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1880 July 16th-17th: substantial snowfall Mid-North and Flinders Ranges, no reports found of snow in southern Lofties.

I've not been able to determine the causes of this snowfall either from the newspaper reports or from the Charles Todd folios covering the period of this event. The snow fell overnight June 16th and on the morning of 17th. Several locations reported hail showers and several locations reported strong winds without saying from which direction they blew.

This was not an exhaustive search of Trove and further searching may turn up reports of snow at locations not mentioned here.

I was unable to find any reports of snow in the southern Mount Lofty Ranges. Perhaps there was some light snow on the highest ground during the night but nobody saw it and it had melted by dawn, or maybe it simply didn't fall there.

As mentioned above the reported snow fell overnight June 16th and on the morning of 17th and the addresses of the Todd folios for those two days are http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/18800716.html and http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/web/18800717.html  (click on the images to proceed to the hi-resolution images in each case).

Below is a copy of a table from the Todd folio for 17th July 1880. It includes the wind direction at 9am reported at several South Australian locations. They include Streaky Bay south-westerly at 34 mph, Robe easterly at 8mph, Adelaide easterly at 8 mph, Kapunda variable at 13mph, and Port Augusta westerly at 13mph. These wind directions suggest to me that a complex weather situation may have prevailed over southern South Australia while snow was falling in the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges. Perhaps in the future a detailed study of all sources might elucidate this further.

There's no actual weather map drawn on the Todd folio for either day, and the following day 18th was a Sunday where no weather information was provided in the folio. The address of the folio where this table appears ie Saturday 17th is http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1880/18800717t01_hi-res.jpg .

Overall the snowfall was not as widespread as the fall a year previously on the 23rd July 1879, but nevertheless it was still substantial for the Flinders Ranges and Mid-North and locally it may have been more substantial than the 1879 fall.

I was expecting to see some references to the 1879 snowfall only one year previously almost to the day, but only one article I saw mentions the 1879 fall and none compare this 1880 fall with the 1879 fall. 

Now, here is a summary of what I found in a search of Trove relating to the event, so readers won't need to wade through many articles and their associated links. Below the summary is Appendix 1 which is a more detailed compilation of what I found, and you can safely ignore Appendix 1 unless you're investigating this snow event in detail or want to look up a specific report. 

Unless otherwise stated all text below from newspaper articles is quoted from Trove after being corrected. Mostly I've corrected on Trove and quoted only the snow-relevant text from each published article.


Wirrabara, July 17.
Heavy rain set in yesterday afternoon, and continued until midday to-day. Over an inch of rain has fallen. Snow also fell during the night and this morning. The hilltops are still covered. The weather is bitterly cold, and rain still threatens.

Caltowie, July 17.
We have had splendid rains, which will give the crops a good start, and the weather is very cold. The ranges round Mount Lock and the Hogshead are covered with snow, and look beautifully white from the township.

Wilmington, July 17.
We have had about an inch of rain since yesterday, and a steady soaking rain is still falling. Mount Brown and the prominent peaks of the Flinders Range are capped with snow. It is very cold.

Mannanarie, July 17.
Yesterday we had a break in the weather, since which we have had good soaking rains lasting for eight hours. This morning we have had a small fall of snow.

Melrose, July 17.
Over an inch of rain fell since yesterday, and Mount Remarkable and the Flinders Range for many miles are covered with snow from the summit to the foot, and present a grand appearance. This is the heaviest fall of snow that has been experienced for the last twenty years.

Port Augusta, July 18.
The weather yesterday was intensely cold, and snow fell in the Flinders Range.

HALLETT, July 17. Snow commenced falling about 12 o'clock last night, and is now visible on the hills. There is no sign of the weather breaking up. It is now raining.

JAMESTOWN, July 17. The rain still continues, and the weather is very threatening. Snow fell this morning early. It is now to be seen on Mount Lock.

PORT PIRIE, July 17. Over an inch of rain has fallen, and it is still raining steadily. Snow is plainly visible on the Flinders Range.

MORCHARD (via Yarrowie), July 17. A very heavy snowstorm commenced here this morning at about 7 o'clock, and continued without intermission until 12 o'clock. In some places the snow is laying six inches in depth on the ground.

MELROSE, July 17. Mount Remarkable is covered with snow. We are enjoying a splendid rain, which was much needed.

BLINMAN, JuIy 16. On Saturday evening, at 7 o'clock, snow commenced to fall, and lasted for an hour. It covered the ground and roofs for fully half an inch. The younger members of the community enjoyed a really hearty unorganised game of snowballing.

YARROWIE, July 17. It snowed here from 6 a.m. to-day until 12 noon. The Pekina Plains and Tarcowie ranges and the eastern slope of the Flinders range are covered with snow. Travellers from Pekina and Tarcowie state that the trees and wire fences are hung with icicles, and that snow is lying deep between the ranges.

Snow on the Flinders Range. The more northerly slopes of the Flinders Range were partially covered with snow on the morning of Saturday, the 17th instant, about five miles north of Wirrabara, the country to a large extent being clothed with a complete white muffle. The residents of this locality (says the Anas Express) were out busy making large snowballs. As a novelty, those who had never before witnessed the earth so covered were enraptured with the beautiful purity of the scene. The snow was visible all the day on Mount Remarkable and the higher ridges of the range. The weather was so intensely cold with snow fallen taat a horse, being ridden by a man named Parkes, refused to proceed along the road midway between Yarrowie and Gladstone, and the cold had so affected the man that he was perfectly powerless, and unable to manage the animal. The horse finding himself master of the situation, at once made tracks homeward, where Parkes had to be lifted from the saddle, to the seat of which he thought himself frozen. He suffered so much from the cold that he had to be taken to bed.

"PORT PIRIE. [From our own Correspondents.] July 19, 1880.
On Thursday evening rain began to fall, and on Saturday we had a regular downpour. The weather was very cold, and the Flidder's Range, immediately behind Port Pirie, was snow-capped. The snow was discernible all day Saturday. Residents here declare that it is the first snow they have seen.

APPILA. [From our own Correspondent.] July 17.
It commenced to rain again this morning about the break of day, and continued until noon, when it cleared up. Altogether there was nearly an inch which is I believe the best we have had since April. During the time there was a fall of snow, which was very light here, but when the clouds cleared away the Mannanarie and Pekina hills were covered.

BLACK ROCK PLAIN. [From our own Correspondent.] July 20.
About half-past seven on Saturday morning snow began to fall on the ranges on both sides of the plain, and about noon they presented a grand spectacle being all covered with snow. Only a few flakes fell on the plain.

BOOLEROO, July 19.
Nice showers fell during Friday night, and on Satur- day morning splendid rain fell intermixed with snow. When the clouds cleared away the adjacent hills were seen to be covered with snow, and it was distinct.y visible lying in the ridges on Mount Remarkable to day.

TARCOWIE, July 19.
On Thursday last the much-needed fain fell, and cont nued until Friday evening. This was succeeded by a heavy fall of snow which lasted for upwards of six hours, and the youngsters of our township were jubilant in having a real game of snowballing. The surrounding hills presented a pretty and novel appearance, being quite white.

WILMINGTON, July 20.
We have had a fall of snow again this year in the ranges, and it is somewhat remarkable that it is within three days of the time of the same occurrence last year.

YATINA, July 19.
On Thursday afternoon, July 15, the much-required rain came. A good shower set in, and again on Friday night it rained heavily at times. On Saturday we experienced a heavy fall of snow, the surrounding hills being covered.

YARCOWIE (Pekina Extension), July 20.
... we are being favoured with the long-looked-for rain, which commenced on Friday afternoon last, and it has rained ever since. This morning the Pekina and the Flinders Ranges were covered with snow.

ORROROO, July 19.
Something so unusual for our young colonials was the fall of snow here on Thursday night that several buggies were driven to the hills close at the back of the town, and came back loaded, whereupon the boys indulged in a good game of snowballing.

BLINMAN, July 19.
Winter has set in with a vengeance. Yesterday Blinman was visited by over one inch of rain, which was preceded on the previous day by a fall of snow. Men and boys could not resist the temptation so seldom given them of snowballing each other.

WIRRABARA, July 20.
During the past week or so we have had some splendid rains: about an inch and a half fell on Friday and Saturday last. We had also a heavy fall of snow, the hills being covered nearly all day on Saturday. It was a spectacle to look upon with astonishment and delight by many who beheld it for the first time The weather is still very cold and very severe frosts have occurred since Sunday.

Farrell's Flat July 23.
Heavy showers of rain fell last night, and the greater part of to-day were accompanied by a strong wind. The weather is extremely cold, and snow is said to have fallen this morning in different parts of the district.

Wilmington, July 23. The weather is cold and wet and stormy.

Hallett, July 23. Rain, hail, and snow are falling in abundance. The air is piercingly cold.

Auburn, July 23. Heavy rains fell last night, accompanied with severe hail, and continued the whole of to-day with but few intervals. The weather is bitterly cold.

BLINMAN. [From our own Correspondent.] July 19, 1880.
Rain has made Its appearance in this wilderness again, one inch having fallen since
Friday evening ... On Saturday evening about 7 o'clock a shower of snow came on to the great delight of the young Australians, who for the first time beheld real snow. Several young men went up to the smelting works, got on the roof and swept the snow together, making one very large ball and several smaller one, these afterwards were turned to firing material. There was no snow at Beltana; the fall seems to have been in a direct line north, and not very wide. About quarter of an inch was the depth of snow here.

COOMOOROO, July 22.
... by the splendid rains and snow which fell on Friday and Saturday last. We had some very heavy showers on Friday evening, and were under the impression that it had been raining all through the night, and were astonished to find on Saturday morning that it had been snow instead of rain. The fall of snow was so heavy that all the hills were capped with it, some of the higher ones being completely covered. It continued raining and snowing at intervals nearly the whole of Saturday. Over three quarters of an inch of rain fell, which will greatly benefit the crops. Since the rain the nights have been intensely cold, and we have had some of the most severe frosts ever remembered here.

BURRA, July 23. COUNTRY TELEGRAMS. [From our Country Correspondents.]
Steady showers have been falling all day, ... We also had a slight fall of snow in the morning.

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APPENDIX 1: DETAILS OF 1880 July 16th-17th SNOW REPORTS.

The preceding summary is quoted from these newspaper articles below. You can safely ignore everything in this Appendix 1 unless you're investigating this snow event in detail or want to look up a specific report.   

South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Monday 19 July 1880 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43145846

{Quoting the whole article to give a feel for the weather and the substantial rainfall recordings during July 16th and 17th. I've bolded the word snow wherever it appears in this article.}

THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS.

Crystal Brook, July 17.
A heavy rain set in yesterday afternoon, and continued till evening. Then it ceased for several hours, and the clouds, which had been gathering in the interval, broke about 2 o'clock this morning with a steady rain, which still continues, and there is every appearance of a heavy downpour. This is the most welcome rain we have had this season, as the early-sown crops were beginning to assume a withered appearance
Wirrabara, July 17.
Heavy rain set in yesterday afternoon, and continued until midday to-day. Over an inch of rain has fallen. Snow also fell during the night and this morning. The hilltops are still covered. The weather is bitterly cold, and rain still threatens.
Caltowie, July 17.
We have had splendid rains, which will give the crops a good start, and the weather is very cold. The ranges round Mount Lock and the Hogshead are covered with snow, and look beautifully white from the township.
Mongolata, July 17.
Nice rain fell last night, and it is still raining, with every appearance of continuance.
Truro, July 16.
Heavy rain fell here this afternoon, and it is still raining. It will do good, as the ground was beginning to get dry, and will help the late-sown crops.
Mallala, July 17.
It was raining nearly all day yesterday, the rainfall registered at Mallala being 0400.
Wilmington, July 17.
We have had about an inch of rain since yesterday, and a steady soaking rain is still falling. Mount Brown and the prominent peaks of the Flinders Range are capped with snow. It is very cold.
Redhill, July 17.
We have at last had a glorious downpour of rain. An inch has been registered since yesterday. The rain still continues to fall.
Telowie, July 17.
A glorious rain has been falling since 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Nearly one inch has been registered. The prospects of the crop are splendid. It is expected that the creek will be running before the evening.
Mannanarie, July 17.
Yesterday we had a break in the weather, since which we have had good soaking rains lasting for eight hours. This morning we have had a small fall of snow.
Melrose, July 17.
Over an inch of rain fell since yesterday, and Mount Remarkable and the Flinders Range for many miles are covered with snow from the summit to the foot, and present a grand appearance. This is the heaviest fall of snow that has been experienced for the last twenty years.
Yarcowie, July 17.
A splendid rain set in last evening. The gauge registered 0 390 this morning. It is still raining.
Blinman, July 17.
Half an inch of rain fell here yesterday. It is still raining heavily.
Port Pirie, July 17.
There has been a very heavy fall of rain during the night, and it is still coming down steadily, with every appearance of continuing. It will do a vast amount of good.
Maitland, July 17.
Very heavy rains fell here last night and early his morning.
Quorn, July 17.
No rain having fallen since June 24 the country was beginning to look dry, and farmers were becoming very anxious. Yesterday a decided change occurred, and rain commenced in the afternoon, continuing pretty steadily till this afternoon. A good quantity has fallen, and it is still raining. There is every appearance of a continuance, except under the hills. The crops in the surrounding hundreds are backward, but are healthy, the constant heavy dews having sustained them. Feed is scarce, but in a week after these rains the country will be wonderfully altered.
Port Augusta, July 18.
Glorious rains commenced falling on Friday evening, and continued during the greater part of yesterday. The northern and eastern areas have participated in the downpour, and the agriculturists are reassured. The weather yesterday was intensely cold, and snow fell in the Flinders Range. To-day the weather is fine and warm.
Port Pirie, July 18.
We are having splendid rains, which have just come in time to save the crops, more especially the late sown. The farmers are in high spirits.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43145846
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4009377
APA citation
THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS. (1880, July 19). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved November 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43145846

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Monday 19 July 1880 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/30804264

{Quoting only snow-relevant text. I've bolded the word snow wherever it appears in this article.}

COUNTRY TELEGRAMS.
[From our own Correspondents.]
HALLETT, July 17. Snow commenced falling about 12 o'clock last night, and is now visible on the hills. There is no sign of the weather breaking up. It is now raining.

JAMESTOWN, July 17. The rain still continues, and the weather is very threatening. Snow fell this morning early. It is now to be seen on Mount Lock.

PORT PIRIE, July 17. Over an inch of rain has fallen, and it is still raining steadily. Snow is plainly visible on the Flinders Range.
MORCHARD (via Yarrowie), July 17. A very heavy snowstorm commenced here this morning at about 7 o'clock, and continued without intermission until 12 o'clock. In some places the snow is laying six inches in depth on the ground. The farmers are all rejoicing.
MELROSE, July 17. Mount Remarkable is covered with snow. We are enjoying a splendid rain, which was much needed.
BLINMAN, JuIy 16. One inch of rain has fallen since Friday evening. The weather is now dry, cloudy, and cold. On Saturday evening, at 7 o'clock, snow commenced to fall, and lasted for an hour. It covered the ground and roofs for fully half an inch. The younger members of the community enjoyed a really hearty unorganised game of snowballing. Business is still dull.
YARROWIE, July 17. It snowed here from 6 a.m. to-day until 12 noon. The Pekina Plains and Tarcowie ranges and the eastern slope of the Flinders range are covered with snow. Travellers from Pekina and Tarcowie state that the trees and wire fences are hung with icicles, and that snow is lying deep between the ranges.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30804264
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2295368
APA citation
COUNTRY TELEGRAMS. (1880, July 19). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 5. Retrieved November 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30804264

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South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Friday 23 July 1880 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43153181

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

Snow on the Flinders Range.— The more northerly slopes of the Flinders Range were partially covered with snow on the morning of Saturday, the 17th instant, about five miles north of Wirrabara, the country to a large extent being clothed with a complete white muffle. The residents of this locality (says the Anas Express) were out busy making large snowballs. As a novelty, those who had never before witnessed the earth so covered were enraptured with the beautiful purity of the scene. The snow was visible all the day on Mount Remarkable and the higher ridges of the range. The weather was so intensely cold with snow fallen taat a horse, being ridden by a man named Parkes, refused to proceed along the road midway between Yarrowie and Gladstone, and the cold had so affected the man that he was perfectly powerless, and unable to manage the animal. The horse finding himself master of the situation, at once made tracks homeward, where Parkes had to be lifted from the saddle, to the seat of which he thought himself frozen. He suffered so much from the cold that he had to be taken to bed.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43153181
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4009406
APA citation
THE EXPLORATION OF PALESTINE. (1880, July 23). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43153181

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 23 July 1880 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106564758

"PORT PIRIE.
[From our own Correspondents.]
July 19, 1880.
The fine weather has at last broken up. The farmers are once more jubilant, although many declare that their crops are partially nipped. On Thursday evening rain began to fall, and on Saturday we had a regular downpour. The weather was very cold, and the Flidder's Range, immediately behind Port Pirie, was snow-capped. The snow was discernible all day Saturday. Residents here declare that it is the first snow they have seen.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106564758
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574473
APA citation
PORT PIRIE. (1880, July 23). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved November 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106564758

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 23 July 1880 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97284140

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

APPILA.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 17.
Since my last we have had a long continuance of dry weather, with occasional heavy frosts, which tended to retard the growth of the crops. Yesterday, however, we had a change for rain, and in the afternoon it came down pretty heavy, clearing up again at night. It commenced to rain again this morning about the break of day, and continued until noon, when it cleared up. Altogether there was nearly an inch which is I believe the best we have had since April. During the time there was a fall of snow, which was very light here, but when the clouds cleared away the Mannanarie and Pekina hills were covered.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97284140
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658796
APA citation
APPILA. (1880, July 23). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97284140

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 23 July 1880 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/97284142

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

BLACK ROCK PLAIN.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 20.
On last Friday afternoon we were favored with a change of weather, a good shower of rain falling. We had a few light showers during the night until about 6 o'clock on Saturday morning, when it set in constant until noon. About half-past seven on Saturday morning snow began to fall on the ranges on both sides of the plain, and about noon they presented a grand spectacle being all covered with snow. Only a few flakes fell on the plain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97284142
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658796
APA citation
BLACK ROCK PLAIN. (1880, July 23). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article97284142

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Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 24 July 1880 Page 11.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/160134803/18909612

{quoting only snow-relevant text and a reference to wallabies and an explosion}

COUNTRY NEWS.
COUNTRY LETTERS. [Correspondents are particularly requested to send their letters in time to reach us on Wednesday evening.]

"BOOLEROO, July 19.
... on Thursday a favourable change came on with light rains, and at noon on Friday the gauge showed 0.115 point'. Nice showers fell during Friday night, and on Satur- day morning splendid rain fell intermixed with snow. When the clouds cleared away the adjacent hills were seen to be covered with snow, and it was distinct.y visible lying in the ridges on Mount Remarkable to day.

TARCOWIE, July 19.
On Thursday last the much-needed fain fell, and cont nued until Friday evening. This was succeeded by a heavy fall of snow which lasted for upwards of six hours, and the youngsters of our township were jubilant in having a real game of snowballing. The surrounding hills presented a pretty and novel appearance, being quite white.

WILMINGTON, July 20.
We have had a fall of snow again this year in the ranges, and it is somewhat remarkable that it is within three days of the time of the same occurrence last year.

YATINA, July 19.
On Thursday afternoon, July 15, the much-required rain came. A good shower set in, and again on Friday night it rained heavily at times. On Saturday we experienced a heavy fall of snow, the surrounding hills being covered.

YARCOWIE (Pekina Extension), July 20.
... we are being favoured with the long-looked-for rain, which commenced on Friday afternoon last, and it has rained ever since. This morning the Pekina and the Flinders Ranges were covered with snow.

ORROROO, July 19.
Something so unusual for our young colonials was the fall of snow here on Thursday night that several buggies were driven to the hills close at the back of the town, and came back loaded, whereupon the boys indulged in a good game of snowballing.

ARNO BAY (Western District), July 15.
Wallabies are a source of great trouble and vexa tion to us, as we have to build high thick fences to protect our cropB from the devouring legions which favour us with their noctural visits.

BLINMAN, July 19.
Winter has set in with a vengeance. Yesterday Blinman was visited by over one inch of rain, which was preceded on the previous day by a fall of snow. Men and boys could not resist the temptation so seldom given them of snowballing each other.

PENOLA, July 19
The excitement consequent on the gunpowder accident which happened on Sunday night has some what cooled down, as there is every hope that the eyes of none of the men are seriously injured. They are terribly burnt about the face and neck, and will probably be disfigured from the effects of the powder for life. The escape from sudden death of the two men that were blown up appears to be miraculous, for if the powder had been loose Instead of in tins nothing could possibly have saved them.

WIRRABARA, July 20.
During the past week or so we have had some splendid rains: about an inch and a half fell on Friday and Saturday last. We had also a heavy fall of snow, the hills being covered nearly all day on Saturday. It was a spectacle to look upon with astonishment and delight by many who beheld it for the first time The weather is still very cold and very severe frosts have occurred since Sunday.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160134803
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18909612
APA citation
COUNTRY NEWS. COUNTRY LETTERS. (1880, July 24). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 11. Retrieved December 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160134803

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South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Saturday 24 July 1880 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43148427

{quoting only snow-relevant text}

THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS.
Farrell's Flat July 23.
Heavy showers of rain fell last night, and the greater part of to-day were accompanied by a strong wind. The weather is extremely cold, and snow is said to have fallen this morning in different parts of the district.
Wilmington, July 23. The weather is cold and wet and stormy.
Hallett, July 23. Rain, hail, and snow are falling in abundance. The air is piercingly cold.
Auburn, July 23. Heavy rains fell last night, accompanied with severe hail, and continued the whole of to-day with but few intervals. The weather is bitterly cold.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43148427
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4009032
APA citation
THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS. (1880, July 24). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved December 2, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43148427

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Tuesday 27 July 1880 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106564799

"BLINMAN.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 19, 1880.
Rain has made Its appearance in this wilderness again, one inch having fallen since
Friday evening ... On Saturday evening about 7 o'clock a shower of snow came on to the great delight of the young Australians, who for the first time beheld real snow. Several young men went up to the smelting works, got on the roof and swept the snow together, making one very large ball and several smaller one, these afterwards were turned to firing material. There was no snow at Beltana; the fall seems to have been in a direct line north, and not very wide. About quarter of an inch was the depth of snow here."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106564799
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574477
APA citation
BLINMAN. (1880, July 27). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved November 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106564799

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Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 31 July 1880 Page 12.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/160135029

"COOMOOROO, July 22.
The farmers were complaining bitterly of the prospect, and fears were entertained that next season's yield would be a very poor one. But all doubts and fears were set at rest, at least for a time, by the splendid rains and snow which fell on Friday and Saturday last. We had some very heavy showers on Friday evening, and were under the impression that it had been raining all through the night, and were astonished to find on Saturday morning that it had been snow instead of rain. The fall of snow was so heavy that all the hills were capped with it, some of the higher ones being completely covered. It continued raining and snowing at intervals nearly the whole of Saturday. Over three quarters of an inch of rain fell, which will greatly benefit the crops. Since the rain the nights have been intensely cold, and we have had some of the most severe frosts ever remembered here.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160135029
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18909653
APA citation
COUNTRY NEWS. COUNTRY LETTERS. (1880, July 31). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 12. Retrieved November 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160135029

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End of page "1880 July 16th-17th ...".

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