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Forward in time to 1904 July 14th snowfall.

1904 Thursday June 30th - a substantial snowfall.

A substantial snowfall carpets part of the southern Lofties and some of the northern highlands in the Mid-North. Slight falls also reported from isolated locations on the preceding day Wednesday 29th June.

There were two other snowfalls in 1904 and I'll report on those on separate pages.

Brief summary.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 6 or 7

Now here are some snippets from the newspaper articles I've posted below I found on the Trove database, for those who don't wish to read the individual articles.

"The snow which fell on Thursday was spread over the country within a radius of a few miles from Mount Lofty. In places the snow banked up nearly a foot deep, but the fall registered about 2 in. on the average. The picturesque landscape was soon enveloped in a white mantle, and the effect was beautiful."
"The snow-sheet was spread from Mount Lofty to Norton's Summit, and some of those who were privileged to be in the district enjoyed a good game of snowballing."
"With the disturbance at the close of the month we had cold weather, Adelaide on the 28th (maximum 48 deg.) and 30th (maximum 49.3) having the two coldest days on record for the month of June, snow falling on the Mount Lofty Ranges and some of the northern highlands on the latter date."
"It was about breakfast time 'hat the flakes ... began to fall along the western slopes of the hills from Mount Lofty to Norton's Summit. In the aiternoon there was a slight fall as near to Adelaide as burnside."
""CLARE, July 1. ... {Friday 1st - Miles}
On Wednesday {29th June - Miles} there was a slight fall of snow at White Hut, and yesterday more fell." {White Hut is just north of Clare}
"Mount Bryan East ... A fall of snow, lasting about half an hour, took place. The mount and other prominent hills were clad with a mantle of white, which presented a beautiful sight. Excitement ran high. For a time work of all kinds was temporarily suspended, both young and old were absorbed by the novel sight."

Snow was reported from some unusually low-level locations eg Tanunda. I haven't seen any reports of a snow blanket in the Mid-North or central Lofties such as is described for the western side of the southern Lofties from Mt Lofty to Norton Summit. I don't recall seeing any reports from the Flinders Ranges or the South-East. At Petersburg (now named Peterborough)"at 3 p.m., and at 630 p.m., slight falls of snow occurred".

Below is the snow-relevant text on the snowfall I found in SA newspapers on the Trove database, using a variety of search words.

Important note: The descriptive term "snowstorm" is used in some of the articles and I think this is usually what we now refer to as "snow shower" or "snow flurry", and doesn't of itself imply any storminess about it eg it doesn't of itself imply any lightning or gale force winds.

First I should mention that you can track down the relevant "Sir Charles Todd weather folios for 1904" for this event from the index page http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/indexpage/1904.html .

The article below is the single most informative general commentary I found on the June 30th snowfall in the Adelaide Hills.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 1 July 1904 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4983724

{quoting only snow-relevant text - there's also text in this article on rainfalls and on the effects of gales and on flooding which I don't quote below}

WINTER IN EARNEST.
HEAVY RAIN AND FLOODS.
SNOW IN THE RANGES.

The maximum thermometer reading at the Adelaide Observatory on Thursday was only 49.3 deg. In the Mount Lofty Ranges it was below freezing point, and consequently the residents there were not surprised when snow began to fall during the morning. Heavy showers of rain preceded, and followed the downfall, which was heralded by peals of thunder.

Cold Days for Hills Residents.

"I have lived in the hills for many years," said one resident, ''and have never felt so cold as during this winter, and I was not surprised to see the snow." Another old resident stated that for many years light falls of snow had fallen over the ranges, but the fall on Thursday, he said, was heavier than usual, and he inclines to the belief that the winter climate around Mount Lofty is annually growing colder.

A Fallacy.

Sir Charles Todd, when approached last night, said the occurrence of snow was not an indication that the climate was becoming colder, but depended upon many things. Snow would occur when the temperature of the clouds was low and the rain began to fall in small drops, and the fine showers developed into snowflakes. The snow formed over the plains as well as the hills but in its descent over the lower levels it thawed to rain in the air. It was not an unusual occurrence for snow to fall in South Australia, and he had known the ground as far north as the Burra district to be covered with snow.

Sir Charles was asked whether there was any foundation for the belief that the climate was getting colder year by year in South Australia, and that these occasional snow-falls are indications of a decline to Arctic conditions. He replied in the negative. "This winter," he added, "is exceptionally cold, especially during the present month." It will be a source of comfort to those who suffer severely during the cold snaps to know that Sir Charles Todd reports that the temperature is now gradually rising, and that the wind and weather conditions will gradually improve duriug the next few days.

Two Inches of Snow.

The snow which fell on Thursday was spread over the country within a radius of a few miles from Mount Lofty. In places the snow banked up nearly a foot deep, but the fall registered about 2 in. on the average. The picturesque landscape was soon enveloped in a white mantle, and the effect was beautiful. The temperature was scarcely cold enough for the snow to produce the usual fantastic effects on the foliage of trees and large shrubs, but the smaller plant life was buried inches deep. Some charming effects were to be seen at the Mount Lofty residences of Sir. Langdon Bonython, Lady Milne, and Messrs. Bakeweil and Waterhouse. The gardens surrounding them were bedecked with fleecy whiteness.

Snowballing.

The snow-sheet was spread from Mount Lofty to Norton's Summit, and some of those who were privileged to be in the district enjoyed a good game of snowballing. Several youngsters who had apparently never seen snow before mistook piles of hailstones for it, and began throwing the heavy balls at each other. A hard whack with a lump of the ice satisfied one youngster that snowballing was "not the game it's cracked up to be." "It hurts me," he said plaintively. "I thought snow wouldn't hurt?" "Snowmen were built up in many places by both young and old, and the novelty of playing with the snow had not worn off when the thaw set in during the afternoon. By nightfall most of the snow had melted. The Chronicle photographer secured some magnificent views of the snow-clad landscape, and these will be published in the next issue.

When interviewed on Thursday the Assistant Government Astronomer said:—"The disturbance off our coastline has increased in energy since yesterday, especially during the night, and the barometer at Adelaide and Hobart reads three-tenths of an inch lower this morning than it did at the same hour yesterday morning. ... .

Aldgate, June 30.

... . During to-day we have had several nice falls of snow. ... .

SNOW IN THE NORTH.

The telegraph station-master at Yarcowie reported to Sir Charles Todd yesterday that a light snowstorm was experienced there during the afternoon.

Gumeracha, June 30.

... . The weather is extremely cold. There was a fall, of snow this morning, and it is cold enough for more.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4983724
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page920202
APA citation
WINTER IN EARNEST. (1904, July 1). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 5. Retrieved April 2, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4983724

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 2 July 1904 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4984015

{quoting a snippet referring to parts of SA where snow fell, and snippets relating to the moderating weather in SA and the system moving east}

"METEOROLOGICAL NOTES."

"Friday, July 1. Synopsis."
"South Australia. — Still unsettled, showery southern parts, but moderate, cloudy fine northern. Squally south-west winds and rough seas along south and south-east coast. Central and Northern Australia—Clear with calms and south-east winds."

"Rain Reports"
"Snow recorded over parts of north and Mount Lofty Ranges."

"General Remarks."
"The storm centre has moved quickly away to the eastward towards Gabo Island, and the weather here has greatly moderated, though still somewhat squally in the south- east. Over Bass Straits stormy conditions are reported this morning, ... ."

"CHARLES TODD, Government Astronomer."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4984015
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page920243
APA citation
METEOROLOGICAL NOTES. (1904, July 2). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved April 5, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4984015

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Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 23 July 1904 Page 40.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/163050795

{quoting snow-relevant text}

"JUNE WEATHER.
—Notes by Sir Charles Todd.—"
"... till the 28th, when a well-marked disturbance over the SoutbernOcean gave us cold, stormy weather and heavy and very general rains extending well inland." ...
"With the disturbance at the close of the month we had cold weather, Adelaide on the 28th (maximum 48 deg.) and 30th (maximum 49.3) having the two coldest days on record for the month of June, snow falling on the Mount Lofty Ranges and some of the northern highlands on the latter date."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163050795
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19017337
APA citation
JUNE WEATHER. (1904, July 23). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 40. Retrieved April 13, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163050795

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 1 July 1904 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55618952

This is a flowery and long on words and short on useful information article on the snowfall. I've reproduced some of the text below. It seems that this fall came down to an unusually low altitude on the western side of the Adelaide hills. The Trove image of the original is difficult to read in parts and some words are unreadable - that's why there are plenty of spelling errors below and some words are indecipherable.

A MANTLE OF WHITE.
SNOW ON THE RANGES.
A HEAVY FALL.

On Thursday the residents in the hills and in parts of the north saw an Australian landscape transformed to a typical English winter scene. It was a glorious sight, and one which will live long in the memory of those who witnessed it. ... on Thursday Adelaideans were awakenrd by a luavy hailstorm ...
—The Snow Falls.— The air was so keen and biting that one could not help thinking that the south pole was in close proximity. Wednesday was siiiiiciently frigid for even an Esquimaux, and on Thursday the snow really fell. It was soon known in the city tiiat snow was lulling in the hills, and towers and elevations were ascended with the object of get- tu'j? a view of the ranges in their mantle oi white. It was about breakfast time 'hat the flakes, as pure as JicMven, began to fall along the western slopes of the hills from Mount Lofty to Norton's Summit. In the aiternoon there was a slight fall as near to Ade- laide as burnside. The suenu i'rom tae tower of The Register Office was beautiful in the extreme, the fresh green lulls \x.uz I capped with snow. ...

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55618952
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4416679
APA citation
A MANTLE OF WHITE. (1904, July 1). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 5. Retrieved April 16, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55618952

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 2 July 1904 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55619058

{quoting only text referring to snow}

"CLARE, July 1. ... {Friday 1st - Miles}
On Wednesday {29th June - Miles} there was a slight fall of snow at White Hut, and yesterday more fell."
{White Hut is just north of Clare}
"TARCOWIE, July 1.—There was a slight fall of snow at 1 o'clock yesterday."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55619058
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4416686
APA citation
RECORD SCHOOL ATTENDANTS. (1904, July 2). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 4. Retrieved April 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55619058

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Wednesday 6 July 1904 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/36012731

{quoting snow-relevant text only}

BOOBOROWIE, July 1.
"Hail and snow were seen here on Thursday, and a good rainfall has also been recorded."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36012731
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4755781
APA citation
VOICED FROM OUR PEOPLE. (1904, July 6). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved April 4, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36012731

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 2 July 1904 Page 8.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4984085

"SNOW IN THE NORTH.
Mount Bryan East, June 30. {Thursday - Miles}
Snow has fallen, and the country presents a most magnificent picture. The snow on Mount Bryan must be a foot or two deep."

"FLOODS AT CLARENDON.
Clarendon, July 1. ... Snow fell at intervals during the day." {likely to be referring to June 30th in my opinion - Miles}

"Petersburg, July 1.
The rain that has come is most timely, and will do a wonderful amount of good. The temperature has been very low, and on Thursday {June 30th - Miles} at noon, at 3 p.m., and at 630 p.m., slight falls of snow occurred. The weather is still cold and threatening."

"Grunthal, June 30.
... To-day a fall of snow was witnessed, the first for three years."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4984085
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page920250
APA citation
GOOD RAINS IN THE NORTH. (1904, July 2). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved April 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4984085

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Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 9 July 1904 Page 12.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/163050304

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

"THE SEASON."

URAIDLA, June 30.—To-day a little snow fell. The weather is too cold for the growth of vegetables, especially the early sown.

HALLETT, June 30.—... . At about 2 o'clock to-day a fall of snow occurred, and snowballing was engaged in for nearly two hours.

TANUNDA, July 2.—During this week we have experienced wintry weather, and on Thursday we had rain, hail, snow, and storm at intervals.

PENWORTHAM, July 2.—Snow fell on Thursday afternoon, but rain after soon washed all traces

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163050304
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19017213
APA citation
THE SEASON. (1904, July 9). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 12. Retrieved April 2, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163050304

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The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 6 July 1904 Page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4985219

{quoting only text referring to snow}

"LOBETHAL, July 4.—Last week was one of the wettest and most disagreeable weeks experienced here for years, culminating in heavy floods on Thursday {30th June - Miles}. Hail, wind, rain, and snow was the order of things on that day, and some of the farmers along the creek were swamped out."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4985219
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page920346
APA citation
THE PRODUCER. (1904, July 6). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved April 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4985219

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The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 6 July 1904 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55616565

{quoting only text referring to snow}

"MYLOR, July 4. ... On Wednesday {29th June - Miles} and Thursday {30th June - Miles} slight snowstorms were witnessed. The thermometer dropped to below 40 deg.."
"TANUNDA, July 2.— During this week we have experienced wintry weather, and on Thursday we had rain, hail, snow, and storm at intervals. ..."
"PENWORTHAM, July 2.—Snow fell on Thursday afternoon, but rain after soon washed all trace ..."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55616565
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4416718
APA citation
THE SEASON. (1904, July 6). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 6. Retrieved April 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article55616565

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 8 July 1904 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/108330508

{quoting entire article}

SNOW AT MT. BRYAN.
SNOWCLAD HILLS AND SNOW-BALLING.

Mount Bryan, July 4.
During the last week we have been visited by a splendid fall of rain, which was so badly needed. The fall was of a steady nature, so that the ground had the full benefit of it. The gauge at the Mt. Bryan Post-office recorded for the week ending July 2 106 points, while at Mr A Gebhardt's, Macerode, 116 were registered. The fall comprised of rain, hail, and snow. On Thursday afternoon we had two snow showers, which made Mount Bryan white for several hours. Snowballing was indulged in, and in one instance, where a large lump was gathered, it lasted until Saturday. Mount Hallett also bore a white appearance for an hour or so, but a misty shower soon thawed it. Some of the sheep-farmers became anxious at the re-appearance of snow. The fall about 2 years ago, which was of a much heavier nature, had a very bad effect on the stock, it having covered all vegetation from 9 p.m on Saturday until noon on Sunday. This, together with the intense cold, gave the young lambs rather a severe time.

Mount Bryan East, July 4
A favorable turn in the weather look place during the past week on Tuesday morning, 28th inst. During the afternoon 25 points fell. Rain continued at intervals until Thursday afternoon, when the high winds that prevailed brought rain, hail, and snow with it. A fall of snow, lasting about half an hour, took place. The mount and other prominent hills were clad with a mantle of white, which presented a beautiful sight. Excitement ran high. For a time work of all kinds was temporarily suspended, both young and old were absorbed by the novel sight. The youngsters, who had never witnessed the like before, were tasting it; others were rolling it in lumps, and were not particular who they hit with it, while the older folk enjoyed the fun immensely. One hundred and two points were registered for the week, which will benefit the country, generally, very much.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108330508
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10566150
APA citation
SNOW AT MT. BRYAN. (1904, July 8). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 5. Retrieved March 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108330508

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 15 July 1904 Page 8.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/108330566

{quoting only snow-relevant text from longer article, which also includes some observations on Hallett and the surrounding district, as it was at the time the article was written}

I've been unable to find any reference to a date for this snowfall. I'm very confident it refers to June 30th when snow was reported from Hallett: "HALLETT, June 30.—... . At about 2 o'clock to-day a fall of snow occurred, and snowballing was engaged in for nearly two hours". It could possibly refer to July 14th when there were a few reports of snow falling in the Mid-North but I found none from Hallett. It's also quite a good match for the amount of snow described as falling on the other side of the Mt Bryan Range at Mt Bryan East on June 30th: "Mount Bryan East ... A fall of snow, lasting about half an hour, took place. The mount and other prominent hills were clad with a mantle of white, which presented a beautiful sight. Excitement ran high. For a time work of all kinds was temporarily suspended, both young and old were absorbed by the novel sight."

"A Snowstorm
Soon after my arrival at Hallett, the residents were treated to a snowstorm, and as each succeeding flake of snow fell, the complexion of the landscape was altered, and the spectacle presented of sugar gums and other trees and houses, glistening in their damped but natural colors over a floor of pearly whiteness surmounted by fences, and other woodwork transformed seemingly, into masses of swansdown, whilst to the east the Mount Bryan Ranges, lent a background of additional beauty as the snowing ceased, and the sun shone out over fields of glittering whiteness, contrasting with the foliage of the gum trees. The Snowstorm was not of sufficient duration to make a lengthened effect, and the transformation of the landscape to normal was soon accomplished by the wind and sun."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108330566
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10566161
APA citation
AROUND THE COUNTRY. (1904, July 15). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 8. Retrieved April 11, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108330566

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The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser Friday 8 July 1904 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/146303039

"THE SOUTHERN DISTRICTS.
OUR WEEKLY NEWS-BUDGET."

"The novel sight of snow several inches thick was seen on the Mount Lofty Ranges on June 30, and snowballing was the order."

"Bridgewater, July 6.
We have been experiencing some very cold and wintry weather, and on June 30 a good
fall of snow occurred. The flakes disappeared almost immediately they reached the earth, excepting in a few sheltered places, where they could be gathered up in han llul- fit for snowballing, a pastime at which most colonials would soon become adepts with more frequint practice."

"Mount Pleasant, July 5.
Hail, rain, and snow have been received here since Wednesday night, whci it begin to rain heavily and continued for three days."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146303039
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page17353726
APA citation
THE SOUTHERN DISTRICTS. (1904, July 8). The Mount Barker Courier and Onkaparinga and Gumeracha Advertiser (SA : 1880 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved April 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146303039

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 15 July 1904 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/108330628

{quoting only the snow-relevant text from the article}

TANUNDA.
July 6.
FLOODED CREEKS.
"During the last week we have experienced wintry weather, and on Thursday we had
rain, hail, snow, and storm at intervals."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108330628
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10566158
APA citation
TANUNDA. (1904, July 15). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 5. Retrieved April 3, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108330628

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I think Clarice meant Thursday 30th when she says "... on Friday we had a lot of snow ..."

Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 23 July 1904 Page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/163051001

{quoting only the snow-relevant text from the article}

Mount Torrens, July 3.
Dear Uncle Harry—Thank you for your kind birthday wishes. I am sending you 1/6 (6d. each) from Stanley, Mary Hicks, and myself, for the Cots' Fund. It is our holidays next week, and I am going away for a few days. We have no Circle here now, because we have no Leader, but if we had we would have a lot of "Sunbeams." We have been having very cold weather lately, and on Friday we had a lot of snow, but it did not stay long, because the ground was too wet. I go to school yet, and am only in the fifth class. I don't know any more knews now, so I will close with love to Aunt Sophie, the Cousins, and yourself from us all.—I remain, your loving Niece,
CLARICE PARSONS.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163051001
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page19017304
APA citation
"SUNBEAM" LOVING LETTER LEAGUE. (1904, July 23). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 7. Retrieved April 4, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article163051001

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