1905: August 29th blockbuster snow event and other 1905 falls.

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August 29th 1905 blockbuster snow event. Contender for biggest SA fall.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 10

On 29th August 1905 there were very extensive snowfalls over the high country, from the Mount Lofty Ranges to the Flinders Ranges. My impression from reading newspaper articles of the time is that this was one of the five biggest snow events in South Australia's recorded history, and it follows rather closely on another of our biggest snow events, on 27th and 28th July 1901. Three likely contenders for biggest South Australian snowfall in our recorded history are 27-28th July 1901, 29th August 1905, and July 19-20th 1951.

On the National Library of Australia's Trove website I've corrected many electronically scanned newspaper articles on the 29th August 1905 snowfall and copied them below.

Another source of information relating to this snow event is on the Charles Todd Weather Folios website. To find the relevant pages click on this link and then click on dates on and around the date August 29. To go straight to the August 29th folio click on this link

Items on their pages include images of newspaper clippings, weather maps and weather reports. Under the heading "THE METEOROLOGIST'S REPORT The Observatory, August 29" it says in part: "Snow ... fell over all the high-level country between the Mount Lofty Ranges and Orroroo".

Now to the many newspaper articles I've corrected on Trove and copied below. Although there was no internet and no mobile phones, there were many newspapers publishing in the early part of the 20th century and together they published reports on the snowfall from correspondents in numerous towns around the countryside. And being on printed newspaper their reports have survived unscathed over the intervening one hundred and ten or so years.

The Register article:

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 31 August 1905 Page 3.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824751

Below I quote the entire article.

RAIN AND SNOW.

ALDINGA. August 29.—To-day has been the coldest this winter. Snow has fallen all around the district, and the hilltops in the distance showed up quite white.
AMYTON, August 29.—A smart shower of hailstones this afternoon, about 3 o'clock, was followed by a fall of snow, which was heavier on the hills than on the plain.
BAROOTA. August 30.—A fall of an inch of rain is reported. Dams are full. Snow fell on the west side of the Flinders Range.
CARRIETON, August 30.—The Horseshoe Hills, to the north-west of the town, presented a fine sight this morning, as they were covered with snow which had fallen during the night. A little fell yesterday.
CORROMANDEL VALLEY, August 29.—The first snowfall of importance was witnessed to-day. It lasted over half an hour. The hills were covered with snow several inches thick, and presented a most beautiful sight. The school children were delighted, as some of them had never seen snow before.
DAWSON. August 29.—The weather today was exceptionally cold, with drizzling showers, accompanied by a light fall of snow. It was quite a novelty to see the ground white, and children indulging in the rare sport of throwing snowballs.
EUDUNDA, August 29.—A correspondent writes:— "Never before in the annals of Eudunda since I left old England (26 years ago) has such a grand sight been witnessed. It was really beyond the dreams of imagination to see the grand, picturesque appear- ance of the large mountainous hills which surround the beautiful little town of Eudunda covered with snow. It was indeed a novelty to both old and young, playing at the grand old game— snowball. It took me back to boyhood days. This wonderful weather has come in the nick of time to save what would have been an utter failure to several of the crops around here."
EUDUNDA, August 29.—A rare sight was witnessed here this morning, as during the early hours snow had fallen, and the residents saw the hills in the distance and buildings, ground, and vegetation near at hand covered with snow, which was visible until midday. Before the early morn's fall had quite disappeared there was, about 12.30 p.m., another fall, and the amateur photographers, as well as the boys, were strongly in evidence. A sight never to be forgotten was witnessed in snowballing by young and old, and in different places were to be seen the figures of snow men. The cold weather before and after the snow-storm will long be remembered.
GEORGETOWN, August 29.—On Tuesday morning the country as far as the eye could see was covered with snow. The woodheaps, trees, and houses represented an old English scene. The Bundaleer Hills presented a beautiful sight. The peaks were covered. In the gullies the snow was 3 to 4 ft. deep, and on the slopes 2 ft. deep. The snow fell heavily at 7 o'clock a.m., and another heavy fall which began at 9 a.m. lasted about half an hour. At 4 o'clock this afternoon was the heaviest of all. During the early part of the morning snowballing was indulged in. An idea of the extent of the fall may be gathered from the fact that the weighbridge, which was balanced on Monday, at 10 o'clock this morning had 1½ cwt. of snow on it. This is the first snow that has fallen in this town, although the ranges have twice been covered.
HAMILTON. August 29.—This morning when residents awoke it was seen that there had been a snowstorm during the night. The hills were covered, and all today we have had heavy hail and snow — quite an unusual event.
HALLETT, August 29.—Yesterday was cold, and snow started to fall at daylight this morning. It continued with slight intermission throughout the day, and the country was covered with a white mantle for miles around.
JAMESTOWN, August 30.—The Bundaleer Ranges are still covered with snow. With the sun shining on them this morning it was a splendid sight. The highest of the hills are perfectly white, in others one sees the streaks of green timber showing along the snow-clad portions, which gives a pretty effect.
KAPUNDA, August 30.—Yesterday was a record for cold. In the early morning the train from Eudunda was a sight, as the roofs of the carriages carried a mantle of snow. During the day the novel sight was witnessed of flakes falling. These, however, dissolved immediately on contact with the ground. Mr. Wanke brought in a large snowball from Anlaby.
LINWOOD, August 30—A good rain, accompanied by hail and snow, fell on Monday night and all Tuesday.
MAITLAND, August 29.—At 7.30 this morning a heavy fall of hail for about five minutes left the ground literally covered, and the streets looked as if there had been a snowstorm. At 11 o'clock the thermometer fell to freezing point, and a few minutes later there was another shower of hail, accompanied by a light fall of snow, a sight never before witnessed in this township. Rain and snow continued to fall at intervals during the day.
MELROSE, August 29—To-day has been exceptionally cold for so late in August. About noon sleet fell, followed by a fine fall of snow. At 2 o'clock the weather cleared slightly for a while, and Mount Remarkable and the higher of the surrounding hills presented a pretty appearance, covered with a white mantle, against which the larger trees stood out in bold relief. A lot of snow also fell some miles to the east, but although some of the flakes were particularly large they melted upon reaching the ground. Higher on the Mount, however, snow was still visible in large quantities late in the afternoon. McLAREN VALE, August 29.—Great excitement prevailed this morning when snow was seen to fall on the surrounding hills. It even reached as far as McLaren Flat. The school children were dismissed for a short time to witness the snow. It was, indeed, a pretty sight, and even the old English folk enjoyed it as much as the Valeites, for it reminded them of bygone scenes.
NORMANVILLE, August 30.—Stormy weather has prevailed during the past few days, with fierce squalls and hailstorms. Snow is reported to have fallen at Sellick's Hill, Carracalinga, Wattle Flat, and Glenburn.
PEKINA August 29—Early this morning snow fell. There were a few light falls of snow during the morning, but shortly after midday it came down in style. The country was soon covered in a mantle of white, the fall lasting for nearly half an hour. Shortly after it ceased the sun shone out for a brief interval, and the sight presented by the snowclad ranges was beautiful indeed. Snowballing was freely indulged in.
ROBERTSTOWN, August 30.—Splendid rains fell throughout yesterday, accompanied by snow and hail. The snow fell throughout the day, and was a grand sight. The tops of the hills were covered with the frozen mass. These rains will do a vast amount of good. SUTHERLANDS, August 29.—During the night there was a fall of snow and hail on the hills a few miles west of the town ship. This morning the hills were quite white, and were covered in places with several inches of snow and hail. Engineman Edmunds, who came from Eudunda this morning, brought with him a large block of congealed snow and hail, and left it at the railway station. Many of the residents inspected it. This is the heaviest fall of snow and hail in this locality for many years. August 30.— Yesterday will be long remembered by residents as one of the coldest and stormiest on record. During the morning and afternoon there were some heavy falls of rain, hail, snow, and sleet. The hills to the west were covered with snow the whole day, and this morning there are still some patches to be seen. A few years ago when we had a snowfall the snow all disappeared in a short time. The moisture will be welcome to the farmers; several of the crops were looking sickly for want of moisture. Mr. Owen Ford, who has taken careful observations for many years, never remembers the mercury so low as was indicated by his thermometer yesterday.
TARCOWIE. August 29,—Snow could be seen on the ranges yesterday morning. There were eight or ten heavy falls of snow during the day.
WILLOWIE, August 30.—Yesterday showers were mingled with snow, and Coomooroo Hill was coated with white. This morning Flinders Range is capped with snow, and presents a pretty sight.
WILLUNGA, August 29.—To-day residents were treated to one of the most beautiful sights that have been seen here. The hills were covered with snow, which commenced to fall at about 10.30 a.m., and lasted for about half an hour. It was a day to be remembered, as we had all classes of weather— rain, hail, sleet, snow, and sunshine, also thunder and lightning during the day.
WIRRABARA. August 29.—Exceedingly stormy weather was experienced last night and to-day. Hailstorms were continuous, and, to the great delight of those who had never seen the pure white element, snow began to fall steadily about noon, and continued for 20 minutes. At about 5 p.m. another fall occurred in the hills, and left the ranges white and dazzling in the watery gleams of the setting sun, which emerged from the clouds at that hour for the first time in the day. Farmers were undeniably becoming anxious at the dry spell, but anxiety is again lulled for a time. Reports have come in from the Port Germein side of the range that the recent dry winds and severe frosts have played havoc with crops near Baroota.

{end of quote of entire article}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824751
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421553
APA citation
RAIN AND SNOW. (1905, August 31). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 3. Retrieved December 6, 2013, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824751

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Below is a photo in the State Library of South Australia, with the caption "Snow Fall, Mount Lofty, Lady Milne's House, Aug. 29th, 1905."

Mt Lofty August 29th 1905.

Above photo: "Snow Fall, Mount Lofty, Lady Milne's House, Aug. 29th, 1905."
Source: State Library of South Australia.
Photo B 33591
Permanent SLSA link: Permanent link B 33591

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Crafers August 29th 1905.

Above photo: Snowing at Crafers August 29th 1905.
Source: State Library of South Australia.
Photo B 24335
Permanent link: Permanent link B 24335

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Mount Lofty 1905.

Above photo: The information accompanying the photo on the SLSA website indicates this is a snow scene Mt Lofty 1905, so it's very likely to be 29th August as I could find no records of any other falls of comparable magnitude in that year.
Source: State Library of South Australia.
Photo B-37101
Permanent SLSA link: Permanent link B 24335

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1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (continued).

Below is another and much longer article I found and corrected on Trove, devoted entirely to reports sent in from many towns where it snowed (and from a train passenger), from Meadows South in the south to Orroroo in the north.

Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931) Saturday 2 September 1905 Page 44.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/162438735

{quoting entire article}

SNOWBALLS AT A DANCE.

ROBERTSTOWN, August 29.—This morning the hills to the west and north present quite a picturesque sight. They are heavily covered with snow. A slight fall occurred in the township at 7.30 last night. At a dance held at Point Pass last night the people had the novelty of snow- balls in the dance room.

AUBURN, August 29.—To-day has been intensely cold. Between 9 and 10 o'clock there were several light falls of snow, which, however, melted as soon as the ground was reached. The fall was heavier in the hills, about four miles to the north. These were covered, and when the clouds lifted for a short time and the sun shone the scene was one of rare beauty. Heavy hailstorms have passed over at intervals.

ANGASTON, August 29.—The weather here has been extremely wintry during the past 24 hours, with driving showers of rain, hail, and sleet. Early this morning there was a fairly heavy fall of snow, which completely covered the ground. It lasted only a short time in the township and on the flats, but the hills were covered to a fairly late hour with a thick white mantle. At time of writing snow is falling.

BRINKWORTH, August 29.—There was a fall of snow here at the time the train for Adelaide was leaving. It lasted about 10 minutes. There is every appearance of more good rain.

BRINKWORTH, August 29.—Several falls of snow have occurred, one during the night, one at 8.45 a.m., and another with hail at 9.45 a.m. The hills on Bungaree were white this morning at daylight, and remained so until 10 a.m.

BURRA, August 29.—A snowstorm was experienced at Burra to-day, and the fall at intervals was heavy. The country looked magnificent, especially when the sun came out. Residents, both young and old, were busy the greater part of the day snowballing. Nearly all the children able to make a snowball forgot all about school, and the attendance suffered in consequence. Although some folks got severe knocks, the fun was all taken in good part.

CLARENDON, August 29.—The residents of Clarendon for the first-time for many years were to-day treated to a sight of a snowfall. The cold was intense, and before noon there was a fall of heavy sleet. The flakes were abnormally large, almost massive, which showed that the cold was confined to the lower portions of the atmosphere. A few miles out of the township the fall was sufficiently heavy to whiten the ground.

CALTOWIE, August 29, 10.50 a.m.— We had one of the most beautiful sights ever witnessed here early this morning. At 6.30 snow began to fall, and in a few minutes the whole district was white, while trees, shrubs, plants, were mantled with flake. By 8 o'clock the ground was covered inches deep. Snowdrift in corners was a foot thick. It is still snowing at intervals.

CLARE, August 29, 11.36 a.m.—A heavy fall of snow occurred this morning. The whole country is completely covered.

CRYSTAL BROOK, August 29.—The weather is very cold, accompanied by high wind and driving sleet. Good rain has fallen through the district. This will benefit the crops and grass immensely.

DAVEYSTON, August 29.—We have had heavy rain, which was badly needed. A feature of this change has been the snow on the ranges, showing clearly in the sunlight after 9 o'clock this morning.

FARRELL'S FLAT, August 29.—Great surprise awaited early risers this morning, as the ground was thickly covered with snow. The snow continued at short intervals until nearly noon.

GEORGETOWN, August 29.—The district presents a phenomenal sight, the majority of the residents witnessing for the first time falling snow. Shortly after midnight a heavy hailstorm occurred, covering the ground for inches deep with hail. Since then snow has been falling periodically. Bundaleer hills are white with snow in places 4 ft. deep. Mr. Andrew Inglis, farmer, reports snow 3 to 4 in. deep all over his garden. Sixty-one points of rain has been registered.

GUMERACHA, August 29.—A considerable quantity of snow has fallen to-day. About 2 a.m. there was a fairly heavy fall, and from 11 a.m. till 1 p.m. there was an almost continuous snowstorm. Prior to that a great deal of hail fell. This afternoon we have had light hailstorms. The thermometer at about 3.30 p.m. registered 42 deg. Fahr.

GRUNTHAL, August 29.—During the last two days heavy rains have been experienced. Last night showers of hail fell. The Onkaparinga River came down a banker this morning. Snow fell between 10 and 11 o'clock for half an hour. The spectacle was one of the finest witnessed in this locality.

HOUGHTON, August 29.—For an hour this morning we had a fall of snow. Elderly residents talked of the old country, while the youngsters were busy snow- balling.

JAMESTOWN, August 23.—A magnificent sight greeted the residents this morning, when a heavy fall of snow was witnessed. It commenced about 6 o'clock, and in a short time the whole of the surrounding hills, valleys, and plains were covered with a beautiful white mantle. The sight, looking at the Bundaleer Forest and surrounding hills, was truly picturesque, and had the appearance of an Alpine scene. In the town the fall was heavy. The trees, especially the pines, in the various avenues and plantations, presented a pretty effect, the foliage being powdered with feathery flakes of snow. Snowballing was indulged in in every direction. At one place near the plantation along the creek the snow was so thick that immense snowballs, about 2 ft. to 3 ft. through, were piled one on top of the other, until a pyramid about 10 ft, high was made. In other places one would see residents, old and young, rolling immense snowballs on the grass that was covered with snow, until they attained a diameter of 4 to 5 ft. Photographers, both professional and amateur, eagerly took views of the beautiful scenes. As the snow ceased and occasional glimpses of the sun came out the sight was one that will long linger in the memories of those who were privileged to witness it. The snow fell at intervals during the whole of the day. At times it was heavy, and in the afternoon snow was lying thick on the hills and plains. It is confidently asserted that the fall here to-day is the heaviest ever experienced in this State.

KYBUNGA, August 29.—A few flakes of snow fell this morning, but hardly enough to cover the ground.

LOBETHAL, August 29.—The barometer took a sudden fall again last night, with the result that heavy rain fell in the night, and afterwards snow. This morning a white mantle covered the landscape. During the day there have been several falls of snow.

LYNDOCH, August 29.—Residents awoke from their slumbers this morning to behold a pretty sight. The Barossa Range from Williamstown across Pewsey Vale and Kayserstool was snowclad, and presented a lovely picture. A slight fall was noticed in the township. At midday snow could still be seen on the range.

MANOORA, August 29.—We have had a heavy fall of snow in the hills. All the trees are mantled this morning. It is still snowing (9.50 a.m.), but the wind is too strong for its accumulation. This is the heaviest fall since 1901.

MOUNT BRYAN, August 29.—For about four hours this morning residents were favoured with a beautiful fall of snow, which covered the ground to the extent of about 2 in., and presented a pretty sight. The hills are mantled with white, and all that is required to make a typical English scene is a robin redbreast. The residents engaged in snowballing and making snow men.

MONGOLATA, August 29. — Heavy showers fell during the night, and this morning snow fell for some time. This will do a lot of good to feed, which, although plentiful, was fast dying off. The lambing has turned out well, and stock are in splendid condition.

MYLOR, August 29.—A beautiful snow- storm was experienced this morning. It started at 9 and kept on until 1 o'clock. At times the snow fell so thickly, that one could not see above a chain ahead. Mr. McCaffrey took the school children out, and they stood in the storm with their slates above their heads catching it, after which snowballing was engaged in. It was the most beautiful sight ever witnessed here, coming as it did in the day-time, and everything being covered in a mantle of white. The hills in the distance looked exceptionally pretty with their tops gleaming when the sun shone.

MEADOWS SOUTH, August 29.—It has been cold to-day, and the glass registered down to 35 deg. This morning there was a heavy fall of snow.

MOUNT BARKER, August 29, 1.5 p.m. —Snow has fallen here several times this morning. A heavy storm occurred at about 11 o'clock. The weather is intensely cold and wet.

MARRABEL, August 29.—A heavy fall of snow occurred early this morning. It was about 4 in. deep in the paddocks, and snowballing was the order of the day. Snowballs of all sizes are to be seen everywhere, while a big snow man is on guard in the main street, dressed up with a new suit and a pumpkin hat. This has caused much fun and excitement, especially among the school children. A fall of snow about four years ago was heavier than the present fall. This will do more good to the crops than all the rain, as it will all soak into the ground.

NURIOOTPA, August 29.—The weather is intensely cold, with snow, hail, rain, and strong wind. A fall of snow was experienced this morning between 4 and 5 o'clock. The snowclad hills were a picturesque sight until well on toward midday. Snow hung on the fences on the low lands long after sunrise.

OAKBANK, August 29.—To-day has been one of the coldest experienced for some time. Those who rose early and look- ed towards the ranges were rewarded with a fine sight, as all the hilltops were covered with glistening snow. Between Oakbank and Forest Range the fall seemed to be heaviest. Several times during the morning a few falling flakes were noticed, and about 11 o'clock there was a snowstorm. The flakes were thick and large, and the fall lasted for half an hour.

ORROROO, August 29.—The weather today has been intensely cold and showery. At 1 o'clock a heavy fall of snow occurred. It was a beautiful sight. The young people engaged in snowballing. The Pekina and Blackrock hills were covered in white. The light fall of rain will wonderfully revive the crops.

PETERSBURG, August 29.—About 6 o'clock this morning snow began to fall, and continued till about 8.30. The flakes, although small, fell thickly, and the ground, trees and buildings were soon covered with the beautiful crystals. The snow lay about three-quarters of an inch thick in level places, while on ledges and drifts it accumulated to the extent of 3 or 4 in. Snowballing was soon the order of the day, and was not confined to the juveniles. A westerly wind sprang up, and soon thawed the first fall. About 10 o'clock a second fall began with flakes thicker than before. It continued for about an hour, but except in secluded spots, the snow melted as it touched the ground.

SNOWTOWN, August 29.—Rough weather was experienced last night, and a rare sight was witnessed this morning in the form of snow in the Barunga Range. There was a light deposit on one of the highest points, while in the Clare Ranges there appeared to be a considerable fall.

RIVERTON, August 29.—Following on a good farmers' rain yesterday and last night, a fall of snow occurred during the early morning. Peter's Hill and the range beyond presented a pretty sight when the sun rose, showing the pure white mantle. About 7 o'dock this morning a slight fall was experienced in the township.

ROSEWORTHY, August 29.—Snow was seen falling at an early hour this morning. We had a novel experience on the arrival of the 7.40 train from Kapunda. The tops of the carriages were sprinkled with flakes of snow. The Barossa Ranges covered with snow presented a picturesque sight. There was much excitement among the school children, most of whom had never seen snow.

SOUTH ROAD, August 29.—The range at the back of Shepherd's Hill has been covered with snow to-day, a sight seldom seen in that locality, and it has attracted much attention.

TRURO, August 29.—A rare sight was witnessed here early this morning, when snow fell. Mount Rufus and other high peaks were covered with a mantle of pure white, that glistened and threw back the rays of the rising sun. Again at 1.45 snow fell. Children indulged in snowballing. The weather is bitterly cold, with a blustering wind.

TEROWIE August 29, 10 a.m.—Snow has been falling with short intervals for several hours. Everything is enveloped in a beautiful mantle of white. Cameras are in evidence, and amateur photographers are running around begging, borrowing, or stealing plates. The hills to the east look lovely when the sun peeps out every now and again. Appearances point to a continuation of the fall.

TARLEE, August 29.—Last night a cold change from the south came up, with rain, hail, and snow. At 7 o'clock this morning there was a slight fall on the hills, and again at 11 the hills were covered with a white mantle.

TANUNDA. August 29.—The hills surrounding the eastern side of the township were covered with snow this morning. The sight was beautiful and exhilarating. The old inhabitants discussed the phenomenon with great interest. The previous fall, on July 28, 1901, was much heavier than the present one, which extended well south along the course of the Barossa Ranges. The snow was seen until late in the evening. Mr. Sauer, a carrier from Angaston, reported that he had never experienced such a fall before. His horses, van, and the driver were literally covered with snow-flakes.

URAIDLA, August 29.—This morning the hills presented quite a picturesque appearance. The ground was covered with snow.

WHITE HUT, August 29.—The sight which met the eyes of the residents early this morning was one which for beauty could hardly be surpassed the world over. Snow was on the hillsides, the trees, sheds, posts, on the window ledges, and every- where in fact where it was possible for it to find lodgment. There has been snow here before, but never at this season of the year when the green of the trees and fields contrasts so beautifully with the white mantle. Two English ladies who have been out here for 14 years and have not seen snow since they left the old country were overcome by the sight. They said that they had never seen larger flakes even in England, nor had they ever witnessed a more severe snowstorms The heaviest fall took place at about 8 o'clock, when it was impossible to distinguish any object a short distance away. At about 7 o'clock this morning snowballing was in full swing. At one place where some English ladies were staying a snowballing contest took place, England v. Australia. As the Australians were all men it is needless to say which side was victorious, even though, as some of the Australians remarked, they had never had any practice before.

WATERVALE, August 20, 10.50 a.m.— Quite a heavy fall of snow has been experienced since about 4 a.m. The hills are well covered, and present a beautiful sight.

WIRRABARA, August 29.—After an intensely cold morning and sleety showers, a snow fall of a quarter of an hour's duration delighted residents at about noon today. Unfortunately the snow melted immediately on reaching the ground, but the sight was a lovely one. The temperature is down to 38 deg. Heavy gales blew last night, and there have been frequent hailstorms to-day.

WOODSIDE, August 29,—Extraordinary weather has been experienced during the past few days. Last night we had the rare combination of hail and thunder, while the wind blew half a gale. Although early this morning the sun shone brightly, the wintry conditions were resumed before 10 o'clock. After an hour of intense cold snow com- menced to fall, and continued for about 20 minutes. Although the flakes were large, they melted on touching the ground, but some of the higher hills, especially those around Charleston, were snowcapped.

YONGALA, August 29.—After a rough and stormy night the residents of Yongala awoke this morning to find their town and the surrounding country one glistening mass of white. Snow was falling, eddying, whirling in a blinding, glittering maze of wondrous flakes that quickly covered everything within view. Scarcely within the annals of the oldest residents has such a truly English snow scene presented itself to the delighted gaze of all beholders, as is witnessed here to-day. The hills to the south are a wonderfully beautiful spectacle, and everywhere, as far as the eye can reach, the country is garmented in pure spotless white. Snowballing is the order of the day, and merry groups of well-ammunitioned snowballers were early astir, making the air resound with their delighted shrieks of laughter as each well-directed shot struck home. Unsuspecting pedestrians and quiet elderly gentlemen out looking for views with their cameras, were lured into the fray, and the fun waxed fast and furious. It is a coincidence that on the same date last year the distant Mannanarie Ranges were coated in a similar manner. What a time the children had this morning!. Snow everywhere inches deep—in places feet deep—and not yet school time! What boy or girl either could resist having a shy ? From the age of five or six to, well say 50 for men—boys and girls of tender and mature growth alike revelled in the exhilarating pastime of snowballing, little caring to he reminded of the story of the boys and the frogs. But the opportunity was too good to be missed, and the rarity of such a snowstorm is sufficient excuse for any roughness the ' frogs" considered was used. The uplands of Yongala Estate and the distant Mannanarie Ranges present a charming sight just now, and to-day's snowstorm will remain long in the memory as constituting Yongala's record fall.

YACKA, August 29.—Snow fell about 9 o'clock this morning. It was plainly visible on the hills about six miles east from the township.

A travelling correspondent wrote on Tuesday:—"Call us early, hostler,' do!" was the cry last night at Petersburg. Yet when we were aroused at half-past 4 and the icy wind bit into our marrows we grizzled a lot, and were consoled with the advice that the "early bird catches the worm.” At 6.30 between Yongala and Belalie the sky darkened and the lookout ahead was gloomy. Soon there were cries from the junior passengers of "Look at the hail.” But, no! It was fine, driving snow, with a little rain, and as the train climbed slowly up the Belalie hills we entered a glorious snowstorm. We dared all railway rules, jumped out of the moving train to make snowballs, and snowballed the passengers as we moved along. At first the fall was fine and light, hut as we moved along everything was clothed in a beautiful white mantle, and the rough hills and valleys had never looked so lovely before. The horses and cattle stood with their backs turned to the wind, their manes and tails snowy white. One old draught galloped away across a wheat crop, and tried to keep himself warm. Close to Belalie we passed an unfortunate drover trying to get a small mob of white sheep to the Jamestown market. They would not face the keen wind. At Belalie all passengers turned out to snowball. So interested in the fun were the travellers that the train had a fair start before some decided to board again. As we ran into Jamestown the town presented a pretty sight. The wind had dropped, and the snow was falling straight down in large flakes. There was over an inch on the ground. Every one in Jamestown was snowballing, and business was almost at a standstill. One irri-table gentleman with an umbrella lost his temper. He soon had a pair of strong arms about him, and was rolled in the snow. The flakes are still falling steadily at 10 o'clock, and the snow is 2 or 3 in. thick everywhere.

Bagot, Shakes, & Lewis, Limited, received the following telegram from their Jamestown representative on Tuesday morning:—Heavy snow set in this morning at 6, followed by fine hail. It is now snowing heavily. Snowballing in street. Sale knocked out.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162438735
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19013171
APA citation
SNOWBALLS AT A DANCE. (1905, September 2). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 44. Retrieved January 8, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162438735

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1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (continued).

There's an item in "The Advertiser" titled "THE WEATHER MAP" published Wednesday 30 August 1905, showing the weather map dated 29-8-05 (snow day). There's a reference to it being "this morning's map" but I can't see any more precise time of day given for the map. Maybe it was compiled from 9am data?

The item was published in The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 30 August 1905 Page 7. The link to the item on Trove is http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4955868

I've screen-grabbed the item from the Todd Folios into 6 images and posted them below. The address of the item on the Todd Folios is http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1905/19050829t02_hi-res.jpg





1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (adding more newspaper items from Trove).

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326978

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Mount Bryan.
Sept. 4. {Monday 4th - Miles}
The weather has been the chief topic of conversation during the past week. We have actually had fine weather, hail, snow and to end up with dust on Friday night last, and
began with heavy frost in the morning. Truly, a bad start from a meteorogical point of view for September. On Tuesday morning last {29th August - Miles}, when people arose, much to their astonishment, the whole district was one vast sheet of white, and was a handsome sight to behold, and one never to be forgotten—even with little ones, who indulged in snow-balling. On account of the snow not thawing it was extremely cold, and life was a chilly one. It snowed incessantly all day, and snow flakes were pretty. Some of the residents of Mt. Bryan ascended the Mount and enjoyed themselves immensely, and the climb instead of rocks was one of snow, snow-balling and building snow men and women was carried on. Mr W Quinn, of Mount Bryan East, states never has he seen snow thicker than was the case on Tuesday last. Snow still lies on Mount Bryan, and in places is 6ft to 7ft deep."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326978
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Mount Bryan. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326978

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326997/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"World's End.
Sept. 1.
We have had a splendid fall of rain and snow since my last letter, and quite a pleasing change has overcome this neighbourhood. The sight of the snow was really grand, and to the colonials proved a source of great enjoyment."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326997
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
VOICES FROM THE PEOPLE. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326997

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326996/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Black Springs.
Sept. 1.
The only thing to report this week is the fall of snow, which happened on August 29 . The night previous was not extra cold, and it may be safely said that not one resident expected snow to fall, especially so late in the year."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326996
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Black Springs. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326996

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37327002/4756219

{quoting the whole item}

"Gums,
Aug. 29.
Heavy showers fell through the night and also to-day, accompanied by a strong wind ; 15 points of rain were registered. This morning early when glancing westward a beautiful
sight met the eye. The Burra ranges were clad in what appeared to be a heavy raiment of snow. Up till midday they were still white from summit to base, and even at the late hour of writing (3 p.m.) the higher peaks show out white when the sun touches them. We are anxiously awaiting particulars. Shearing commenced yesterday with a full team of men, but after shearing 300 sheep operations had to be suspended for a day or so owing to the inclement weather."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327002
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Gums. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 22, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327002

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37327001/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Hallett.
Sept. 2.
By some of the residents it was prophesied that snow would fall during August, but their predictions were not seriously considered, and when least expected snow fell, and clad the whole surrounding neighbourhood in a mantle of white. The fall was particularly heavy on the Mount, and there is yet plenty of snow to be seen. Not being satisfied with Tuesday's fall a number of residents visited the Mount on Sunday {3rd September - Miles}, and it is said that snow will remain there for at least another fortnight."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327001
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Hallett. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 22, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327001

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37327000/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Mt. Bryan East.
September 4 1905.
The school picnic, which was to have been held on Wednesday last {?? correspondent probably meant Tuesday 29th not Wednesday 30th - Miles}, had to be postponed, owing to the very inclement weather. We had a fair share of the snow which fell so abundantly on that day, and although five days have elapsed since then the summit of the Mount is still covered."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327000
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Mt. Bryan East. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 22, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37327000

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326999/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Booborowie.
Sept. 2. {Saturday - Miles}
We have to record a fall of snow in this part. The residents forgot all else and indulged in snowballing on Tuesday {29th August - Miles}. The fall was not so heavy as on the last occasion, but the storm was much heavier while it lasted. The surrounding country was a most beautiful sight, and one that will long he remembered. At time of writing snow can be seen in some of the gullies of the surrounding country."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326999
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Booborowie. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326999

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326994/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Bundey.
Aug. 29.
Rain, hail and snow. From sadness and sorrow to joy and jollity. Such was the case to-day. This morning the top of the Californian Ranges wore a beautiful white coat of snow. Smart showers fell at intervals during the day, accompanied by hail and very heavy wind with a few scattered flakes of snow."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326994
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Bundey. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326994

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326993/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Collinsville.
Sept 4.
The weather during the past week has been extraordinary—wind, dust, gravel, hail, rain, and, last but not least, snow, which was very interesting to we settlers. Kelchowla hills and Pandappa ranges was a sight well worth looking at, and the oldest residents have never before experienced such heavy fall, and so far as known stands as a record ; 47 points of rain fell, consequently a more favourable aspect has resulted, but the chill never even killed the caterpillar, showing again the proverb, “ What is no good never comes to any harm.” "

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326993
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Collinsville. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326993

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326980/4756219

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"Whyte Yarcowie.
Sept. 4.
Many are the blessings cast upon this part of the earth in the form of watery particles congealed into while or transparent crystals or flakes in the air and falling to the earth exhibiting a great variety of beautiful forms commonly called snow. Starting about five o'clock in the morning on Tuesday last like a continuous swarm of insects near a stagnant creek the cold, biting and yet exhilarating air began to cast its unblemished, unstained, spotless flakes over mother earth, making the surrounding hills snow-capped, the trees snow-clad, and every one, that had the pleasure of being out in it were gifted with a white mantle and a snow crown. As the morning wore on the fall became heavier, and by daylight one would believe they had been suddenly conveyed into some unknown region of bliss, and by the time the Broken Hill express arrived here the picture was one never to be forgotten, and the passengers were rather inclined to spend the day here. The Port Adelaide football team, returning from Broken Hill, had a few decent snowballs deposited amongst them. Had Chancer been alive, and had witnessed the scene he would have quoted “ The field of snow with the eagle of black therein,” or “ So shows the snowy dove trooping with the crows,” the contrast being so great with the usual appearance of this district. Everyone, young and old, were soon out in the midst of it, the old folks returning to the day of youth, the younger generations, with the blood of their ancestors tingling in their veins, soon put forth their combative powers of snow-balling , this was carried on with the greatest of harmony, the crys of the young in their delight rising the thoughts of their youth and joy in the older generations. No one was spared, colour or country made no difference, had their been any coloured human being present the black would have been turned to white. A timid person on the sight of a snowball travelling in the direction of his brain-box could well quote the Shakespearian writing “ A faint, cold fear runs through my veins that almost freezes up the heart of life,” and by the time he had thus quoted, the collision with the missile of snowy flakes would be over. Work was cast aside, breakfast was not thought of, the guid wife forsook for once her better half, and joined in the exhilarating fight ; sallow cheeks were disposed of the blood of youth showing forth like rosy apples on a tree on the cheeks of all. The photographer was soon at work, snatching scenes which so rarely are presented, and some splendid views were taken ; snow balls were rolled up till it was beyond the power of humanity to move them ; snow men were made, one being placed on a pedestal at the railway station for the interest of the public, comfortably smoking a pipe and embracing two empty whisky bottles : it was here that a grand representative gathering took place before the camera and the job was done with one glass to the surprise of the photographer. It continued to blow cold during the day with blasts of hail, rain and snow. This timely fall of watery mixture will prove a boom to the farmers, and all others dependnig on Nature for their livelihood, and the crops and grass, which were beginning to weary for the want of moisture should once more go on their way rejoicing."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326980
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
Whyte Yarcowie. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326980

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37326982/4756219

{"The locality of Stanley Flat is situated in South Australia in the Mid North region, approximately 6 km north of Clare along the Main North Road. It is where the Clare Racecourse is situated, as well as an institute hall and a number of winery cellar door outlets." Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Flat,_South_Australia - Miles}

{quoting the snow-relevant text only}

"STANLEY FLAT LETTER.

August 29 {Tuesday - Miles}
We have been treated to all sorts of weather lately. Rain, hail wind and snow. Two or three days of last week was positively hot. but a high wind rose an Monday, when rain set in, and on Tuesday morn it was plainly visible a heavy snow storm had fallen during the night, and had thawed somewhat before morn, but still heavy drifts of it were up against houses, fences, straw-stacks, trees, etc. All day Tuesday it snowel, rained and hailed alternately ; sometimes the snow storms were so dense you could not see 200 yards before you. All the imported articles of this part must have been reminded of the old country. Snowballing we not indulged in, for, with the glass at 30, we felt like creeping near to a big log fire, more congenial. It rained all last night again and to-day ; we seem plunged into the depths of winter. A good deal of spraying for codlin moth, black scale, etc., had just been done in the orchards which have been work and expense in vain, as the rain has washed the liquid from the trees. During the high gale of yesterday a new iron tank at the school was blown over with such force as to cut several holes in it. To-day all the creeks, washaways and gullies are running bankers."

{Now the article moves to describing a school picnic on Friday September 1st with no mention of snow falling - Miles}
September 2.
Yesterday {Friday September 1st - Miles} we had our annual 8 hours' day picnic on the Bungaree estate, kindly lent by Messrs. Hawker, but a more disagreeable day could not be imagined. Almost Vt gale blew all day from N.W., and only t. 4 a break wind was made by cutting down a lot of branches and piling them against ees, our provisions, laid out on table cloths, woWld have been blown away, but despite all, Ibout a dozen trap loads of school children and adults turned up, and things were made rather lively by scrambles of oranges, almonds and 'wjes, kindly provided by the tradesmen of Clare and the children seemed so engaged in the fun Bey forgot a gale was in force.

{Now the article moves to snow in Clare and it's not clear from the article on what day the snow in this paragraph fell but I think it most likely Tuesday August 29 - Miles}
The snow fell heavily in Clare, and sor heavy fights with snowballs were indulged in both woman and men were at it, and several windows were broken. Whilst one man was in the act of throwing at another the man bobbed his head aside and the ball went through a plate-glass window, and he had to pay 9s 6d damages, but all seemed satisfied, as they had some splendid fun they may not get the chance of for years."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326982
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756219
APA citation
STANLEY FLAT LETTER. (1905, September 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved April 26, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37326982

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Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919) Tuesday 29 August 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/109483683

The article on Trove was corrected by "jeff.noble"

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"The Petersburg Times
AND NORTHERN ADVERTISER.
Tuesday, August 29, 1905."

"Snow commenced to fall in Petersburg at two o'clock this morning, and continued right on into the day. Advantage was of course taken by the young people—nor did the older stand quite aloof—to indulge in the time honored game of snowballing. Passengers along the street were suddenly saluted with avalanches of snow, and the effect in some cases made it appear that the missles had been rather tightly squeezed. The whole, however, was good humoredly taken, as was indeed the better course, since even our municipal representatives could not, when they appeared, claim exemption. Rain also fell, the registration for the month of August at the local postoffice up to nine o'clock this morning being 48 points. It is now three years since last snow fell here."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109483683
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10673718
APA citation
THE Petersburg times AND NORTHERN ADVERTISER. (1905, August 29). Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919), p. 2. Retrieved January 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109483683

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 30 August 1905 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824625

{quoting entire article}

"SPLENDID AGRICULTURAL RAINS.
The following telegrams were received by Messrs. James Bell & Co. from their country representatives on Tuesday:—Yongala.—Heavy falls of snow all day; better than inch of rain; prospects now good. Petersburg.— Heavy falls of snow: fair rain since early morning, equal to half an inch. Paskeville.—Rain registering inch yesterday till noon: still raining: little snow and hail; squally. Owen.—About 1 in. last night and to-day: prospects good: still threatening. Port Wakefield.—Splendid showers last night, and again this morning; prospects bright. Kapunda.—Three-quarters of an inch of rain: still raining: prospects good: snow in places. Ardrossan.—Splendid rains have fallen here. 0.57 up to now. Balaklava.—Had splendid rains last night and to-day, about 1 in. Georgetown.—Splendid rain, also heavy snow. 70 points; best prospects: still snow and rain. Wallaroo.— Splendid showers to-day: every appearance of them continuing: will greatly benefit crops. Snowtown.—Much-needed rains now falling; 57 points up to now.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824625
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421546
APA citation
SPLENDID AGRICULTURAL RAINS. (1905, August 30). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 6. Retrieved January 20, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824625

************************************************

Mt Lofty August 29th 1905.


Above photo: Snowballing scene on the side of the road. Photographed August 29th, 1905.
Source: State Library of South Australia.
Photo B 47608
Permanent link: Permanent link B 47608

**********************************************************

1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (yet more newspaper items from Trove).

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 30 August 1905 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824610/4421546

{quoting observations relevant to this snowfall from among forays into poetic text referring to snow more generally}

A WORLD OF WHITE.
RECORD FALL OF SNOW.

" ... what took place in many places in South Australia on Monday night and during Tuesday. In its mantle of white the landscape was changed in appearance from Australian to English. Snow fell in numerous localities, but in no place more heavily than on the Mount Lofty Ranges. Adelaideans will remember the big snowstorms in the hills on Sunday, July 28, 1901, and again on June 30 of last year, but the present fall is easily a record. Old residents of the ranges, who have been bred and born there, say that they remember nothing like the present visitation. The country was transformed into a wonderful world of white. “Pure us snow” is a common expression, but nobody can understand its significance till he has seen it lying on the ground so cold, so pure, so beautiful that even to touch it were a shame. Early on Tuesday morning citizens were complaining of the cold, and scanning the distance hills all capped with white.
The word was soon passed around that there was snow on the ranges, and if ocular demonstration was needed l rcels of the frozen article brought down by residents in the hills would supply it. People were naturally eager to see the snow falling, and numerous parties were quickly organized to visit the ranges.

—Up in the Mountains.—
A representative of The Register proceeded to the ranges in a De Dion motor car. ... At the Glen Osmond terminus a teamster had pulled up to give his horses a drink at the water trough. The trolly was loaded with wood, and the redgum logs were powdered with snow. ... At the Devil's Elbow it started to hail, and by the time the top of the rise was reached the hard little balls of frozen rain were hammering merrily on the occupants of the car.
—The Eagle-on-the- Hill.—
At the Eagle-on-the Hill the mantle of white was the feature of the landscape. The garden at the back of the well-known hostelry was hidden in snow. ... The eagle behind his iron bars looked mopey and sad. The noble bird would rather have been soaring in the great expanse of blue and looking down on the white world.
—Snowballing.—
As the car left the hotel the proprietor shouted out— “Look out for the snowballs.” ... At the junction of the roads there was an army of boys and girls, and they were simply fiendish in their desire to hit passing travellers. Their supply of snowballs was enormous and those who had to run the gauntlet fairly shook in their shoes. ...
—Falling Snow.—
As the summit road was ascended snow began to fall thick and fast. ... There was something in the cold and enchanting scene that seemed to purify one's body, mind, and soul. Even the charred trees were rendered beautiful by the snow that lay upon them. It was a perfect study in black and white.
—At the Mount.—
Words are weak to describe the wonderful scene which was beheld at the Mount. The ground was covered in snow, in some cases to the depth of a foot, the rooftops were hidden beneath a mantle of white, and the trees were powdered thick with flakes. Frozen masses of crystals bent down the branches of the pine trees, while the great acacia trees, a mass of golden bloom sprinkled with white, were dreams of loveliness. The hedges were surmounted by a sheet of snow, and yellow daffodils and purple lilac rose up laughingly from heir beds of white. ... "

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824610
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421545
APA citation
A WORLD OF WHITE. (1905, August 30). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved February 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824610

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 31 August 1905 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824790

{quoting entire article}

WEATHER PROSPECTS FOR THE HOLIDAY.

Mr. Griffiths remarked on Wednesday:— “The weather during yesterday continued very unsettled, cold, and stormy, and further snowfalls, hail, and rain occurred in the agricultural parts of the State. At Hallett, Terowie, and Jamestown it was snowing nearly all day yesterday, and at Melrose there was a continuous fall for four hours. Rain extended up as far as Hawker, but again the upper northern districts had only very light showers. Moderate to heavy rains were recorded in the central districts, and on the Mount Lofty Ranges, light to moderate showers being recorded elsewhere. In all 82 stations in the agricultural areas recorded over a quarter of an inch for the past 24 hours, the maximum registration being 63 points at Meadows and Uraidla. The storm centre, which yesterday's weather chart showed between Mount Gambier and the western coast of Tasmania, has moved through Bass Straits to the New South Wales coasts, and barometers in this State have risen very rapidly. As a consequence, we have much finer weather this morning, though it is still stormy on the south-east coast, and snow is still being recorded in a few places in the north. On the ranges in the eastern States it is now snowing heavily, and the weather is generally becoming cold, unsettled, and stormy in the neighbourhood of Cape Howe. During the next 24 hours further showers may be expected in this State. Barometers will continue to rise, and finer conditions develop. A high-pressure area is rapidly approaching us from the westward, and the probabilities are that we shall have fine weather for the holiday.”

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824790
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421554
APA citation
WEATHER PROSPECTS FOR THE HOLIDAY. (1905, August 31). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 4. Retrieved February 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824790

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Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954) Thursday 31 August 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96961360

{quoting entire article}

"THE WEATHER.
Heavy Rain, Hail, Snow, and Squalls.
The weather for the past few days has been of exceptionally cold, rough, and wintry nature, establishing a record for hailstorms, which have taken place almost by tbe dozen in the hills and south district, Monday night and Tuesday having so rapid a succession of them that banks of hailstones lay piled up in many parts right through the day and night. In the hills squalls were of unusually severe nature, the wind at times rising to hurricane power, doing a good deal of damage in parts to fruit trees and gardens generally, and in one or two parts flood waters added to the damage done by washing away whole plots of vegetables and garden soil. Snow fell heavily on the Mt. Lofty, Flinders, and Willunga ranges, and also on the northern plains, and many places in the state which had never before been visited by snow had unique experiences, much to the delight of the inhabitants. The scene on the hills was very beautiful, but the high wind and the sleety rain which fell at frequent intervals made out of doors sightseeing rather too unpleasant for people to indulge in as much of it as they would have done under more favorable circumstances. The snowfall did not extend to Strathalbyn, but reached to within about four miles of the town, in the direction of Macclesfield."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96961360
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9488654
APA citation
THE WEATHER. (1905, August 31). Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved January 30, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96961360

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Friday 1 September 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146306653

{quoting entire article}

"A SNOW STORM.
Heavy Fall in the Hills.
The winter through which we have now nearly passed has been a particularly cold and wet one, the atmosphere frequently savoring of the Frigid rather than the Temperate Zone. Snow has fallen on several occasions in some of the Hills districts, but it was not until Tuesday of this week that “Winter's snowy pinions shook the white down in the air” in any great quantity. The scene at Mount Barker at 11 a.m., when the flakes came down in great density, was typical of that during the record fall on the last Saturday and Sunday in July of 1901, but the storm not being very long continued the landscape did
not on this occasion become snow capped, and, much to the disappointment of the expectant ones, snow-balling could not be very greatly indulged in. A similar storm occurred about 4 a.m., and “feathers” were noticed descending again soon after day break, from which time until evening snow, hail, and rain came down at frequent intervals. The fall in the Mount Lofty district was much heavier than here, and the landscape was transformed into a wide expanse of whiteness several inches deep and which was plainly visible in Adelaide and from elevated peaks here and elsewhere. Snowballing was heartily indulged in and effigies built by the small fry, who everywhere revelled in the novel experience and gave travellers on the road a particularly warm time of it. Snow also fell plentifully at Yongala and other places in the North, the storm there being the biggest on record."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306653
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17353970
APA citation
A SNOW STORM. (1905, September 1). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved January 30, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306653

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The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147134814

{only snow-relevant text quoted}

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1905. .....
"Intensely Cold Weather. — Tuesday was one of the coldest days ever experienced in Narracoorte, and that seemed to be the general experience throughout South Australia.
It felt as if it was at freezing point all day, there being a bitter cold wind from the south, and we had several sharp showers of hail. Monday night and early Tuesday morning there was a heavy fall of rain, which registered 45 points at the Narracoorte post-office gauge at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning. A gale blew throughout Tuesday night with occasional showers of rain. The storm was at its height between 12 and 2 o'clock on Wednesday morning, but we have not heard of any damage being done. The rainfall registered at the Narracoorte post-office on Wednesday morning was 12 points. Wednesday and yesterday were comparatively fine, but it was still very cold. Snow fell in various parts of the state. On Tuesday morning the residents of Adelaide found the Mount Lofty hills covered with snow, and it presented a magnificent and unique sight. The snow continued to fall at intervals throughout Tuesday, and waggons travelling in the hills were covered with it. The snow was inches deep in the hills and snow-balling was engaged in by the residents. It was the heaviest fall of snow known by the oldest residents, and in many places it was six inches deep. At Clare the country for miles around was covered with snow. At Jamestown, in the North, there was a heavy fall of snow, and people ceased business to indulge in the novel pastime of snow-balling. Snow fell at Watervale, Wirrabarra, Terowie, Petersburg, Riverton, and many other places in the North. At Petersburg it was 3 in. deep. The Barossa hills and the Flinders Range were covered with snow throughout Tuesday. The Broken Hill express was 35 minutes late in arriving at Hallett through the passengers getting out at every station where there was snow to engage in snow-balling. All the highlands throughout the North were bathed in white, and the unique scene was keenly enjoyed by the people. The people in the South-East had to be content on Tuesday with common-place showers of hail."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147134814
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17474880
APA citation
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1905. (1905, September 1). The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved January 29, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147134814

************************************************

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 8.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56849821

{quoting entire article}

"SNOW IN THE COUNTRY.
APPILA-YARROWIE. August 30.—Yesterday was undoubtedly the coldest for the year. Rain, hail, and snow fell unceasingly. The Bundaleer and Mannary Ranges were a magnificent sight covered with snow.
HAMMOND, August 29.—Snow fell at different parts of the district to-day. The Mounts Brown and Remarkable and Horseshoe Ranges presented a picturesque appearance clad with the white mantle of snow.
MOUNT COMPASS, August 31.—Snow fell at 10.30 a.m. yesterday, and continued for a few hours.
UROONDA. August 29.—A slight fall of snow was witnessed to-day.
WILMINGTON, August 30.—Yesterday afternoon snow fell over the Flinders Range, and this morning it was an extremely pretty to see the snow glistering in the sun from the top of Mount Brown to Mount Remarkable, a distance of 25 miles.
WHITE HUT, August 30.—Snow, hail, and rain continued to fall at intervals during the whole of yesterday. Once in the afternoon snow fell heavily. Almost all traces of the snow have disappeared, except in a few places, where it is still lying on the ground. Snow men still stand here and there, looming up in the dark like ghosts."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56849821
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4422592
APA citation
SNOW IN THE COUNTRY. (1905, September 1). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 8. Retrieved January 29, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56849821

************************************************

The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Friday 1 September 1905 Page3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146306631

{quoting entire article"

"NAIRNE.
Tuesday opened cold and wet, and there were not wanting signs that snow was near at hand. At 10.45 a.m. the flakes began to fall in earnest, and the storm lasted for 20 minutes. The tops of Sloggett's and Kenning's hills were covered on the town side. The young people were not slow to scrape up the snow and pelt each other. Several lighter falls occurred during the day, but the rain and hail soon swept away all traces of the snow."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306631
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17353970
APA citation
NAIRNE. (1905, September 1). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 3, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306631

************************************************

The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954)
Friday 1 September 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146306644

{quoting entire article}

"MOUNT PLEASANT.
Between 3 and 4 a.m. on Tuesday a heavy fall of snow and hail occurred at Mount Pleasant, and early risers were greeted with a novel sight, the ground being quite white. During the day several heavy falls of snow occurred, and the weather was bitterly cold."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306644
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17353970
APA citation
MOUNT PLEASANT. (1905, September 1). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved February 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146306644

************************************************

Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/108435712

{quoting snow-relevant text only from longer article}

{heading unreadable, may be "City Scratchings" - Miles}
"By Timoleon.
Cold ? The word fails to convey an adequate idea of the suffering of citizens during the last few days. Everybody is talking of taking a single ticket for some warmer clime. The Mount Lofty Ranges presented a beautiful sight on Tuesday morning. The ridges were tipped with "beautiful snow," and the hillsides were covered with a white instead of their
usual green mantle. City thoroughfares were swept with a blinding sleet and hail, and people ran for shelter, and huddled themselves in front of fires. It was a cold snap, and no mistake. A number of citizens hastened to the mountains by motor and cab to engage in the frolicsome pastime of snowballing, about which the majority of us only know just about as much as our fathers have told us. If this is the sort of weather that accompanies "My Lady Snow," then snowballing is not all that it is ''cracked up to be.""

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108435712
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10566687
APA citation
City Scratchings. (1905, September 1). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 5. Retrieved May 13, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108435712

***********************************************

Bunyip (Gawler, SA : 1863 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97595781

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

PINKERTON PLAINS, August 29.
"... The weather has been dry for the last month but a change came up on Friday, when 34 points were registered To-day has been fearfully cold with heavy showers of hail, 1 inch 19 points being registered since Friday."

"LYNDOCH, August 29 Residents awoke from their slumbers this morning to behold a pretty sight The Barossa range from Williamstown across Pewsey Vale and Kaiserstool was scow clad, and presented a love y picture A slight fall was noticed in the township At midday snow could still be seen on the range "

"NURIOOTPA, August 29 The weather is intensely cold, with snow, hail, rain, and strong wind A fall of snow was experienced this morning between 4 and 5 o'clock. The snowclad hills were a picturesque sight until well on toward mid-day. Snow hung on the fences on the low lands long after sunrise."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97595781
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9602821
APA citation
PISKERTON PLAINS, August 29. (1905, September 1). Bunyip (Gawler, SA : 1863 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved May 10, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97595781

***********************************************

Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97380408

{quoting snow-relevant text from longer article}

"Notes from Auburn.
[By our own Correspondent].
August 30."
" ... Snow.— A slight fall of snow occurred yesterday, but it was accompanied by intermit e it showers of rain, and therefore melted immediately it reached mother earth. There were also several showers of hail during the day ... ".

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97380408
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9622419
APA citation
Notes from Auburn. (1905, September 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 7, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97380408

***********************************************
Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97380404

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article}

News Letters.

"MOUNT BRYAN, August 29.
A splendid fall of snow occurred this morning. It continued intermittently from daybreak until midday, the snow showers being of much longer duration than the intervals between. A little also fell this afternoon. Owing to the strong wind the snow has not lodged on trees to anything like the extent it did four years ago, consequently the scenic effect has not nearly equalled that of 1901. There was, however, more drift on this occasion."

"BRINKWORTH, ...
August 29. Three falls of snow occurred here, one early this morning, one at 9.45 a.m., and one at 10.45 a.m. The latter was preceded by a fall of light hail. The wind was from the south-west and bitterly cold, and at time of writing (noon) is still so. The Bungaree hills showed up white this morning until 10 o'clock."

"BLYTH, August 30. ... On Tuesday morning last those who were not out of their slumbers were suddenly aroused by those who were at the unusual sight of snow falling. There was hardly a big enough fall to indulge in snowballing, hut the scene by those who were lucky enough to see it will never be forgotton. There was another fall in the afternoon, but only a very small one."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97380404
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9622419
APA citation
News Letters. (1905, September 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved May 6, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97380404

***********************************************

1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! (two more newspaper items from Trove).

Below are two more newspaper articles with snow-relevant reports to add to the long collection above. The collection now contains what I consider to be the very substantial majority of all newspaper articles on the Trove database containing snow-relevant text on the August 29th 1905 fall, but not all such articles. In terms of town correspondents reporting in to the papers from country towns, it's likely to be one of the most widely reported snow event in SA's recorded history.

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 31 August 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55824749

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

THE COUNTRY.
CHERRY GARDENS, August 29.—The extreme coldness of the past live days cul- minated this morning in the heaviest fall of snow ever experienced in Cherry Gar- dens. The oldest inhabitants admit that they can remember nothing to equal it. It began to snow at 10.40 a.m., and continued without intermission for 40 minutes. The surrounding country was soon decked in a mantle of white, and snowballing was in- dulged in. The snow-capped peaks of Mount Lofty were much admired this morning. We have gauged 1.74 of rain since Friday.
FOREST RANGE, August 29.—The last day or two has been bitterly cold. At day- break this morning the place was covered with snow, and snowballs were gathered. In some places the snow was an inch deep, but it melted away as daylight came. Falls of snow and hail continued all day.
QUORN, August 30.—The weather was intensely cold here yesterday. During the night snow fell all along the Flinders Range. The eastern slopes were covered in patches. The Bald Hills of Yarrah and Wyacca were completely covered.
STOCKWELL, August 29.—There was a heavy fall of snow here this morning at about 5.30. It was not long before the ground was fully covered. The hills in the district looked pretty, with their white mantle, and it was well past noon before the snow faded away.
WHYTE YARCOWIE, August 29.—The residents of this township were agreeably surprised this morning when, on rising, they were surrounded by a heavy fall of snow. The fall continued up until noon, and was a sight to be remembered by many people, especially those who have been used to hotter climates and have never seen snow except on distant hills. Snowballing was in full swing all the morning by both young and old.
YONGALA ESTATE, August 29.—A wonderful and unique spectacle has been witnessed by the residents to-day. They awoke to find a thick covering of snow over everything. It varied in depth from 2 in. up to about a foot, and the view strong- ly reminded one of an English winter scene. During the whole day snow has been fall- ing, and the residents and school children have been amusing themselves with snow balling. The ranges on both sides present a beautiful sight, especially when the sun breaks through the clouds and reveals a picture dazzlingly white. It is many years since such a heavy and continuous fall has been experienced.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824749
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4421553
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1905, August 31). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 3. Retrieved February 4, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55824749

**********************************************

Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954) Friday 1 September 1905 Page 12.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/166964260

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

Country News.
PETERSBURG, August 28.
After a spell of frost and dry weather, which was playing havoc with the crops, the early risers were greeted this morning with a snow storm, which continued at intervals through the day. After each storm the landscape presented a wonderful appearance, everything being covered with a mantle of white; the effect at the railway yard was splendid, engines and trucks laden with coal being black, and the snow presenting such a contrast. The Mannanarie Hills in the distance also presented a fine sight; it seemed to be heavier over there. Every one seemed to relish snowballing, so much so that none stood on their dignity but all joined in the merry fight, and business was more or less suspended during the day. The snow has not all gone yet, and promises to continue through the night. It will do a great amount of good, as the country was beginning to look a sorry sight after the very drying winds of last week.

YONGALA, August 29.
A most unusual spectacle met the eye of all except very early risers this morning. About 6 a.m. a smart shower of hail fell. This was soon followed by a steady fall of snow, and for about three hours everything exposed was clothed in a mantle of snow. The sight was rare and beautiful. Stock felt very uncomfortable with a coat of snow on their backs, and vegetation all covered under foot; but the youth of the town had a good time snowballing, young ladies and girls being especially to the fore. Even age and honour did not save one from the well-directed shower of snowballs. It was quite amusing to see the old Town Clerk, the bank manager, postmaster, and policeman, trying to dodge their missiles.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166964260
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19591552
APA citation
Country Mews. (1905, September 1). Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved February 5, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166964260

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1905 - August 29th - blockbuster snow event! - links to the Charles Todd weather folios

Here are links to the Charles Todd weather folios for the five days centred around this August 29th 1905 event, where you can find further weather maps, meteorological information and reports. Two clicks are needed to fully enlarge the images that appear when you click on any of the links below.
27th August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050827.html

28th August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050828.html

29th August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050829.html

30th August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050830.html

31st August 1905 http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19050831.html

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1905 snow events other than the August 29th blockbuster fall.

I made a search of South Australian newspapers in the Trove database for 1905 snow events in South Australia other than the blockbuster August 29th event, using the keywords snow hail (so an article needed to have both words somewhere in the text to be found by the search). I may do a more detailed search at some time in the future but this one will suffice for the present purposes. It seems there were no other widespread substantial falls in 1905. But with today's much bigger population and with modern transport and communications and snowchasers and digicams and mobile phone cams, perhaps light falls of snow in the Mt Lofty Ranges, Mid-North and Flinders Ranges would be more widely reported now than they were in those days.

Sunday 11th June 1905: fall of snow at O.B. Flat "and other places".

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 1½

There were reports of a fall of snow at O.B. Flat (near Mt Gambier), and other unnamed places (probably also in the South-East), on Sunday 11th June, eg "For the last five days the weather has not only been very wet, but intensely cold, the winds being from the south-west and south. On Sunday and Monday ... there were showers of hail in Mount Gambier, and on Sunday a fall of snow occurred at O. B. Flat. Several thunderstorms also varied the proceedings." I didn't find any reports of snow elsewhere in South Australia on that date.

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Wednesday 14 June 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/84835350#pstart7720080

The article refers to a fall of snow at O.B. Flat near Mt Gambier on Sunday 11th June 1905.

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"Heavy Rains.— It has rained at Mount Gambier every day since May 24, three weeks, and the last of the three has been the most wintry week of all. The duration of the spell reminds old residents of the winters between 1860 and 1870. For the last five days the weather has not only been very wet, but intensely cold, the winds being from the south-west and south. On Sunday and Monday {this was presumably 11th and 12th June - Miles} there were showers of hail in Mount Gambier, and on Sunday a fall of snow occurred at O. B. Flat. Several thunderstorms also varied the proceedings. "

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84835350
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7720080
APA citation
The Border Watch, PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY MORNING. (1905, June 14). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved May 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84835350

**********************************************************

The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 15 June 1905 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56674724#pstart4423501

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"MOUNT GAMBIER, June 13.— ... The last five days have been extremely wet and cold. There have been rain, hail, and thunderstorms at the Mount, and the extra of snow at O.B. Flat and other places."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56674724
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4423501
APA citation
THE SEASON. (1905, June 15). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 3. Retrieved December 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56674724

**********************************************************

29th July 1905 snow reported around Mt Lofty and in Lower South-East.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 2½

On Saturday 29th July snow was reported around Mt Lofty and in the Lower South-East: "SNOW AT MOUNT LOFTY. Friday night in the Mount Lofty Ranges was exceedingly cold, biting showers of rain falling through the hours of darkness. At 7 o'clock on Saturday morning a fall of snow occurred, being described as "a good sprinkle, but not heavy." It lay on the ground for nearly half an hour, and at different times subsequently a few flakes filtered down from the heavens. Hail was mixed with the driving squalls of rain during the forenoon, which were separated by intervals of bright sunshine. The snow area extended for a considerable distance round Mount Lofty."

And what I'm confident but not certain was at Naracoorte: "Saturday was, we think, the coldest day we have experienced for some time. The wind blew from the south and south-west as if off an iceberg. Heavy boisterous showers of rain, hail, and sleet fell at frequent intervals during the day, and between 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning, and 12 and 1 o'clock noon, several of the residents state that they saw light falls of snow. Some say that it was sleet, but many vouch that light flakes of snow fell. The falls, however, were of short duration."

At Mt Gambier there were frequent hail showers and "Falls of snow occurred in some places, at Nelson, for instance, at 7 a.m." and "At some places in the town, in the open, during the frequent hail showers the temperature fell as low as 35° 36° and 37°, or 3 to 5 degrees above freezing point. There were showers every hour or so, and every shower was a hail fall. The highest temperature in the shade was 48.7°. Heaps of hailstones converted into masses of ice lay in every hollow or shade where they fe'l, and where the sun's rays could not reach them. Falls of snow occurred in some places, at Nelson, for instance, at 7 a.m. The hailstones froze in masses on the roads where they fell. The cause of the extreme coldness of the day was a strong south wind direct from the Antarctic icebergs."

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 31 July 1905 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4946689

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"SNOW AT MOUNT LOFTY.
Friday night in the Mount Lofty Ranges was exceedingly cold, biting showers of rain falling through the hours of darkness. At 7 o'clock on Saturday morning a fall of snow occurred, being described as "a good sprinkle, but not heavy." It lay on the ground for nearly half an hour, and at different times subsequently a few flakes filtered down from the heavens. Hail was mixed with the driving squalls of rain during the forenoon, which were separated by intervals of bright sunshine. The snow area extended for a considerable distance round Mount Lofty."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4946689
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page924791
APA citation
MISCELLANEOUS NEWS. (1905, July 31). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved December 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4946689

**********************************************************

The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954) Tuesday 1 August 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/147134412

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"The Weather.— Since Friday last we have experienced the coldest snap of weather during the winter. Not only has it been exceedingly cold, but it has been exceedingly
wet and boisterous. Saturday was, we think, the coldest day we have experienced
for some time. The wind blew from the south and south-west as if off an iceberg. Heavy boisterous showers of rain, hail, and sleet fell at frequent intervals during the day, and between 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning, and 12 and 1 o'clock noon, several of the residents state that they saw light falls of snow. Some say that it was sleet, but many vouch that light flakes of snow fell. The falls, however, were of short duration."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147134412
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17474836
APA citation
DISTRICT COUNCIL NEW ASSESSMENTS. (1905, August 1). The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article147134412

**********************************************************

Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954) Wednesday 2 August 1905 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/84836437

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"The Coldest Day. — Saturday was the coldest day we have experienced this season. The observations recorded at the telegraph office show that the temperature in the shade at 9 o'clock in the morning was 37.4°. What it was during the hail showers is not recorded. At some places in the town, in the open, during the frequent hail showers the temperature fell as low as 35° 36° and 37°, or 3 to 5 degrees above freezing point. There were showers every hour or so, and every shower was a hail fall. The highest temperature in the shade was 48.7°. Heaps of hailstones converted into masses of ice lay in every hollow or shade where they fe'l, and where the sun's rays could not reach them. Falls of snow occurred in some places, at Nelson, for instance, at 7 a.m. The hailstones froze in masses on the roads where they fell. The cause of the extreme coldness of the day was a strong south wind direct from the Antarctic icebergs."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84836437
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7720148
APA citation
The Border Watch, PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY MORNING. (1905, August 2). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved December 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84836437

**********************************************************

20-21st August 1905 snow reported from Clare and "the district", Mt Bryan, and Summertown.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 2

On Sunday 20th August light snow was reported from Clare and "the district". "CLARE. August 22.—A light fall of snow occurred here on Sunday at about noon. It was so light that it was almost invisible, and residents who anticipated having a good time snowballing were disappointed. Reports from all around the district state that the snow was fairly general, although little in quantity. Previous to the fall a heavy shower of hail passed over, and the cold was very biting."

Snow was also reported at Mt Bryan on the same day (likely refers to the town and not the mountain): " On Sunday about 1'40 p.m. snow fell and made it just a slight bit chilly."

In another article it refers to snow falling at Summertown: "SUMMERTOWN." "August 22.—There was a slight fall of snow here on Monday morning."

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 23 August 1905 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4953671

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"CLARE.
August 22.—A light fall of snow occurred here on Sunday at about noon. It was so light that it was almost invisible, and residents who anticipated having a good time snowballing were disappointed. Reports from all around the district state that the snow was fairly general, although little in quantity. Previous to the fall a heavy shower of hail passed over, and the cold was very biting. Heavy frosts have been experienced again this week."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4953671
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page924997
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1905, August 23). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved January 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4953671

**********************************************************

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 23 August 1905 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/37325676

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"Mt. Bryan.
August 21.
Oh, the glorious uncertainties of the weather, as during last week we experienced terrible frosts a pie-bald Friday, wind and snow, and to end up with parching sun." ...
" On Sunday about 1'40 p.m. snow fell and made it just a slight bit chilly."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37325676
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4756203
APA citation
Mt. Bryan. (1905, August 23). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved January 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37325676

**********************************************************

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 24 August 1905 Page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4954101

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

"SUMMERTOWN."
"August 22.—There was a slight fall of snow here on Monday morning."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4954101
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page925008
APA citation
THE COUNTRY. (1905, August 24). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved January 2, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4954101

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