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1908 - a very good year for snow in South Australia.

I don't think any other year I've investigated saw more snow events or more snowflakes fall than 1908. It's right up there anyway. There was one blockbuster event, two other big falls, a middle of the spectrum fall and about three minor or local events.

Two highlights of the year were one of our really big snowfalls on 21st-22nd June, and a rare "Monsoon Low" snowfall on 1st August.

Here are links to my reports below on each event:

Three biggest falls.

21st-22nd June: blockbuster snowfall starting here

1st August: Rare Mid-North and Flinders Ranges "Monsoon Low" snowfall starting here

19-20th September: another big snowfall starting here

A lesser but widely scattered fall.

13th and 14th September: some widely scattered snow showers starting here

Minor falls.

5th June 1908: Mount Lofty Ranges starting here

Friday 12th June 1908: near Petersburg starting here

Saturday 18th July: fall of snow reported from Hallett in Mid-North starting here

Saturday 25th July 1908 at Hallett and Mount Bryan (Mid-North) and Mount Brown (southern Flinders Ranges). starting here

Most of the newspaper articles and quotes from them presented below were found by searching the South Australian newspapers on the National Library of Australia's Trove website database for reports of snow from April 1st to December 10, using various keywords. The Sir Charles Todd Weather Folios online was also a valuable source of weather-related newspaper clips and most of the weather maps I've included below.

June 21st-22nd 1908 - one of our biggest snowfalls in recorded history.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 8 or 9

Below: snow storm at Peterborough on "23rd" June 1908 - very likely it was taken on the 22nd.


Here is information accompanying the copy of above photo in the State Library of South Australia. The photo was very likely taken on the 22nd.
Above photo: "Snow storm at Peterborough on 23rd June 1908".
Source: State Library of South Australia.
Photo B-27183
Permanent SLSA link: Permanent link B-27183

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Below: snow storm at Peterborough "23rd" June 1908 - very likely it was taken on the 22nd.


Here is information accompanying the copy of the above photo in the State Library of South Australia. The photo was very likely taken on the 22nd.
Above photo: Snow storm at Peterborough on 23rd June 1908
Source: State Library of South Australia.
Photo B-27343
Permanent SLSA link: Permanent link B-27343

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As it can be difficult to keep track of days and dates, here's a June 1908 calendar from timeanddate.com to refer to if needed. The key days are Sunday 21st and Monday 22nd.



Judging by the newspaper articles I've corrected on Trove and copied below, this could well have been in the top ten snowfalls in our recorded history! I'll be conservative and say in the top twenty anyway. In our more recent history there hasn't been a snowfall of this magnitude since before the year 2000, and maybe not since 1951.

Now to what the newspapers of the time reported on the snowfall.

Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Saturday 27 June 1908 Page 42
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/88382861

IN THE COUNTRY

Crystal Brook, June 21. A hailstorm, which passed over to-day, was the heaviest ever known in the district. It was followed by heavy rain, three-quarters of an inch being registered at 7 o'clock. The weather tonight is threatening.

Tanunda, June 22. The weather has been cold and boisterous since Saturday and there was a heavy fall of snow on the Barossa Ranges during Sunday night. Kaiser Stuhl and the surrounding hills are still covered with snow. Some enthusiastic residents have gone out to indulge in snowballing this afternoon.

Springton, June 22. Snow began to fall early this morning and continued for four hours. ...

Norton's Summit, June 22. The residents of the hills districts were favored with a beautiful sight on Monday morning. The snow had begun the previous evening, and had fallen steadily all the night, and morning dawn revealed a glistening spectacle. But a greater treat was yet in store when a snowstorm, lasting over two hours, occurred. The children on their way to school regarded the fall as high sport. Snowballing was the order of the day, and the children's shrieks of delight as they shook their coats and umbrellas added to the interest of the scene. The view from the top of the Ashton hill was magnificent, and away towards the Marble Hill Ranges the snow was much thicker. The viceregal residence had undergone a transformation. The creepers and ivy, which look so beautiful in the summer, carried festoons of snow, while the roof shone like a veritable English manor house. The snow this season evoked especial interest, as there had been no fall last year. Previous to last winter there had been snow for several successive years, and it began to bear that aspect of familiarity which prevents particular notice.

Truro, June 22. Very rough, squally weather prevailed here last night and 46 points of rain was registered. Snow fell here at intervals this morning, and the weather was extremely cold; heavy showers of rain were still falling at 3 p.m., and there has been a lighter fall on the Murray Flats.

Basket Range, June 22. Very heavy rains have been experienced here since Saturday afternoon. About 3 in. of rain had fallen up till Sunday night, and as a result the creeks are overflowing, and in some places the creek banks and garden soil have been washed away. In addition landslips have occurred on some parts of the roads.

Campbelltown, June 22. The heavy rains of the last day or two have caused all the creeks in this district to overflow and damage is reported in all directions. Several gardens have been inundated and plants and soil washed away. In many places the roads have been completely covered with floodwaters. On the road from Campbelltown to Magill at the Fourth Creek, where the stream is forded, a two-wheeled vehicle on Sunday was swept off the roadway and carried through the fence. The horse was extricated by a number of men. A number of drivers on arrival at the spot preferred not to risk crossing the stream until it had subsided, and were obliged to turn back without completing their journey.

Elliston, June 22. The heaviest rain in the district for over 20 years fell on Saturday and Sunday, Elliston registering 215 points, Talia 277, and Colton 170 points During the fortnight the average rainfall was 5 in., throughout the district. Water is lying everywhere, and some houses and the Elliston Institute and post-office are surrounded, although not flooded. Much damage has been done to the roads. Several houses in the town of Bramfield are reported to have been flooded. The weather is still showery.

Crystal Brook, June 22. Another hailstorm passed over at 4 o'clock this morning, and was heavier than the one on Sunday afternoon. Nearly 2 in. of rain fell. The rain has been heavy throughout the district.

Brinkworth, June 22 9.23 a.m. Heavy rain fell here all day Sunday and during last night, an inch and forty points being registered. There is every appearance of more rain.

Kingston, June 23. Heavy weather has prevailed along the coast since Thursday. Four inches of rain have fallen in four days. Reports from inland show that the lagoons and lowlands are flooded. The schooner Monarch, which sailed to Port Augusta from here, with a cargo of sleepers, returned for shelter, and went ashore at Grassy Flat, nine miles west of Kingston, having dragged two anchors over a mile. The vessel floated off on Friday, and anchored in deep water half a mile from shore, but was again struck by a heavy squall, and was driven aground. The cargo will have to be unloaded before the schooner can be refloated. There are no rocks on this part of the coast, but the vessel bumped heavily while drifting ashore, and it is thought likely that she has suffered damage. The schooner is now awaiting means of lightering the cargo. She is doomed to delay, as there have been storms ever since her arrival, over a fortnight ago. Fishermen are lending all the assistance possible.

PETERSBURG, June 22.—The heaviest fall of snow on record here occurred last night and this morning. The weather on Saturday and Sunday had been bitterly cold, and about 10 o'clock on Sunday night those who were unfortunate or hardy enough to be outside noticed that sleet was falling. The weather grew perceptibly colder, and about midnight snow fell in earnest, continuing without intermission until about 8 o'clock this morning, after which it fell at intervals during the day. As far as the eye can reach everything is covered with a thick mantle of snow, which even in the most exposed and level places is never less than four or five inches in depth, while in some places it is heaped up a depth of a foot or more. Some of the young trees and shrubs, the limbs of which were already rendered brittle by the excessive cold of the past few weeks, have lost branches by reason of the heavy weight of snow. The roofs of the houses, the windowsills, and any crevice or hollow is covered deep, and the railway lines are completely obliterated. The drivers have had a good deal of difficulty in distinguishing the signals against the white background, and also find it hard to keep to time on account of the slipperyness of the rails and the necessity for forcing their way through several inches of snow. The ranges in the distance look exceedingly beautiful when the sun is shining. Snowballing, of course, is general, and trade is almost suspended. Even the most staid business men appear to have dropped 20 years and are frolicking with the youngest. Neither is spared, and if any unlucky individual shows annoyance he is singled out for special attention for the roysterers.

Photographers are busy, as also are the makers of snowmen. In fact, everybody is laying in a supply of chillblains and colds. The milk supply suffered this morning, as many of the cows which were unprotected by stables or rugs gave no milk. There is every indication of more snow, and the weather is bitterly cold.

LYNDOCH, June 22.—The adjacent hills were this morning capped with snow which had fallen during the night. They presented a beautiful spectacle when the clouds lifted and the sun shone on the white surface.

GULNARE June 22.—On Sunday evening heavy dark clouds gathered in the west, and this morning the ground was white with snow. The Bundaleer hills presented a lovely appearance. Old residents said it was the heaviest fall ever experienced here.

NAIRNE. June 22.—Snow has fallen frequently during the day, and the falls have been heavy, but on account of the rain it has not remained on the ground long. Some of the hills looked beautifully white, and the young people enjoyed the pastime of snowballing.

BALHANNAH, June 22.—Snow has been falling at intervals all day.

MOUNT TORRENS, June 22.—At about 7 a.m. to-day snow began to fall, and it continued until eleven o'clock, when the sun shone out. The country all round was coated fully 2 in. thick. Outdoor work was out of the question, and so snowballing was freely indulged in, while large snow balls and snowwheels were made on the hillsides.

OAKBANK. June 22.—To-day there have been continual falls of snow, but it melted as soon as it touched the ground.

ALDGATE, June 22,—Early this morning a beautiful fall of snow took place, and was watched by residents, some of the younger generation indulging in snowballing. Several nice falls have taken place during the day.

BELALIE NORTH, June 22.—One of the heaviest snowstorms experienced for 20 years took place last night. The earth was covered with 6 in. of snow this morning.

BURRA, June 22.—When residents got up this morning they found the whole country covered with snow, and there were further falls up to 11 o'clock. The fall locally was not so heavy as that of some previous years, but there was plenty of ammunition for snowballing.

TEROWIE, June 22.—After several days of extremely cold weather a heavy fall of snow was experienced last night, and this morning the country side had a beautiful carpet of white. It has been snowing off and on all the morning. Snowballing was entered into with vigor, and pedestrians were assailed on every hand.

HOUGHTON, June 22.—This morning snow began to fall about 7 o'clock, and continued almost without a break for two hours. Unfortunately the ground was so wet that the snow thawed as soon as it touched the earth. Heavy hail showers have been falling all day, but doing little damage.

TARCOWIE, June 22.—Snow is falling, and the whole place for miles is a picture of white. It started at 6 o'clock this morning.

CHAIN OF PONDS, June 22.—During last night and this morning there have been some heavy falls of snow, many of the hills being covered, and presenting a most pic- turesque appearance.

MEADOWS SOUTH, June 22.—A heavy fall of snow occurred here during last night, the landscape being covered with a beautiful mantle of white, which was visible on the hills for two or three hours after day broke. Several heavy showers have since fallen, and owing to the amount of water about the snow soon disappeared

MOUNT BARKER, June 22.—Snow fell here to-day.

BULL'S CREEK, June 22.—This morning snow was thick on the ranges.

ORROROO, June 22.—It is bitterly cold. Snow fell this morning for about an hour, and the hills all round were clothed In white.

SEVENHILLS, June 22.—After the recent cold weather it was not surprising to see the ground covered with snow at day break this morning. It lasted until about 9 o'clock, and then fell again at intervals until noon, but it made no further impression on the ground. The snow was accompanied by heavy rain and some hail. It is still cold, with every indication of more snow.

YONGALA, June 22.—The residents of the town and district this morning were astonished to find that the ground was covered with snow, which began to fall about 2 o'clock, and continued till 7.30 a.m. On an average the depth was fully 3 in. The streets were soon alive with snowballers and photographers, who endeavored to make the best of a rare sight, many fine snapshots being obtained. The rain registered was 50 points, of which about 40 were represented by melted snow. About 10 o'clock a good quantity had melted, which formed large streams, and flooded the streets. The appearance of the weather promises further falls, so that a bountiful season seems assured.

GEORGETOWN, June 22—The residents of Georgetown were surprised to find that during the night there had been a heavy fall of snow. The surrounding country was entirely covered, the hills presenting a beautiful appearance. Snowballing, an unusual thing in the north, caused great amusement among the younger members of the population.

MOUNT BRYAN. June 22.—On Sunday about 9.30 p.m. snow commenced to fall, and it continued during the night. The country presents a beautiful sight.

MONARTO SOUTH, June 22.—The much-needed rain has come at last. Since 6 p.m. on Saturday an intermittent rain has fallen which will do the crops much good and set the farmers fallowing. Not withstanding several weeks of comparatively rainless though boisterous weather, the crops are in a flourishing condition. A peculiar feature of the season is the absence of the usual heavy rains which flood the creeks and fill the dams. Mr. R. Hartmann has just completed a very large dam, which when filled will provide a big supply of water for himself and his neighbors.

SHERINGA, June 19.—Good rains have again fallen throughout the week, being ac- companied by heavy hailstorms. Lambing is general, and the squatters anticipate a fair percentage.

GRUNTHAL, June 22.—During the last few days rain has fallen almost continuously. On Sunday last the Onkaparinga Rivcr came down a banker. Trees of no small size were torn out by the roots and hurled down the stream. Occasionally a rabbit was to be seen vainly struggling to get out of the water. No serious damage was done by the floodwaters. In a large paddock immediately in front of the local hotel a lake of considerable dimensions has been created during the past few days. In this paddock stock are running and the owner is entertaining considerable anxiety concerning their safety. This lake generally forms every winter. Today several falls of snow have been experienced. The falls, however, were not heavy; in fact, it was hardly more than sleet. The hills around Murdoch's Hill, six miles distant, are now covered with a heavy fall of snow.

TUNGKILLO June 22.—A fall of snow was witnessed here today, and at 11 o'clock the ground was covered to a depth of from 3 to 5 in. Some large snowballs were made, and young and old engaged in snowball throwing.

EDEN VALLEY, June 22. — A snow-storm was witnessed here today. The fall began at 7.30 a.m. and continued till 10 o'clock without intermission, the depth of snow on the main road being over 2 in. Several lighter falls occurred during the day. The South Rhine River is running strongly, also the creeks in and about here. The cold weather is severe on the stock.

GUMERACHA, June 22. — All the low-lying country is covered with water. Farmers will be unable to get on the land for some days. Snow fell all this morning, but melted as soon as it touched the ground.

ECHUNGA, June 22. — For the past five days heavy rains, accompanied by hail, have fallen. All tilling operationns are at a standstill for the present, as low-lying land has been covered with water. Snow fell at intervals to-day.

JAMESTOWN, June 22. — The residents of this town on Monday morning had a lovely view on rising from their slumber, for during the early hours a record fall of snow had taken place. In the town the fall was about 3 in. deep, while at Canowie, Mount Lock, and Bundaleer the fall was reckoned to be fully a foot deep. Snowballing was indulged, in. At the district council office there were six large balls heaped upon one another, standing folly 6 ft. high. Rain set in during the day, and most of the snow soon disappeared.

YARCOWIE, June 22.— Yesterday was very cold and stormy. Snow began to fall at night, and, continued till early morning. The snow covered the ground to a depth of about 5 in. A few indulged in snowballing.

MARRABEL, June 22.—Since Saturday the weather has been exceptionally cold and wet. Snow fell last night, and the residents had the pleasure of witnessing a heavy fall about midday to-day. Snow fell thickly for about half an hour.

HALLETT, June 22.—A fine fall of snow, about 6 in., was experienced here last night. It was the heaviest known by the oldest residents of the district. There were two or three heavy falls, during the day, and it is still snowing (8.30 p.m.). The hills and gullies are a pretty sight. It will be bad for the stock, and especially for the lambs, as a great number will perish. The sparrows and small birds are lying around the houses dead.

MELROSE, June 22.—After the heavy hail squalls of Sunday evening, and the piercing cold of the atmosphere, residents of Melrose were not surprised to see the top of Mount Remarkable crowned with snow this morning. The fall had been so heavy that the gullies and slopes for hundreds of feet down were covered with the white mass. The weather continues so extremely cold that it is probable there will be another fall this evening.

MOUNT BRYAN EAST, June 22.—The snow is a dazzling sight to-day, there being a complete mantle of white everywhere. There were heavy falls all night and this morning, and cattle, horses, and sheep are travelling about trying to find dry places to feed upon. The snow remained on the flats all day long, and will be seen on the ranges of Mount Bryan for several weeks, as it lies 6 and 7 ft. deep. During the storm native birds sought protection under verandahs.

WOODCHESTER, June 23.—A splendid rain set in here on Saturday night. Up till noon on Monday 1¾ in. had been recorded. This fall was most acceptable, as owing to the dryness many farmers had to suspend fallowing operations. The early-sown crops are making rapid headway, and feed is plentiful."

"Article identifier http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88382861
Page identifier http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8506962
APA citation
IN THE COUNTRY. (1908, June 27). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 42. Retrieved June 12, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88382861"

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More on the 1908 June 21st-22nd snow event.

Source: Trove at http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56868421

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 23 June 1908 Page 5

Below is an article from The Register on the snowfall of June 22nd 1908. At the beginning of this article there is an eyewitness account of a train journey in the Mid-North during the snowfall.

"SNOW IN THE NORTH.

TRAIN DELAYED.

Passengers who travelled by the Broken Hill express which arrived in Adelaide on Monday morning had an exhilarating experience. Mr. Coombe. M.P., who travelled from the Silver City, states:—"When we emerged from the narrow gauge train at Terowie after an extremely cold night we found snow an inch deep on the railway platform, and the feathery flakes were still falling. Two youths who had walked a mile or two to the station had their hats and shoulders well capped with the snowy down, and railway employes were similarly adorned. The fields on either side of the line were carpeted with white, which glimmered faintly in the dim moonlight. At Yarcowie, the next station, the train was pulled up outside the home signal, and had to wait two or three minutes. The explanation was that a snowdrift extended from a pile of sleepers across the line and covered the points. The porter would not let the train in until he had shovelled the deposit from the rails and seen that the points were right. At Uloolo, Hallett, and Mount Bryan, high-level stations, the snow was two inches deep on the flat platforms, while there were deposits feet deep in favorable situations. As the dawn appeared the sight was magnificent. The foliage of trees was beautifulv tipped with snow on the leeward side. Creepers and pot plants in front of houses were converted into curtains of white. Stables, haystacks, wood heaps, &c were similarly adorned. Sheep herded together, and presented fleeces whiter than their own native coats. The engine's cow-catcher and wheels gathered a considerable accumulation of the crystal substance, and the roofs of carriages were similarly whitened. The fields were thickly coated, and the hills in the distance fairly glistened. Snow continued to fall until Hallett was reached. The name boards at Hallett and Mount Bryan were literally plastered with snow and unreadable. Snow-balling was indulged in at several of the stations. Burra was within the snow zone, but the deposit was not so pronounced, while Farrell's Flat was on the extreme edge of the storm area." Mr. M. Eyres, the driver of the express, says that this is the fifth snowstorm he has experienced on the railway lines in South Australia during the last 26 years, and the present visitation he regards as the most severe since one which came along 24 years ago. In the old country he had an adventure of a sensational character. He was snowed up for three days and three nights on a pilot engine, and had to be dug out by a snow plough.

AUBURN, June 22.—Snow and hail fell at about half-past 1. A little snow-balling was indulged in.

BRlNKWORTH, June 22.— Snow fell to the eastward in the hills yesterday.

BURRA. June 22.— This morning at daylight the landscape presented a pretty appearance in a mantle of snow. The Burra hills presented the appearance of huge icebergs. A portion of the morning was taken up in snowballing.

CALTOWIE, June 22.— There was a fine fall of snow last night, and a beautiful spectacle was presented this morning. The Mount Lock, Neva Neva, and Bundaleer Ranges are now heavily capped, while the adjoining gullies are several feet deep in drift snow.

COWELL, June 22.—Very heavy rain fell last night and this morning. The prospects for a good year are exceedingly bright.

EUDUNDA, June 22.—Shortly after 9 o'clock this morning snowflakes commenced to fall, and they fell for about half an hour. The sight while it lasted was a pretty one.

GEORGETOWN, June 22—Last night a heavy fall of hail occurred. This morning the scene was a pretty one. The whole plain was covered; in many places was some inches in depth.

HALLETT, June 22.— There was a heavy fall of snow last night. The ground was covered 6 in. everywhere, and in places the snow drifted to a depth of several feet. It is the heaviest fall experienced here. Branches of trees were broken off.

JAMESTOWN. June 22.— This morning as far as the eye can see the whole place is covered with snow. The fall has been a heavy one. The Bundaleer Ranges and other adjacent hills are enveloped in a beautiful white mantle. The trees in the Bundaleer Forest and the parks adjacent to the town had a pretty appearance. House tops and all building roofs were covered, and the streets had a thick coating over them. All classes of the community engaged in snowballing, and business for the time being was suspended.

LOBETHAL. June 22.—Snow began to fall early this morning, and continued all day at intervals. The hills presented a pretty picture. Snowballing was taken up by the young folk.

MEADOWS SOUTH. June 22—We have had a fall of snow last night, and this morning the hills were covered. Throughout the morning, snow has fallen, but owing to the heavy rain it melted quickly, except in sheltered places.

MOUNT BARKER. June 22.—A little snow has fallen to-day.

MOUNT PLEASANT, June. 22.— There was a three hours' fall of snow this morning. All the surrounding country is white. It is the heaviest fall since 1901.

MANNANARIE, June 22.—Snow began to fall this morning about 6 o'clock, and continued for about two hours, when the country presented a beautiful appearance.

MOUNT TORRENS, June 22.—This morning there was a change in events, and snow began to fall. It was first noticed at about a quarter past 7, and continued until 11 o'clock, when the sun began to shine, and the snow melted. The country all around for miles was one sheet of white. and the snow lay fully 2 in. thick upon the ground. Outdoor work was abandoned, and snowballing took its place.

MANOORA. June 22.—The residents have been somewhat compensated for the severe cold by witnessing several light falls of snow.

OODLA WIRRA. June 21—An inch of snow fell during the night, and transformed the whole place into a wonderfully white world, tranrformed as though Hans Andersen's fairy folk had been at work.

ORROROO. June 22.—This morning when the mist cleared away the hills around the town were seen to be covered with snow. As the sun shone out these snow-clad hills in the distance afforded a beautiful sight.

PETERSBURG. June 22.— The heaviest fall of snow recorded here occurred last night, and continued this morning. The ground is, at 11 a.m., covered as far as the eye can reach with a thick carpet of white, in places over a foot deep, while even in the most exposed and level places it is never less than 3 to 4 in. in depth. Some of the young thick-foliaged trees, the limbs of which were already brittle by reason of the intense cold experienced lately. have had their branches broken by the weight of snow. Snowballing is general, and the making of snowmen is responsible for the absence of many children from school. Trade is almost at a standstill and even the most staid business men are out laying in a stock of colds and chilblains. The snowballers have no respect for age or sex, and those who show that they do not appreciate the attentions of the merry-makers get rather a bad time.

ROSEWORTHY, June 22.— Snow was plainly visible on the Barossa Ranges until 12 o'clock to-day. It is a distance of 12 miles from here.

SEVENHILLS. June 22.— At daybreak the country presented a lovely appearance, covered with a mantle of snow, which had not completely melted until 9 o'clock. Al-though snow fell at intervals until midday it was not sufficiently heavy to be seen on the ground.

SOUTH ROAD. June 21.—The heavy rains which fell on Saturday and Sunday caused a big flood in the Sturt and neighbouring creeks. At Morphettville the flood was awash with the railway line, and spread over the Morphettvile road and parts of the Bay road. This necessitated the embankments of the line being watched throughout the day. Low-lying lands are submerged.

TEROWIE. June 22.— Residents here wcre not surpriseded this morning to find the ground covered with a thick carpet of snow. The hills, trees, and fences presented a pretty sight. The fall does not appear to be as deep as the previous one. but the snow is remaining longer on the ground.

TANUNDA, June 22.—Heavy rain fell yesterday all day, consequently the rivers and the lowlying grounds are flooded. It was bitterly cold this morning, and the Barossa Ranges were covered with a beautiful white sheet of snow.

URAIDLA. June 22.— This morning we had an exceptionally heavy snowstorm for about three hours. It is a record snowstorm for this district for many years.

WHYTE-YARCOWIE. June 22.— A heavy full of snow occurred last night, and has continued during today till noon. The hills and surroundings are snowclad.

YACKA, June 22.— This morning the hills a few miles east of the township were capped with snow. One range known as Mount Watts was practically covered, and afforded a splendid sight.

YONGALA. June 22.—Snow fell during the night, and the ground is covered to a depth of about 3 in. {end of article}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56868421
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4436748
APA citation
SNOW IN THE NORTH. (1908, June 23). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved June 20, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56868421

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More on the 1908 June 21st-22nd snow event.

This short article I found on the Trove website is from the Burra Record. It refers to the snow that fell on the night of Sunday June 21st and on Monday 22nd 1908.

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 24 June 1908 Page 3 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37332182

"Mount Bryan.
June 22.
A sudden change took place in the weather at about 9 o'clock last night (after a good soaking rain during the day) when snow commenced to fall heavily, and in less than half an hour the ground was covered, and snow-balling was one of the main features of the evening though it was dark. It was quite a novelty to some of the new settlers for they never before saw such a thing as a snowstorm. The snow averaged from three inches to two feet, and much deeper in the hills and gullies. So far there has not been any reports received of stock being frozen, but birds and poultry are apparen:ly having a rough time of it, and fowls are being pickrd up in various yards completely paralyzed. It is believed that next Wednesday will witness one of the largest crowds ever assembled in this locality, as a big land sale will be held here on that day, and a meeting in connection with the building of a new district hall, etc."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37332182
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756966
APA citation
Mount Bryan. (1908, June 24). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved June 26, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37332182

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The following article from the Burra Record I found on Trove refers to the snow that fell on Sunday night 21st June and on Monday 22nd June 1908, and to the scene that presented itself on Wednesday 24th June at the big land sale in Mt Bryan referred to in the previous article above.: "The snow that fell two days before was still covering the caps of the ranges for miles along the line without a break, while in the distance could be seen the Razorback and Mount Bryan bearing their white clad load".

In the first sentence of this article ie "Without doubt the grandest sight to Australians was to be seen between Burra and Hallett on Wednesday", the Wednesday referred to is June 24th. And in the next sentence, "The snow that fell two days before" refers to the snowfall on Monday June 22nd.

About the following comment in the article: "There is still rare sights to be seen as the snow has not disappeared from the ranges, and it is likely to remain there for some time yet", the article itself has no date of writing on it so I don't think there's a way to determine when the article was written and so establish when that particular observation was made.

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 1 July 1908 Page 2
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37333016

"A Picturesque Sight.

Without doubt the grandest sight to Australians was to be seen between Burra and Hallett on Wednesday. The snow that fell two days before was still covering the caps of the ranges for miles along the line without a break, while in the distance could be seen the Razorback and Mount Bryan bearing their white clad load, and the sight of the latter was a spectacle of beauty, and could not be beaten from a snow scene point of view even in Switzerland, where the greatest sights in the world are said to exist. Passengers in the train were struck with amazement at the heavy fall of snow, and the glorious and never-to-be-for gotten sight it provided for travellers to and from the north. The large assemblage at the land sale at Mount Bryan, which comprised gentlemen from all parts of the world (at one time or another) declared that the sight of the snow clad hills and rugged ranges had no equal so far as they knew. There was no casual glance at the brilliant spectacle — everyone looked on the sight for a considerable time, and were sorry when the time arrived for them to take their departure. There is still rare sights to be seen as the snow has not disappeared from the ranges, and it is likely to remain there for some time yet. The fall of snow at Mount Bryan last week was the heaviest on record."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37333016
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756969
APA citation
A Picturesque Sight. (1908, July 1). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved June 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37333016

*********************************************************

Here's another short article from the Burra Record I found on Trove. As the article has no date of writing on it I don't know on what date it was written.

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 1 July 1908 Page 2
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37333010

"The Weather.
There is but little doubt that the past week as far as Burra is concerned was a record cold one, the oldest residents vowing that they do not remember anything like it. "We have had cold days and cold nights," said one, "but nothing approaching this extremely cold weather, especially in the absence of rain." The sun has been backward since the fall of snow, and with the exceptional soaking the ground received through its fall the atmosphere was decidedly keen. On Tuesday morning the most severe frost known presented itself on the ground, and remained there the best part of the morning, and in the shade it remained all day, and assisted to make the fall more severe on Wednesday night. The hills presented the appearance of a fall of snow in the early morn, and from all parts of the district we are told that the frosts of the past week have no equal. The water in the taps was frozen, and where hot water was not applied pumps could not be worked, while in the creeks the water was frozen to such an extent that children could run upon the ice."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37333010
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756969
APA citation
The Weather. (1908, July 1). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved June 25, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37333010

*************************************************

The following brief article from the Burra Record via Trove, has the date June 28th which is a Sunday and is about a week after the night of Sunday June 21st when the June 21st-22nd snowfall commenced. If this observation "Snow is still to be seen several feet thick on the Razorback Ranges, and patches here and there along the creeks on the Flat" is correct then the snow referred to lay on the ground from Monday 22nd to Sunday 28th.

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 1 July 1908 Page 3
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37333026

"Mount Bryan.
June 28.
Jack Frost is still playing a cool game out this way. Since the snowstorm the air has been particularly keen, and old residents say it is the coldest few days that they remember. Snow is still to be seen several feet thick on the Razorback Ranges, and patches here and there along the creeks on the Flat. Emus have put in an appearance on the Razorback Ranges."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37333026
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756970
APA citation
Mount Bryan. (1908, July 1). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved June 24, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37333026

All the above articles from the Burra Post are Trove's electronic digital versions made from copies of newspapers of the day, after I have searched them for errors (made during Trove's scanning and digitising process) and corrected them.

***********************************************************

Here's a rather poetic article I found on the Trove website on this June 21st-22nd 1908 snowfall in the Adelaide Hills.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929)
Tuesday 23 June 1908 Page 5 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56868426

SNOW IN THE MOUNT LOFTY RANGES

BEAUTIFUL SIGHTS.

The snowfall in the Mount Lofty Ranges on Monday will always be remembered as one of the heaviest and most beautiful ever witnessed in those parts. The white capped hills were plainly visible from the city, but one had to be on the spot to realise the exquisite effect the white flakes imparted to the landscape. It was intensely cold on Sunday, and as families gathered closer round their firesides they remarked—'Cold enough for snow.' As a matter of fact it was snowing in the ranges on Sunday evening. It began to fall heavily early on Monday, and the representatives of The Register and the photographer of The Observer, who went to Mount Lofty in a motor car, were caught in a magnificent snowstorm at the summit a little after 1 p.m. From Crafers onwards armies of jubilant boys and girls posted themselves, and they pelted the visitors in the passing vehicles with hearty goodwill. When there was a lull in the motor and horse traffic they threw at one another just to keep their hands in, as it were. There is no harm in an ordinary snow ball, but some of the throwers hammered the snow together until it became almost of the consistency of ice, and a ball weighing half a dozen pounds hit one gentleman in the head, and made him feel very queer and dizzy. Numerous snow men, from a few feet up to 7 and 8 ft. high, were built in the various gardens, while snowballs were rolled along the ground until they developed an unwieldy size. These were encountered in several places right in the middle of the road. Residents in the hills say that it was the heaviest fall that has been experienced. It was lying about the ground several inches thick, while hedges, logs of wood, tops of posts, and the eastern side of the tree trunks were mantled with white. It was a glorious sensation to be in the snow. The falling flakes of all shapes and sizes, and thick as thick could be, seemed to warm the atmosphere and make it a joy just to be alive and breathe the pure air. It did not take long for one, especially with a rough coat on, to become literally powdered with snow. It was a lovely sight to see purple pansies peeping up through the pure white covering and robin redbreasts hopping about looking for any trace of insect life. Their little scarlet breasts against the white ground were a thing of beauty indeed. At Mount Lofty a great big St. Bernard dog rolled and revelled in the snow. His long shaggy coat gathered the falling flakes, and when he was literally white he would shake himself, and while the powdery particles flew off in all directions he would bark for joy. The motor car with The Regis- ter representatives went up into 'the mountain,' as visitors call our hills, via the Eale-on-the-Hill—the eagle looked cold and miserable— and returned down the Greenhill road. Creeks, waterfalls, and rivulets raced and tumbled along in all directions. It was beautiful when the sun came out and made prismatic colours in the particles of white. Then a rainbow flung itself through the falling snow and made a superb picture. The black trunks of the peppermint gums set off the white, and the snow fell in blobs from the leaves above. But the eucalypti did not appear to advantage in the snow. They seemed to be weeping for the return of hot sun-shiny, summer days. The laurel leaves gathered the flakes quite lovingly. The bracken ferns were thrown up in bold relief, the heather reared its scarlet head in esstasy, but the vegetation which nursed and caressed the snow most tenderly were the pinetrees. Their foliage was covered in white, and as the snow thawed crystal drops of water which shone like myriads of diamonds fell to the ground. Summertown and Uraidla enjoyed the fall, while looking away east of Mount Lofty a great tablecloth of white could be seen 15 to 20 miles away. During the outing rain, hail, snow, and sleet were experienced. Many times the question was asked—'What is the difference between hail and snow?' Hail is 'frozen rain or particles of ice falling from the clouds.' Snow is 'the crystalline form into which the excess of vapour in the atmosphere is condensed when the temperature is below freezing— not like hail, or sleet, frozen rain, but formed directly by the invisible aqueous vapour condensing in minute spacules of ice round the dust particles that float in the air.' Sleet 'is rain mingled with snow or hail.'

— Snow and Foxes.— The snow and the imported trees and scrubs transformed Mount Lofty into a veritable English winter scene. To give colour to it robin redbreasts were hopping about, and foxes were in the neighbourhood, as the following letter, written by Mr. P. Wilkinson, at Eurilla, the residence of Lady Milne, to the Editor of The Register, on Monday morning, will show:— 'We have snow and foxes at Mount Lofty. Mr. Robert Whittingham, of Arthur's Seat, caught one fox on Saturday morning, and another this morning, both vixens. This morning we have a splendid fall of snow. All the scrub and shrubs are beautifully covered. It is well worth a drive from Adelaide to see the lovely sight. The snow started last night about 7 o'clock, and at 10.40 this morning it is still snowing. This has been the wettest June for the last 13 years. From the 1st until this morning at 8.30 I have registered over 11¾ in. of rain.'
{end of article}

Acknowledgment: This article on Trove was corrected to a high level of accuracy from the original electronic version by "judithl" :smile:

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56868426
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4436748
APA citation
SNOW IN THE MOUNT LOFTY RANGES. (1908, June 23). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved May 27, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56868426

*****************************************************************************

Below: Miscellaneous screengrabs from the Sir Charles Todd weather folios. There's plenty more to explore on the Todd folios website, and to find the relevant folio pages go to this index page and proceed from there.

The snow fell on Sunday night and Monday 21st-22nd. I'm pretty sure the weather office was following the usual practice and didn't produce a weather map on Sunday 21st. Their 9am Monday 22nd map shows a high centred over southern Western Australia and a low centre near Tasmania, with a south-westerly airflow between them. Insofar as I can tell, this looks to me like a typical snow-producing surface chart scenario for southern South Australia. We may never know why it produced such an extraordinary amount of snow. The source of the image is this Todd folios page. {The 9am Saturday 20th weather map is on this page - use back button to return here.}

Below: Todd folios weather chart dated 9am Monday 22nd June.


Below: "The "Herald" Map" dated 9am 22nd June.


Below: Todd folios newspaper clipping (in two sections):
Source: The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Mon 22 Jun 1908 Page 6
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5153632





Below: Todd folios newspaper clipping (in three sections):
Source: The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tue 23 Jun 1908 Page 8 http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5154068







************************************************************

The following two newspaper reports were written well after this snowfall - from Mount Bryan East on July 11th and from Spalding on July 20th, and presumably they refer to snow that fell during the June 21-22nd event as I haven't found any intervening snowfalls between 22nd June and 20th July.

Below: screen-grab from the Trove image of the newspaper article quoted from below.



Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Fri 24 Jul 1908 Page 6
Burra District Letters

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/132365514

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

MOUNT BRYAN EAST.
July 11.
—Snow.—
Snow was to be seen eighteen days after the recent heavy fall on the Mount Bryan ranges.

Article identifier

Page identifier

Burra District Letters (1908, July 24). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 6. Retrieved February 27, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132365514

********************************************************

Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), Friday 24 July 1908, page 3
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/132365442

SPALDING.
July 20. —The Season.—
The weather is very wet, cold, and frosty. The feed is backward and so is the wheat. We had our share of the snow. It was to be soen on the Canowie hills for weeks.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132365442
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10568060
APA citation
SPALDING. (1908, July 24). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved February 27, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132365442 

Below: a map from Bonzle.com I've added to show the location of the "Mt Bryan ranges" and the approximate location of the "Canowie hills" mentioned in the articles above. To find the "Mount Bryan ranges" find Burra at the bottom right hand corner of the map and follow the dark red line northwards (it's the highway from Burra to Broken Hill) till you come to "Hallett" (a town). The "tt" of Hallett is in the Mount Bryan Range. Due west of the town of Hallett you can see the name "Canowie" in pink, and at the same location is "Old Canowie" not shown on this map. There's also "Canowie Belt" which is between Jamestown near the top-centre of the map and Terowie near the top right corner of the map. I don't see any "Canowie hills" on Bonzle maps so I suppose it's most likely to be one of the ranges of hills in the vicinity of one of the Canowie locations I've mentioned.



The search for relevant articles on Trove was not exhaustive so there's more information to be gleaned there. And there's more information also on the Sir Charles Todd weather folios webpages.

End of my report on the June 21st-22nd 1908 snowfall.

************************************************************

Now to another big 1908 snowfall.

Saturday 1st August 1908: Rare Mid-North and Flinders Ranges "Monsoon Low" snowfall.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 6 or 7

Calendar for July and August 1908. Source: timeanddate.com


On Saturday 1st August 1908 we saw one of the most unusual snowfall events in South Australia's recorded history. It is by a long stretch the most extensive snowfall I've found yet that wasn't due to a deep and very cold surface to upper level airstream coming up from the Southern Ocean.

Snowfalls were reported widely from the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges districts, but I was unable to find any reports from further south in the central and southern Mount Lofty Ranges.

The primary cause of the snowfall was (as far as I can ascertain) attributed by the government weather experts at the time to a deepening "monsoonal low" which was centred over the central eastern Northern Territory at 9am on Friday 31st July and over the Far North-East of South Australia and the Far South-West of Queensland at 9am on Saturday 1st August (the day of the South Australian snowfall), and by 9am Monday 3rd was a deep and stormy low just off the New South Wales coast.

Below is a sequence of 9am weather maps published in newspaper(s) from Friday 31st July to Monday 3rd August except for Sunday 2nd. They are newspaper versions of the official government weather maps issued at 9am each day except on Sundays. I've copied the maps from the Todd folios webpages for those days. The official government maps are also on those pages and I've copied the ones for 9am Saturday and 9am Monday below. The newspaper maps are easier on the eye and considerably less animated and less faded than the government originals which is why I've copied the whole sequence of newspaper versions.

There are also a variety of newspaper clippings on the Todd folios pages reporting on the weather and related stories as the low progressed from the Northern Territory to the Tasman Sea. And on the Trove website I'm sure there are an abundance of newspaper articles to explore in Queensland and New South Wales and Victorian newspapers for those interested. I only searched among the South Australian newspapers in the Trove database.

I haven't investigated the weather resulting in the eastern states from the passage of this system eastwards, but I see in the newspaper clipping below it says Sydney received almost 14 inches of rain in an eight day period. It seems that the majority of the rain fell in a rain event from 9am Monday 27th July to 9am Wednesday 29th July, well before the low arrived on the scene. I speculate there was a relationship between the earlier rain event and the "monsoonal low" rain event.

I wasn't able to find any scientific reports on this weather event published on the internet but there may be one somewhere in the meteorological literature.

Here's the abovementioned newspaper clipping with a handwritten 3 on it suggesting it was published on 3rd August. I sourced it from this Todd folio page.. I've been unable to figure out the precise dates and times from the clipping.







There's a corrected digital version of the "Some Rain Records" part of the above article at the following address on Trove: Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), Wednesday 5 August 1908, page 326 "Some Rain Records". Please do check it on Trove against the original newspaper image if you need 100% certified accuracy.

Now, here's the sequence of 9am weather maps from Friday 31st July to Monday 3rd August.

Below: newspaper weather map dated (Thursday) 30th July 1908 from newspaper clipping on Todd folio page for 30th July 1908 on this page.



Below: newspaper weather map dated (Friday) 31st July 1908 from newspaper clipping on Todd folio page for 31st July 1908 on this page.



Below: government weather map dated 9am Saturday 1st August 1908 from Todd folios on this page.



Below: a newspaper version of the weather map dated (Saturday) 1st August from a newspaper cutting on Todd folios on this page.



Below: government weather map dated Monday 9am 3rd August 1908 from the Todd folio page for 3rd August 1908 on this page.



Below: newspaper version of weather map dated (Monday) 3rd August 1908 from newspaper clipping on Todd folio page for 3rd August 1908 on this page.



Below are the newspaper articles I've processed on Trove.

I have corrected only the snow-relevant text on the Trove electronically generated digital version of this newspaper article below, and I've only included the snow-relevant text from the article. Much of the full article referred to rain falling or fallen and I've not included that text below.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 3 August 1908, page 7
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5168674

RAIN AND SNOW STORMS.
NORTHERN HILLS UNDER SNOW A FOOT DEEP.
SPLENDID FALL OF RAIN.
... . BEAUTIFUL SNOW.
RECORD FALL AT PETERSBURG.
Petersburg, August 2.
An exceptionally heavy fall of snow occurred here on Saturday morning, the amount and duration of the fall exceeding all previous records. Starting at 5 a.m after a week of bitterly cold weather, followed by heavy rain on Friday night, it fell continuously for six hours, and was still falling at midday on Saturday. The water lying about, however, prevented any accumulation on the level ground, though on the roofs of the houses, the wood heaps, grass, shrubs, and the sloping ground it was deep, the hills to the north of the town being covered to a depth of a foot in places. The Gumbowie hills, which looked so charming in the sunlight on the last occasion on which snow fell, were on Saturday invisible owing to the falling flakes and the impossibility of dis-tinguishing them apart from the forefront of white.
Regret was expressed at the fall occurring on Saturday, as it was inopportune, the town having completed arrangements for a gala day. The rifle shooting for a silver cup had to be abandoned owing to the target being invisible and the range being unfit for use. The snow was a pleasing novelty to the Barrier men, who were indulging in the novel occupation of snow-balling, at which the townspeople— familiarity breeding contempt— smiled indulgently until struck by an unusually hard missile. Some of the lads realising the importance of a white Australia seized a colored resident and rubbed snow on his face, unsuccessfully endeavoring to remove the color problem, bringing to mind the Scriptural quotation, "Can the Ethiopian change his skin?" There is every indication of the fall continuing for some time. A heavy fall of rain after a pro-tracted period of dry, frosty weather, which caused the farmers to have misgivings regarding the welfare of their crops, arrived on Friday night, coming down in torrents, and continuing till about 4 o'clock on Saturday morning, when its place was taken by the snow. Altogether 83 points of rain fell during the 24 hours, and the succeeding snow will bring the total up considerably. This opportune fall has relieved the farmers' minds, enough having fallen to keep things going for a month.

SNOW DELAYS TRAIN.
Terowie. August 2.
Good steady rains have fallen, 84 points being registered for the 48 hours ended 9 a.m on Sunday. Snow fell yesterday, the hills around presenting a pretty sight. At Gumbowie siding the fall was heavy, the morning goods train being delayed, and it could not proceed until the line was cleared.
Melrose, August 1.
A heavy fall of snow occurred on Mount Remarkable and the ranges during the night, also a timely rain. Fifty-eight points have been recorded, and it is still raining. It is understood that Booleroo Centre has been favored to the extent of 62 points. This rain will do an immense amount of good, the severe frosts of the last fortnight having checked the crops and feed.
... .
Orroroo.—"Half-inch rain all through north: now snowing."
... .
Mr. John Melrose, Ulooloo. "Forty points rain to 8 o'clock. Snow falling steadily since 9."
... .
Terowie.—"52 points of rain; snowing a good one here."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5168674
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page936334
APA citation
RAIN AND SNOW STORMS. (1908, August 3). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved November 16, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5168674 

****************************************************************

The Chronicle article below was published a week after the above Advertiser article, and included mostly copies of reports from the Advertiser so I've left them out. But there are several from additional locations I've included below. I didn't complete correcting them on Trove so there are still a few errors. Also I've put the place names into upper case to make them easier to find. I've removed most text not relevant to snow.

Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), Saturday 8 August 1908, page 42
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88384498

RAIN AND SNOW STORMS.

PORT PIRIE, August 3. On Saturday morning the residents had the unusual experience of seeing snow lying on the Flinders Range. Passengers by train from Petersburg and Jamestown reported heavy falls up the line, and as late as 3 o'clock in the afternoon snow was brought here on the trains. A splendid soaking rain has been experienced in this district, and farmers in town this morning from Napperby and other hundreds report falls of from three-quarters of an inch to one inch. This has been opportune, and will relieve the anxiety beginning to be felt on account of the effect of the exceptionally heavy frosts and drying winds of the past month.

TARCOWIE, August 3. A heavy fall of snow was experienced not far from here on Saturday last. ... A drive to the hills, about four mlea east, presented a se ies of magnificent pictures. The h ll country was white as far as the sys could reach. The snow at the res dence of Mr. W.H. Thomas was in piaces 18 in. deep. Hundreds of trees were stripped of branches, some measuring 5 and 6 in. thick. Sheep and other stock suf- fered terribly, and the birds were in many instances frozen. Mr. Thomas, a resi-dent in Australia for 60 years, and Mr. John Hortin, another Australian veteran, both agree that it was the heaviest fall of snow they have seen since leav ng Eng-land. In spite of the rain which fell on Saturday evening the snow could be dis-tinctly discerned from here yesterday, and that in sheltered spots will probably re-main for many days. The water derived from the snow is greatly appreciated by . the farmers, and some say that a good season is assured.

MOUNT BRYAN, August 2.—We have experienced another heavy fall of snow. Owing, however, to the large quantity of water lying about the snow soon melted. This is the third fall for the season, and is therefore a record.

HALLETT. August 3 —A heavy fall of snow occurred on Friday evening and Saturday morning. The Mount Bryan range was white. This was the third fall in one winter, and old residents claim this as a record.

DAWSON, August 3.— The weather last week was bitterly cold, and feed and wheat were wanting rain very badly, but on Fri-day night a lovely rain fell, and was fol-lowed by a snowstorm. The snow can still be seen in places. It made a pretty sight on the hills and trees.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88384498
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8507322
APA citation
RAIN AND SNOW STORMS. (1908, August 8). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 42. Retrieved November 18, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88384498 

*********************************************************

The below article has reports of snow from several locations I've already quoted above, and this additional one from Yongala. There are also reports from a number of locations in the north that mentioned rain but not snow. That doesn't necessarily mean snow didn't fall there but I draw this article to the attention of anyone doing detailed research into this very unusual snow event.

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Monday 3 August 1908, page 5
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/60315467

{quoting one item from longer article}

BUSINESS HOUSES ADVICES.
Messrs. James Bell & Co. received the fol-
lowing telegrams on Saturday. From Wal-
laroo— "Splendid general rain last night,
0.50 registered; still raining." Yongala—
"Rain and snow. One inch registered; still
raining.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60315467
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4491655
APA citation
BUSINESS HOUSES ADVICES. (1908, August 3). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved November 25, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60315467 

*********************************************************

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Mon 3 Aug 1908 Page 5
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/60315468

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

ORROROO, August 1.— A good rain set in last night after 10 days of severe frost.
There is a heavy fall of snow.

YONGALA, August 1.— Last night steady rain set in, and the ground has
had a good soaking. Snow fell towards morning, and the surrounding hills are
covered.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60315468
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4491655
APA citation
COUNTRY REPORTS. (1908, August 3). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved March 3, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60315468 

*****************************************************************

This text below looks to be closely based on one or more weather bureau reports, but it doesn't name the sources. Re "Snow was reported to be general in the north and was still continuing over parts of the eastern counties and the upper northern agricultural areas" it's a rather sweeping statement and I wonder how accurate a generalisation it was.

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 3 August 1908, page 6
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5168436

{quoting weather-relevant part of a longer article}

RAIN AND SNOW.
The monsoonal influence which has been a marked feature of the weather chart for the past two or three days has increased in energy over the centre of the continent and is moving southward towards the settled areas of this State. Under its influence very cold weather has been experienced, with gusty east to south-east winds. Friday night was especially boisterous and on Saturday morning the weather map showed that a splendid general rain had fallen over all the country from Alice Springs to Lake Eyre, and from those localities to the north-east pastoral country. It was also shown that useful rains had fallen over the dry north-eastern pastoral country, including Broken Hill, as well as over the north-western and western districts and the areas as far south as the Burra. The following stations had over an inch of rain up to Saturday morning:—Koolunga, 1.26 in.; Snowtown, 1.39 in.; Redhill, 1.08 in.; Gulnare, 1.25 in. The falls between the Burra and the centre of the continent were mostly above one-third of an inch. Snow was reported to be general in the north and was still continuing over parts of the eastern counties and the upper northern agricultural areas.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5168436
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page936333
APA citation
TOPICS OF THE DAY. (1908, August 3). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5168436 

End of my report "1st August: Rare Mid-North and Flinders Ranges "Monsoon Low" snowfall."

*********************************************************

13-14th September 1908: some widely scattered snow showers.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 5

There were some scattered reports of snow falling on Sunday 13th and Monday 14th September 1908, from Fleurieu Peninsula, the Mount Lofty Ranges and the Mid-North. The snow appears to have fallen (predominantly at least) as showers along with some rain and hail rather than as more lengthy periods of precipitation. The reports were not confined to high peaks eg there were reports from Burra and Watervale in the Mid-North, and Meadows South (now Meadows) and Mt Compass on Fleureau Peninsula.

September 1908 calendar. Source: timeanddate.com.

To see the Todd folios for the relevant days visit the index page http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/indexpage/1908.html  and go from there.

The images below are screengrabs from maps on the Todd folio for 12th. The first is an original government map with the time and date (top of image - a bit right of centre) of 9am Saturday 12th September 1908. The second is a map in a newspaper clearly based on the official map, and with the date 12-8-08 on it.





Looking at the above weather map suggests to me the snow and hail fell from a vigorous airstream coming from the Southern Ocean, between a low centred near Tasmania and a high centred near Perth on 12th.

Here are the newspaper articles I found on Trove with snow-relevant text. My search was not exhaustive and maybe a more detailed search would uncover more reports than those I've posted below.

Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), Saturday 19 September 1908, page 8
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88304744

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

THE SEASON AND THE FARM.

MEADOWS SOUTH, September 14.— Last night rain, hail, and snow fell, and early this morning the ground was white. Several light falls of snow occurred this morning.

MOUNT COMPASS, September 14— Rain set in on Saturday, and has continued since with occasional showers of hail. This will be a great benefit to the crops after last week's exceptionally warm sun hine. Thick flakes of snow fell this morning, the temperature being as low as 44 deg. in the houses.

SELLICK'S HILL. September 14.—The weather has been bitterly cold for the past three days. Snow fell in the hills this morning and last night. Splendid rains have fallen since Friday, which will greatly benefit the late crops and feed.

MOUNT TORRENS, September 14.— Late on Saturday afternoon a sudden squall of wind and rain came up from the west, and during Sunday heavy showers of hail and rain fell, often mixed with snow. Old residents cannot remember such wintry conditions in September. Bark-stripping has begun, but is hindered by the severe weather. Crops, although late, are look-ing well.

BURRA, September 13.— After a few days of warm weather sufficient snow fell this morning to make the hills white. It was followed by a sleety rain. This is the latest time in-any season that snow can be remembered here.

EDEN VALLEY, September 13.— A week of delightful weather has made a wonderful improvement to crops and herb-age. Hail, rain, and snow fell to-day.

LOBETHAL, September 14.— A week's pleasant weather has stimulated the growth of grass and crops. On Satur-day heavy rain and hail fell. There was a light fall of snow on Sunday.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88304744
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8507654
APA citation
THE SEASON AND THE FARM. (1908, September 19). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved November 19, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88304744 

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Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), Saturday 19 September 1908, page 13
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88304965/8507659

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

MOUNT BRYAN, September 14.—On Sunday morning snow again fell, and soon made a big show. ... —The weather is very cold. Another fall of snow, the fourth this season, occurred yesterday, accompanied by hail. This morning snow was to be seen on the Mount Bryan Ranges.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88304965
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8507659
APA citation
THE HARROW FLOOD. (1908, September 19). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 13. Retrieved November 20, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88304965 

****************************************************

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Tuesday 15 September 1908,
page 5
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/58929001

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

MOUNT COMPASS, September 14. Rain set in on Saturday, and has
continued since with heavy showers of hail. Snow fell this
morning at about half-past 8. The flakes were large, and the
temperature was as low as 44 degrees inside. This was 2 deg.
lower than in the middle of winter.

WATERVALE, September 14— The warm weather of last week has given
place to boisterous cold conditions. The rain has not been heavy,
but was welcome none the less. Yesterday there was a slight fall
of snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58929001
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4490865
APA citation
EMU DRIVE. (1908, September 15). The Register (Adelaide, SA :
1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved November 18, 2016, from
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58929001 

*************************************************

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 16 September 1908, page 8
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5183566

PICCADILLY, September 14.— ... Early on Sunday morning there
was a light fall of snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5183566
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page936867
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1908, September 16). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved November 19, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5183566 

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Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Wednesday 16 September 1908, page 8
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/58933524

STIRLING EAST, September 14.—The sunny weather of last week was effectively dispelled by severe hailstorms early on Sunday morning. Just after daybreak there was a slight fall of snow, and again on Monday for a few minutes the feathery flakes came fluttering earthward, showing that winter's grip of the hills is being rather reluctantly yielded up.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58933524
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4490880
APA citation
RABBIT AS FOOD. (1908, September 16). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 8. Retrieved November 19, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58933524 

*****************************************************************

This item presumably refers to snow falling at Naracoorte (named Narracoorte in those days). Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), Tuesday 15 September 1908, page 2
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/147047030

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15. 1908.
Wintry Weather.—After a muggy, disagreeable day on Friday a thunderstorm passed over the district late at night accompanied by showers of rain. On Saturday the weather was clearer, but showers fell at times during the day and night. Sunday was a cold and boisterous day. The wind blew heavy from the south-west, and there were frequent showers of rain and hail. Monday was even more wintry than Sunday, and was bitterly cold as well. Two falls of snow were reported, one shortly after six o'clock in the morning and another about 9 o'clock. They were light falls, but the flakes were quite visible.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147047030
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17470417
APA citation
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1908. (1908, September 15). The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 17, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147047030 

End of my report on "13-14th September 1908: some widely scattered snow showers."

************************************************************

Sat-Sun 19-20th September 1908: another big snowfall.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 7

September 1908 calendar. Source: timeanddate.com.

Looking at the weather maps I've copied below, and reading various reports and comments from the newspapers, this looks like a typical vigorous deep below-zero airstream coming up over southern South Australia from deep in the Southern Ocean, being driven northwards by a low near Tasmania and a high pressure system to the west.

We don't have the benefit of the modern upper level charts and satellite image loops to provide any further details, so we're unable to see how far the low extends southwards and whether the high ridges southwards or south-south-eastwards, nor how quickly the airstream was moving northwards. Other features the early charts don't show are cold fronts, and secondary lows and little fronts and troughs embedded in the cold airflow on the western side of the low.

Regarding the dates of this fall, there was one report of snow falling on Friday 18th: "Snow was reported to have fallen on Friday and Saturday inland from Cape De Couedic." Reports of snow on Kangaroo Island are extremely rare.

Below: map showing location of Cape Du Couedic on the south-western tip of Kangaroo Island. Source Bonzle.com



Below: this is a weather map in a newspaper clipping on the Todd folios website page for Saturday 19th September. The map has the date 19.9.08 on it which presumably means it's based on the official government weather map issued at 9am Saturday 19th. Source: this Todd folio page. The government 9am Saturday weather map is also on that page.



Below: It seems that following the custom of the time there was no government weather map issued on Sunday morning 20th September. So we skip Sunday and go to a weather map in a newspaper clipping on the Todd folios website page for Monday 21st September. Source: this Todd folio page. The government 9am Monday weather map is also on that page.



Below: a report from Petersburg in the Mid-North (now named Peterborough) dated September 21st.



For anyone wishing to explore this snowfall further there are a variety of relevant newspaper clippings with information and observations from South Australia and other states, on the Todd folio pages for the days centred on 19th to 21st September. Links to the pages can be found on this index page.

Below are the newspaper articles (or snow-relevant parts) with reports on this event I've corrected on Trove. This is not an exhaustive collection - there are other uncorrected articles in the newspapers of the day which refer to this event.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 15 September 1908 Page 6 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/58929048

SNOW IN SEPTEMBER.

When seen on Monday Mr. G. F. Dodwell said:— "The disturbance which covered this State and south-eastern Australia on Saturday has now passed away to the eastward, and its centre is this morning near the Bluff, south island of New Zealand. Very wintry weather was experienced in its passage, and snow is being recorded from many places in South Australia, Victoria, and Tasmania. On Sunday snow fell in some of our northern areas, on the Mount Lofty Ranges, and in the south-east, which is very exceptional for September. Very cold and squally south-westerly winds blew on Saturday evening and throughout Sunday, and during the 48 hours ended 8.30 this morning a light to moderate rain was registered in the agricultural areas, in the ranges, and the south-east. The maximum falls were three-quarters of an inch in parts of the Mount Lofty Ranges and in the south-east. At 8.30 this morning it was still cold and showery over our southern areas, with hail falling over the Mount Lofty Ranges and in the south-east, and snow at various places in the highlands, with squally winds and rough seas on our south coast. Snow-storms are also reported in Tasmania and southern Victoria, with light to heavy general rain, which also extended into New South Wales and south-east Queensland. A high-pressure system now covers Australia, with its centre at the head of the Bight. In the west the weather is fine and mostly clear, with northerly winds. The forecast for South Australia of the Acting Commonwealth Meteorologist is: — 'Frosty night to north, cloudy to showery in south and south-east, with southerly winds, followed by fine and milder weather, with winds veering east and north.' "

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58929048
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4490866
APA citation
SNOW IN SEPTEMBER. (1908, September 15). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 6. Retrieved July 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58929048

***********************************************************

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 22 September 1908, page 7
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5185672

{quoting mostly snow-relevant text from a longer article}

FOREST RANGE, September 21. — ... . During the early hours of Sunday morning there was a fall of snow, and at 7 a.m. the ground was covered with the white mantle, the shrubs and flowers all drooping with their load. There were light falls of snow throughout the day.

BURRA, September 20.—A good fall of snow occurred during the night, and this morning the hills all around here were well clad with it. The snow was still visible towards evening.

MINTARO, September 21.—The weather during the past three or four days has been remarkably cold, with driving showers of rain and hail. On Sunday morning there was a fall of snow for a quarter of an hour, but the snow melted away as soon as it touched the ground.

SPALDING, September 21.—Some very heavy hail showers were experienced on Saturday and Sunday. The gauge registered 132 points in the two days. The River Broughton is running a banker and is impassable. Snow is to be seen all along the Canowie and Booboorowie ranges.

Jamestown, September 21.—"Ninety-eight points; nice steady rain since Saturday morning; light fall snow that night."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5185672
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page936937
APA citation
ROUGH WEATHER. (1908, September 22). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved November 24, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5185672 

*********************************************************

Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 23 September 1908, page 8
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5185836

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

LOBETHAL, September 21. — The weather on Saturday and Sunday was the worst experienced here this year. Strong winds, with hail, did much damage to the blossom of early plums. On Sunday there were heavy falls of snow. ... .

MOUNT BRYAN, September 30.—A heavy hailstorm swept over the district yes-terday. In the night snow began to fall and continued to a depth of several inches. In sheltered places it was 12 in. deep. This is the sixth tall for the season.

MOUNT BRYAN EAST, September 21.— Snow fell from Saturday to Sunday after-noon, and remained all day on the ground. It was several feet deep in the Mount Bryan ranges.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5185836
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page936951
APA citation
THE PRODUCER (1908, September 23). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved November 23, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5185836 

*******************************************************

The article below includes a rare report of snow falling on Kangaroo Island:
"KINGSCOTE (K.I.), September 21.—The weather has been extremely rough for the last fortnight, cold showers from the north-west and the south-west, with occasional hailstorms. Snow was reported to have fallen on Friday and Saturday inland from Cape De Couedic. About an inch of rain has been registered."

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Wednesday 23 September 1908, page 5
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/58937169

{quoting only snow-relevant text and some other weather-relevant text from longer article}

APPILA-YARROWIE, September 21.— We had all kinds of weather here on Sunday— thunder, rain, hail, and heavy falls of snow. The ground was white for some time. Many people indulged in snowballing.— The crops are looking splendid. The last rains will keep the ground moist. Shearing will be later owing to the unusually cold and frosty weather.

BENDLEBY, September 21.— Squally weather set in on Saturday afternoon, and brought heavy falls of rain and snow. Similar conditions continued yesterday. For the time of the year it is cold, but the rain will do a great deal of good. Feed is plentiful and wheat crops are looking well.

BLINMAN, September 21.— The rainfall for the past few weeks has been much above the average, and the prospects for the pastoralists are splendid. ... — An uncommon phenomena occurred on Saturday. Rain had been falling all the morning, yet about 2.30 p.m. a duststorm rose from Parachilna Plain, 20 miles away, passed over here, and made the place dark. Then a hail storm began, and the hail was quite dirty from falling through the dust above. A hailstorm and duststorm above a ground already saturated with many hours' previous rain must be a rare occurrence. The hail proved the victor, and in a few minutes cleared the atmosphere from dust. The rain continued until late on Sunday afternoon.

DAVEYSTON, September 22.— We have rung all the changes on the weather lately, for we have had heavy rain, hail, snow, high winds, and lastly, and least of it all, some lovely sunshine.

HAWKER. September 21.— Delightful showers, with hail and a little snow, fell on Saturday and Sunday, yesterday being one of the coldest days that we have ex-perienced this season. The rain was general throughout the district, and will do a great amount of good to the crops.

KINGSCOTE (K.I.), September 21.—The weather has been extremely rough for the last fortnight, cold showers from the north-west and the south-west, with occasional hailstorms. Snow was reported to have fallen on Friday and Saturday inland from Cape De Couedic. About an inch of rain has been registered.

LANGHORNE'S CREEK, September 21. —Splendid rains have fallen. ... Mr. Frank Potts, of Bleasdale Vineyards is planting a large area with vines to make up for the loss of vineyard caused by the fire on Christmas Day. In some parts the land was heavily timbered with redgum, and necessitated much labour in clearing. On Sunday morning one of the heaviest hail-storms known at the creek fell for several minutes. The ground had all the appearances of a snowstorm, and in sheltered places the hail could be seen quite three hours afterwards.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58937169
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4490947
APA citation
RURAL INDUSTRIES. (1908, September 23). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved November 23, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58937169 

*******************************************************

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 21 September 1908 Page 8 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/58931797

THE COUNTRY.
SNOW IN THE HILLS.

STIRLING, September 20.—On two successive Sunday mornings snow has fallen here, surely a rare experience in the latter half of September. On each occasion severe hailstorms preceded the fall. At a house in Stirling where alterations are being carried out the kitchen table was temporarily placed outside. This morning, just before 7 o'clock, a little girl came in to her parents with a tastefully heaped-up dish of newly fallen snow gathered trom it, and seldom probably has a dish so dainty and unique been prepared on a South Australian kitchen table as that. Work-weary residents of matured years mostly preferred admiring the steady descent of the silvery flakes through lifted blinds from the snug shelter of a well blanketed bed, and were grateful for the Sabbath law of repose which enabled them to enjoy its cosy seclusion a little longer than usual. For a time the ground was whitened, but the sun came out and the crystal visitants from overhead speedily dissolved.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58931797
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4490930
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1908, September 21). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 8. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58931797

************************************************************************************** Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), Friday 25 September 1908, page 6
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/132366514

—Rain, Hail, and Snow.—
Saturday and Sunday last proved to be considerable out of the ordinary for weather, as on both days there were experienced storms of hail, rain, and snow. This is unique at the end of September, and it is to be hoped that good will come out of it all.

Article identifier http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132366514

Page identifier http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10568143

APA citation Burra Burra (1908, September 25). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 6. Retrieved November 15, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132366514

*****************************************************************

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 21 September 1908 Page 7 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/5185358

COLD WEATHER.
RAIN AND HAIL.
SNOW IN THE COUNTRY.

An extraordinary change in the weather took place towards the end of last week, and on Saturday and Sunday residents of the city had recourse to heavy top-coats and umbrellas. Saturday was so rough and cold that the warmest of winter clothing was not wholly proof against it, and thousands of people who ventured out of doors spent several unpleasant hours. The driving rain squalls were as severe as anything experienced all through the winter, and the frequent hailstorms were certainly something to be remembered for many a day. The forecast issued at 11 a.m. on Saturday, namely "Squally and showery, with north-west and south-west winds; gales on coast," was fulfilled to the letter on Saturday afternoon, and it is to be hoped that the concluding sentences of the forecast—"Finer by Monday"—will also prove correct. Mr. G. F. Dodwell on Saturday said that the weather map showed storm conditions over South Australia and the eastern States, with the centre of a large disturbance over the west coast of Tasmania, where the barometer reading was 29.56. There were steep barometric gradients to the westward under the influence of a rapidly-advancing high-pressure system, the reading at the Leeuwin being 30.51. On Saturday morning the weather generally was gloomy over South Australia, and showery over the agricultural areas south of Laura. No official reports were received at the Weather Office on Sunday, but information from correspondents of "The Advertiser" shows that the Antarctic disturbance was very general in character.

SNOWBALLING AT TRURO.
Truro, September 19.—Heavy showers of rain fell all day, with hail and sleet and snow at intervals. Snowballing look place in the streets. The boisterous and cold weather is remarkable for September. The creeks are all running strongly.

SNOW ON MOUNT REMARKABLE.
Melrose, September 20.—After the bitter cold of Saturday morning it began to rain at midday and kept on continuously until 1 o'clock to-day. Rough, boisterous weather prevailed most of the time, with occasional heavy hailstorms. By 4 p.m. on Saturday Mount Remarkable was snow-capped. The whole of the range presented a beautiful sight to-day in its snowy mantle, the snow being a foot deep in places. The rain gauge measured 1.60 in. up to 11 a.m. to-day. It is now clearing.

WILMINGTON, September 20.—There has been a splendid rain of 1.09 in. up to 9 p.m.

MOUNT GAMBIER, September 20.— Since Friday night the weather has been very wintry and the cold intense, with frequent showers of hail.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5185358
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page936923
APA citation
COLD WEATHER. (1908, September 21). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved July 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5185358

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 22 September 1908 Page 5 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/58932915

SNOW.

YARCOWIE, September 19.— Snow began to fall on Saturday and continued till midday on Sunday. The snowclad hills present a fine appearance.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58932915
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4490937
APA citation
SNOW. (1908, September 22). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved July 14, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58932915

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 21 September 1908 Page 4 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/58931800

RAIN, HAIL, AND SNOW.
The section of the article relating directly to snow reads:

Our Petersburg correspondent wired on Sunday evening: — ''Petersburg and district have had a further fall of rain and snow. Rain commenced about midday yesterday and continued all the afternoon, accompanied with hail and snow. On several occasions rain, hail, and snow were falling at the same time. About 9 o'clock last night snow began, and continued without intermission till about 10 o'clock this morning. The ground was covered with a white mantle, which in some places was 6 in. deep. This fall is the heaviest yet seen in the district. Rain has fallen at interval during the day. There is every prospect of more. This rain on the top of that of a fortnight ago will do a vast amount of good, and an excellent season is practically assured."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58931800
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4490926
APA citation
RAIN, HAIL. AND SNOW. (1908, September 21). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 4. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58931800

End of my report on "13-14th September 1908: some hail and snow reported".

************************************************************

Reports of other snowfalls in 908.

Friday 5th June 1908: Mount Lofty Ranges.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 1

I found one report of snow falling on Mount Lofty on 5th June 1908. It appears from the documentation below that the snow fell from a very cold airstream coming up from the Southern Ocean between a low east of Tasmania and a high centred around the southern coast of Western Australia.

Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Friday 5 June 1908, page 1

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/208822826

{quoting entire article}

SNOW ON MOUNT LOFTY.
It was snowing at Mount Lofty between 11 and 12 o'clock this morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208822826
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22917164
APA citation
SNOW ON MOUNT LOFTY. (1908, June 5). The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), p. 1 (4 o'clock). Retrieved November 15, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208822826 

***************************************************

This report below doesn't mention snow in South Australia but does provide useful meteorological information of the weather on the day of the above 5th June Mt Lofty snow report.

Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Friday 5 June 1908, page 4
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/208822907

METEOROLOGIST'S REPORT.
The Observatory, Friday.
A useful rain has fallen during the past 24 hours over the agricultural areas of South Australia; on the Mount Lofty Ranges some very heavy showers with hail were ex-perienced. Rain has also fallen over the Riverina and southern districts of New South Wales, and practically over the whole of Victoria and Tasmania, and it is very stormy this morning along our south-east coast, through the Straits, and around Tasmania. The depression noted yesterday over Tasmania is shown by this morning's chart between New Zealand and the island State. Over South Australia. New South Wales, and Western Australia high barometers are reported under the influence of a large anti-cyclone. Very cold weather has prevailed over this State and the eastern States and Tasmania, with snow in parts of New South Wales and Victoria.
APA citation
METEOROLOGIST'S REPORT. (1908, June 5). The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), p. 4 (4 o'clock). Retrieved November 15, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208822907 

**********************************



Above: Todd folios weather map dated 9am Friday 5th June. Source: Todd folios page for Friday 5th June

End of my report on "Friday 5th June 1908: Mount Lofty Ranges."

**********************************************************

Friday 12th June 1908: one report from near Petersburg.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 1

I found one report of snow falling near Petersburg (now Peterborough) on Friday 12th June 1908.
"PETERSBURG, June 15.—The weather during the past week was bitterly cold, and rain fell almost unceasingly. ... Snow is reported to have fallen a short distance from the town on Friday morning."
June 15th was a Monday so the previous Friday was the 12th.

Below are details of the newspaper article on trove where I found the report, and then a screengrab of a newspaper version of the weather map for (9am presumably) Saturday 12th June from the Todd folio for 12th June 1908. Judging by the weather map and from reading notes on the weather of that day on newspaper clippings on the Todd folio site, there was an unstable south-westerly airstream prevailing on the day, which is a typical winter-spring scenario for reports of snowshowers in southern South Australia.

Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), Saturday 20 June 1908, page 9
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88387892

THE SEASON AND THE FARM.
{quoting snow-relevant part of a longer article}

PETERSBURG, June 15.—The weather during the past week was bitterly cold, and rain fell almost unceasingly. ... Snow is reported to have fallen a short distance from the town on Friday morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88387892
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8506869
APA citation
THE SEASON AND THE FARM. (1908, June 20). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved November 15, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88387892 

************************************************************

Below: a newspaper weather map for 12th June on the Todd folio for 12th June 1908, on this webpage.



The government weather map and newspaper cuttings are on Todd folio page for 12th June at this address.

End of my report on "Friday 12th June 1908: one report from near Petersburg."

******************************************************

Saturday 18th July: fall of snow reported from Hallett in Mid-North

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 1

Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), Friday 31 July 1908, page 6
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/132365628

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

HALLETT.
July 21. [the Saturday before July 21st is 18th - Miles]
—More Snow.—
Another fall of snow occurred here on Saturday evening, and as the hills were just beginning to get white a light rain set in and melted it. It has been remarkably cold since, and residents say the frosts have been a record for Hallett.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132365628
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10568071
APA citation
HALLETT. (1908, July 31). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132365628 

End of my report on "Saturday 18th July: fall of snow reported from Hallett in Mid-North."

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Saturday 25th July 1908 at Hallett and Mount Bryan (Mid-North) and Mount Brown (southern Flinders Ranges).

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 2

I found three records of falling snow on Saturday 25th July 1908, at Hallett and at Mount Bryan in the Mid-North, and at Mt Brown in the southern Flinders Ranges. It's not clear from the Mount Bryan report whether snow fell on Mount Bryan the town or Mount Bryan the mountain: "MOUNT BRYAN, July 28.—Saturday was intensely cold. Snow fell on Mount Bryan for about two hours."

Now, judging by the government weather map dated 9am Saturday 25th July (the day of the reported fall) and a newspaper clipping, both on the Todd folios page for the 25th, there is no sign of a very cold deep south-westerly or southerly airstream from the far Southern Ocean. The Commonwealth Meteorologist refers in a newspaper clipping (see below) to a slight monsoonal low pressure extension, extensive cloud development, and "a little light rain as far as the northern district of South Australia".

This appears to be a rare example of snow falling in South Australia from an air-mass that hasn't come up from the deep Southern Ocean. Here's the relevant text in a screengrab from the newspaper clipping.

Below: part of (?Herald) newspaper clipping on Todd folios page for 25th July 1908 on this page.



Below: official government weather map dated 9am Saturday 25th July 1908 from Todd folios on this page.



Below: Herald newspaper weather map dated 9am Saturday 25th July 1908 on this page.



Below are the newspaper records of these snowfalls I found on Trove.

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Tuesday 28 July 1908, page 3
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/60311105

HALLETT. July 25—At about 7 o'clock
this morning snow began to fall, and con-
tinued for about an hour. The flakes were
small, and melted as they came in contact
with the ground. It started again about
10.30, but fell for only a few minutes.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60311105
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4491595
APA citation
NEW MASONIC HALL. (1908, July 28). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 3. Retrieved November 17, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60311105 

*****

Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), Saturday 1 August 1908, page 17
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/164112820

The Saturday referred to in this article is July 25th.

{quoting entire article}

SNOW At MOUNT BRYAN.
MOUNT BRYAN, July 28.—Saturday was intensely cold. Snow fell on Mount Bryan for about two hours. Severe frosts have fallen in succession.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164112820
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19102559
APA citation
SNOW At MOUNT BRYAN. (1908, August 1). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 17. Retrieved November 25, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164112820 

*****

Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Tuesday 28 July 1908, page 8
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/60311264

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

[Note on dates: Tuesday 28th, Monday 27th so "Last Friday" was 24th and "Saturday morning" was 25th - Miles]

WILMINGTON, July 27.— A long continuance of extremely cold weather, with frosty nights, is not conducive to rapid vegetable growth. This condition has prevailed throughout the last month or so, ... . Last Friday was a bitterly cold night, and on Saturday morning the sides of Mount Brown were white with snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60311264
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4491600
APA citation
SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SHEEP FOR QUEENSLAND. (1908, July 28). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 8. Retrieved February 28, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60311264 

End of my report on "Saturday 25th July 1908 at Hallett and Mount Bryan."

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End of my report on snowfalls in 1908.

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