and showery over the southern areas during the remainder of the month. The centres of these waves kept well to the south until the last week, when they became more energetic, and brought intensely cold and stormy conditions over all the agricultural areas, and penetrating as far north as Beltana. Heavy rains and hail, accompanied by thunder-storms, were recorded more or less generally, and over the Mount Lofty Ranges and in the north heavy falls of snow took place.

The temperatures have been below the average throughout the State. At Adelaide the mean temperature tor the month was 49.3 deg., or 1.7 deg. below the average; the greatest departure from the normal occurring during the daytime, on account of the clouded skies and cold winds which prevailed, the mean maximum being 2 deg. below and the mean minimum 1.5 deg. below. The total number of hours' sunshine has been the lowest on record for July (97.1), the sun only shining on an average of a little over three hours per day.

The Month's Rainfall.
July will long be remembered for the continuously wet weather which prevailed. ... .

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752736
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940666
APA citation
JULY WEATHER. (1909, August 3). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved December 7, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752736 

End of "Widespread snowfall Thursday 29th July ..." report.

****************************************************

1909 August: Sunday-Monday 1st-2nd.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 5½

On October 30th 2017 I found on Trove and added two or three more records of snow, and I reviewed the rating of 5 that I originally gave this snowfall and changed it to 5½.



This Sunday-Monday 1st-2nd fall is the only snow event I found in August in a search of Trove.

There are reports of moderate to heavy snowfalls from several Mid-North towns and a report from Port Pirie "Snow was to be seen to-day on the summit of the Flinders Ranges—the first time it has been visible from the town this season". I also found one report from Mount Lofty, one from the Mt Barker district, and a report from Mt Gambier "It was coldest on Monday forenoon, when the thermometer mercury descended to 39deg., and some snow fell with the rain In a couple of the showers before 9 o'clock".

In the monthly weather bureau report for the month of August 1908 I quote from below, they say "The month opened with very cold and unsettled conditions, general rain falling over the agricultural areas, with heavy falls of snow in parts of the north and on the Mount Lofty Ranges."

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Thursday 2 September 1909, page 5
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5756198

{quoting only snow-relevant text}.

AUGUST WEATHER.
A RECORD WET MONTH.
(By Mr. E. Bromley, Acting Divisional Officer for South Australia.)

The past month may be ranked as one of the wettest in the history of South Australia.
... .
The month opened with very cold and unsettled conditions, general rain falling over the
agricultural areas, with heavy falls of snow in parts of the north and on the Mount Lofty
Ranges.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5756198
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page941004
APA citation
AUGUST WEATHER. (1909, September 2). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 5. Retrieved November 30, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5756198 

****************************************************

Below are weather maps from The Advertiser newspaper via Trove for Saturday 31st July and Monday 2nd August 1909 (there being no weather map produced on Sundays). These maps are presumably closely based on the government's weather office maps issued at 9am each day except Sundays.





****************************************************

Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919), Tuesday 3 August 1909, page 2
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/110257570

{quoting snow-relevant text from a longer article}
Dates below: Sunday is 1st August.
"Yesterday" is Monday 2nd August.

The Petersburg Times and Northern Advertiser
Tuesday, August 3, 1909.
GENERAL NEWS.

The Weather.— ... . A pretty fall of snow occurred on Sunday night, but owing to the dampness of the ground and the continued rain it thawed very quickly. Yesterday a further fall was witnessed and a deal of snowballing was indulged in.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article110257570
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10674544
APA citation
The Petersburg Times AND NORTHERN ADVERTISER (1909, August 3). Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919), p. 2. Retrieved December 5, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article110257570 

****************************************************

This article says as I interpret it "some snow fell with the rain in a couple of the showers" on Monday 2nd August 1909 in Mount Gambier.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), Wednesday 4 August 1909, page 2
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/77458156

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 4, 1909.
It was coldest on Monday forenoon, when the thermometer mercury descended to 39deg., and some snow fell with the rain in a couple of the showers before 9 o'clock.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77458156
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7670465
APA citation
The Border Watch, PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY MORNING. (1909, August 4). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 5, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77458156 

****************************************************

South Eastern Times (Millicent, SA : 1906 - 1954), Friday 6 August 1909, page 2.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/199996160

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

Penola.
We had a slight fall of snow here on Monday morning, which is about the first time it has been known in the town.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199996160
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22491280
APA citation
Penola. (1909, August 6). The South Eastern Times (Millicent, SA : 1906 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 30, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199996160

**********

In brief:

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Thursday 5 August 1909, page 6
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752968

MOUNT BRYAN, August 2.
... The high hills are still capped with snow.

MOUNT GAMBIER, August 2.
This morning there was a biting storm from the south-west, and with the rain which fell were large snowflakes, but melted before they could whiten the ground. The thermometer fell to 39 deg.

******************************************************

If the dates in this article below are correct, then from Port Pirie "... Snow was to be seen to-day on the summit of the Flinders Ranges ..." on Tuesday August 3rd. It's not clear from the report whether this snow fell on Monday 2nd or Tuesday 3rd. In another article further down this page it is reported "PORT PIRIE, August 2.—Yesterday the hills to the east of the town were capped with snow."

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 4 August 1909, page 8
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752883

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

RAIN AND FLOODS.
BROUGHTON COUNTRY UNDER WATER.
SNOW ON FLINDERS RANGES.

Port Pirie, August 3.
Snow was to be seen to-day on the summit of the Flinders Ranges—the first time it has been visible from the town this season.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752883
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940678
APA citation
RAIN AND FLOODS. (1909, August 4). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved December 1, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752883 

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Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), Saturday 7 August 1909, page 17
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/164686465

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

Our Correspondents' Letters

BELALIE NORTH, August 2.—Snow started to fall last evening and continued all the night. This morning it lay on the ground to a depth of 7 in. or 8 in., which is a record fall for this district.

CALTOWIE, August 2.—The heaviest snow experienced here fell this morning. From half-past 6 to 8 o'clock the feathery flakes fell incessantly, and all the surrounding hills are covered with a white mantle. The town is experiencing a repetition of the floods of last September.

HALLETT, August 2.—Snow began to fall on Sunday evening, and continued for about three hours. The average depth of snow was about one inch. Rain then com-menced and thawed the snow, although the hills are still thickly covered.

HORNSDALE, August 2.—The rain and hail were heavy last night. At 2 a.m. snow began, and was still falling at 7 o'clock. This morning the plains are covered, and the hills on the Mannanarie Range are white. The fall is heavier than on July 15. We had snow here on August 1 last year.

MELROSE, July 31.[This Mount Remarkable report refers to snow falling in the previous event - Miles]—There was a heavy fall of snow on Mount Remarkable on Thursday. It began early in the morning, and continued at intervals throughout the day. The snow was about a foot deep in the gullies. It was a pretty sight, much admired by residents.

PETERSBURG, August 2.—Last night snow commenced to fall at 7 o'clock, and continued for two hours, and was followed by a heavy shower of rain. Snow continued to fall at intervals until midday to-day, but there was not much lying about, owing to the damp nature of the ground.

PORT PIRIE, August 2.—Yesterday the hills to the east of the town were capped with snow.

TEROWIE, August 2.—The weather last week was exceptionally Stormy and cold. ... . Snow was falling last night about 7 o'clock, and churchgoers entered the various churches covered with the feathery flakes.

YONGALA, August 2.—Snow fell again yesterday and continued throughout the night. The ground was white this morning, and all the hills are still snowcapped.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164686465
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19116596
APA citation
The Country. Our Correspondents' Letters (1909, August 7). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 18. Retrieved December 15, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164686465 

********************************************
Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 2 August 1909, page 8

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5752659

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

MORE SNOW AT MOUNT LOFTY.

Heavy rain fell at Mount Lofty soon after 1.30 p.m. on Sunday, and continued intermittently till 4 o'clock, when snow began to fall. The soft flakes at first vanished as they touched the moisture-sodden earth, but soon they piled up till the landscape was covered with a light mantle of white. The fall lasted for about an hour. The snow, which had transfigured the trees and shrubs, did not remain long, as rain fell subsequently and washed out its traces.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752659
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page940654
APA citation
GENERAL NEWS (1909, August 2). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved December 4, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5752659 

****************************************************

In brief:

The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954) Fri 6 Aug 1909 Page 3
THE SOUTHERN DISTRICTS.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/147874800

On several days during July snow fell in the Mount Lofty Ranges, and on Sunday afternoon and Monday morning last flakes were noticed in the Mount Barker district. One of the severest frosts of this winter occurred on Thursday morning.

**********

End of "1909 August: Sunday-Monday 1st-2nd."

**********

3rd August to beginning of December - no reports of snow found.

**********

Below: This photo is in the State Library of South Australia's Clare Collection. It has the words "Snow at Spring Farm, Clare." printed on it, and in the information the library has published with the photo is the date "Approximately 1909". If the photo was published in a newspaper of the time as it may well have been, then a search of the newspapers of the time in the Trove database may find it. It does look to me like a photo likely to have been taken by a newspaper photographer or a local professional photographer. It's a mystery for someone to solve in the future.



Above photo: Source: State Library of South Australia.
Summary: Snow at Spring Farm
Date: Approximately 1909
Collection: Part of Clare Collection
Permanent link

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End of report.

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