Back to home page

Forward to next events "1902: only two minor occurrences found ... ."

October 27th Sunday: snow reported from three Mid-North locations following a very intense low passing south of SA.

Rating on SA-wide 'snow distribution and amount' scale (min 1 to max 10) : 2

I found one minor snow event for October 1901 in the Trove SA newspaper database, where snow was reported on October 27th from Hallett, Petersburg and Terowie.

Below: no Todd folio weather chart was produced on snow-day Sunday 27th October but here is a detail of the 9am Monday 28th chart.



Below are reports of snow from Hallett, Petersburg (now Peterborough) and Terowie, and a report from Port Pirie of an extremely high tide. Hail was reported much more widely in southern SA, along with very welcome and substantial rain. There were gales, and I saw in a couple of locations a report of winds described as "hurricane" strength. There were also dust storms reported in the north, and some damage along the Adelaide coastline. A few reports mentioned thunder or thunderstorms. The low reponsible for the severe weather continued on to Tasmania, and you can read some reports of the resulting severe weather in the eastern states including dust storms, thunderstorms, lightning strikes causing damage, gales and some snow, and doubtless other dramas, on the "Todd Weather Folios 1879-1909" website starting here http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/19011026.html.

Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 2 November 1901 Page 11.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/161766846/18983215

{quoting reports of snow at Hallett and Petersburg and a report of an extremely high tide from Port Pirie, from a very much longer article}

HIGH TIDE AT PORT PIRIE.

PORT PIRIE, October 28.
An abnormally high tide during the night has caused another overflow of the Ellendale embankment. Houses in the vicinity are surrounded with water, and much inconvenience and a considerable amount of damage must necessarily follow. The repair of this embankment or the adoption of other means to stop the flood waters has exercised the minds of councillors and residents in the locality for some time, but beyond temporary repairs nothing has been done. On the present occasion the tide has risen to 27 ft on the bar, which is about the highest recorded, and the same height as when Ellendale was flooded on a former occasion.

HALLETT, October 28.—Glorious rain has again fallen. Commencing on Saturday night it continued showery all yesterday, hail being frequent with occasional snow, at the same time the wind blew with about hurricane force, but no further damage than the bending of a large iron telegraph pole has been reported. By 9 a.m. to-day an inch had been registered, which has been added to by heavy showcra this morning. ...

PETERSBURG, October 28.—Steady ram has fallen, and about an inch has been recorded since Saturday. Yesterday afternoon one shower was ac companied by hail and snow. ...

{end of quotes}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161766846
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18983215
APA citation
HIGH TIDE AT PORT PIRIE. (1901, November 2). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 11. Retrieved February 12, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161766846

********************************************************

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 1 November 1901 Page 9.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4890846

{quoting only a report of snow from Terowie from a longer article}

Terowie, October 29. We have had another beautiful fall of rain which will do a great deal of good. Sunday night was very rough and boisterous, quite a hurricane blowing, and in the early part of the evening there was a light fall of snow and several hailstorms.

{end of quote}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4890846
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page903906
APA citation
THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS. (1901, November 1). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 9. Retrieved February 12, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4890846

*********************************************************

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 28 October 1901 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4905362

{quoting the most relevant part of a longer article}

A FINE RAIN.
"... In Adelaide the total fall up to 9 o'clock on Sunday evening was 68 points. When Sir Charles Todd was spoken to shortly after that time he said:—"During the last few days of last week we have been following the progress of a cyclonic disturbance which struck the coast of Australia north of Perth on Wednesday morning. On Thursday it was south of the Bight, and on Friday it was to the south of Robe, where the barometer fell six-tenths of an inch. On Saturday the disturbance was traced to Tasmania. On that day we had unsettled, squally weather, extending all the way to the Leeuwin, so that we expected squally, showery weather to-day. The barometer this morning was 29.47, and it is now 29.61 and rising rapidly. On Monday morning we shall have a continuance of strong south-west winds and squally weather.""

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4905362
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page903739
APA citation
A FINE RAIN. (1901, October 28). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 4. Retrieved February 12, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4905362

*******************************************************

Here are quotes from two more newspaper articles. The first of them repeats some of Charles Todd's comments above, but includes additional comments.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 29 October 1901 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/56510663

{quoting substantial parts of the article}

SQUALLY, STORMY WEATHER.
FINE RAINS.
The season although late has been exceedingly favourable. Sunday, notwithstanding the fact that it was October 27, was a cold, wild winter's day. To say the least of it that is extraordinary weather, as towards the end of October South Australians are generally sweltering beneath burning sun instead of shivering with blasts of cold. Rain fell at intervals throughout Sunday. A heavy hailstorm swept over Adelaide about 2 o'clock in the afternoon and the pavements, gutters, and roofs of houses were whitened as if by snow. There was a magnificent fall of rain in the middle and lower north, aggregating in many instances an inch. It was so cold during the day that people had to light fires in their houses. The wind blew with terrific force at times, and umbrellas were of little use in the storm. When seen at 9 o'clock on Sunday evening the Government Meteorologist, Sir Charles Todd, said:— 'During the last few days of the week we have been following the progress of a cyclonic disturbance which struck the coast of Australia north of Perth on Wednesday morning. On Thursday it was south of the Bight, and on Friday it was south of Robe, where the barometer fell six-tenths of an inch. On Saturday the dis- turbance was traced to Tasmania. On that day we had unsettled, squally weather, ex- tending all the way to the Leeuwin. So that we expected squally, showery wcather to-day. The barometer at 9 o'clock this morning, uncorrected, was 29.47, and at 6 o'clock this evening it was 29.61. The rainfall at Adelaide since Saturday morning up to 9 o'clock this evening was 0.68. We had little or no rain on the advancing side of the storm, but a good fall on the retreating side of it. The weather along the coast to the westward is rough and squally, with strong winds in the south-west and south-south-west, with showers. We shall have a rapidly rising barometer with some showers during the night, but the weather will gradually improve later." Our shipping reporter wrote on Sunday night:— "Throughout Saturday night and Sunday the wildest weather prevailed in the gulf. After midnight on Saturday the wind came in fierce squalls, first from the westward, with rain, increasing to a hard blow, which was felt pretty severely on shore. At 2 o'clock in the afternoon a very heavy hailstorm swept over the Semaphore, the ground being whitened as though a fall of snow had occurred, and the frozen pellets were piled up against the weather side of fences, walls, and buildings to the depth of several inches. The wind got more south later on, but was still blowing fresh."

"Farina— Fierce squalls from south-west; terribl- duststorms all day; now fine; no rain."
"Beltana— Terrible duststorms all day, only fev drops rain; now fine but cloudy."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56510663
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4461674
APA citation
SQUALLY, STORMY WEATHER. (1901, October 28). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 4. Retrieved February 13, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article56510663

*******************************************************

The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 29 October 1901 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/4888081

{quoting the entire article}

THE STORM IN THE GULF.
The boisterous weather which has prevailed at Glenelg since Saturday evening reached its worst in the early hours of Monday morning, when the tide was abnormally high, the seas dashing along the jetty from end to end, causing considerable damage to the structure, the decking being burst up in many places and the gas service ruptured. The members of the sailing club have been somewhat unfortunate, all their craft, with one exception, being swamped on the moorings. A scow belonging to Mr. C. Fenner was washed under the jetty and smashed up. Mr. P. Farrelly, the manager of the swimming baths, reports about £50 worth of damage, stagings and steps being swept away, and afterwards recovered on the beach beyond the Patawalonga. The fence surrounding the baths remains intact, and the necessary repairs will be proceeded with at once. At Hastings the fence along the esplanade has been carried away in many places and banks destroyed. At Brighton the fishing boats, which were drawn up on the beach beyond the usual high watermark, were overturned and the gear strewn along the shore for miles. Mr. Angus's three-tonner Love Not, which slipped her moorings a fortnight ago during a heavy blow, and had a severe shake up, was washed through the jetty, and receiver fur- ther damage. The sandhills along the beach have the appearance of a wall owing to the inroads of the sea. At Largs Bay the wind blew in angry gusts, accompanied by pene- tracing, driving showers right through Sunday night. The gulf was in a turmoil, and the vigorous sea was only beaten down to good behaviour by the showers and a volley of hail. The shipping, however, rode out the gale without damage, but the water at the Semaphore baths reached the floors of the caretaker's quarters, and they had to be temporarily abandoned.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4888081
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page903772
APA citation
THE STORM IN THE GULF. (1901, October 29). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 4. Retrieved February 13, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4888081

**********************************************************

Here's another report from Sir Charles Todd who was the Government Meteorologist in South Australia at the time, which gives more information about the evolution and path of the ferocious low referred to in my two posts above.

Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 16 November 1901 Page 11.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/161767798

METEOROLOGICAL NOTES FOR OCTOBER.
By Sir Charles Todd.
—Fine Agricultural Rains.—

{Quoting only the parts relevant for my purposes from a longer article. Sir Charles Todd was the Government Meteorologist in South Australia at the time and so the weather described here eg the rains refers to weather in South Australia}.

"Three marked disturbances are shown on the weather charts {in October 1901}, passing Adelaide on the 6th, 11th, and 26th." ... "The third and last disturbance was a very interesting development. It first appeared on the weather chart as a slight monsoonal "low" to the north of Perth on the morning of the 23rd. By next morning it had moved in a south-easterly direction to the Bight, near Eyre's Sandpatch, where it formed a closed cyclone (barometer 29.43). Pursuing the same south-easterly course next morning (25th) it had reached Robe on our south-east coast (barometer 29.38), and on the 26th was off the south end of Tasmania (barometer 29.2). Although the barometers here fell considerably no rain or rough weather marked the passage of the centre.

"During the 26th and 27th, however, the disturbance off Tasmania began to increase in energy, being evidently reinforced by low-pressure waves sweeping up from the Southern Ocean, and by Monday morning (28th) had developed into one of the most intense cyclonic whirls ever noted in these latitudes, the barometer at Hobart falling to 28.5 in., a record for over 50 years. Wild, tempestuous weather, with heavy rains and hailstorms, marked the storm, the whole of the state receiving a grand fall of rain, with fierce squalls of hail and a little snow. The storm quickly passed away and lost energy, the lowest barometer in southern New Zealand as it passed the Bluff being an inch higher than the Hobart minimum."

{end of quote}

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161767798
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18983315
APA citation
METEOROLOGICAL NOTES FOR OCTOBER. (1901, November 16). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 11. Retrieved February 15, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161767798

End of report.

Back to Top

*

*

*****