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1879: widespread snowfall during overnight darkness Wednesday 23rd into Thursday 24th July 1879.

July 23-24 1879 : extensive overnight snowfall, heaviest in Mid-North and Flinders Ranges, also reports from southern Mount Lofty Ranges. Rare wind direction for SA snow - from south-east to east. Another rare feature was that snow on a few of the highest northern range tops persisted for days.

This snowfall stands out from most other falls I've investigated, firstly for the wind direction which when mentioned was variously reported as south-easterly or easterly, and secondly for the local persistence of the snow-cover. The persistence was topped by this extraordinary claim: "Mount Bryan West, August 13. Snow fell here on the evening and night of the 23rd ult., four feet deep in places, which remained on the ranges over fourteen clear days". There was a much lighter fall on August 4th which may have contributed.

Another rather tantalising reference, this time to the wind on the night before the night of the fall, is this report: "EDEOWIE, July 28.  On Tuesday night, 22nd instant, one of the most furious gusts of wind within the memory of the oldest inhabitants passed over Edeowie, carrying with it havoc, devastation, and the stable of the Edeowie Hotel, while gigantic limbs of eucalypti lie prostrate strewed around the bed of the creek for some distance." 

I don't recall another snow event I've reported on so far (15th November 2015), where the wind has been reported as coming from south-east or east.

Summary

Here is a summary of what I found in a search of Trove and also the Charles Todd weather reports relating to the event, so readers won't need to wade through numerous articles and their associated sources. Below the summary is Appendix 1 which is a detailed compilation of what I found and you can safely ignore Appendix 1 unless you're investigating this snow event in detail or want to look up a specific report.

Unless otherwise stated all text below from newspaper articles is quoted from Trove after being corrected. Mostly I've corrected on Trove and quoted only the snow-relevant text from each published article.

Southern Mount Lofty Ranges

I was only able to find a handful of reports of snow in the southern Mount Lofty Ranges. Perhaps most smaller towns in the hills were not yet connected to Adelaide telegraphically, or perhaps it was mostly a Mid-North - Flinders Ranges fall. I'm inclined to think based on the few reports I did find, that snow probably fell widely in the southern Mt Lofty Ranges, but not as widely ore heavily as it has in some of the biggest southern Mount Lofty Ranges falls in our recorded history. Whereas on the high ground of the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges it appears to have been considerably heavier and may have been in the top ten Mid-North - Flinders Ranges falls.

Here are the Charles Todd weather maps for 23rd and 24th July 1879. They are sourced from "Todd Weather Folios 1879-1909" on the website http://charlestodd.net. "Charles Todd and his meteorological staff maintained daily weather folios for 32 years, between 1879-1909.  ... The folios represent a detailed contemporary view of weather of the day as determined by South Australia's weather professionals, and as detailed mainly in the press of the day" {quote from charlestodd.net}. So this was their first year.

The direct links to these two images and associated text are:

http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1879/18790723t01_hi-res.jpg

http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1879/18790724t01_hi-res.jpg

They report that Alice Springs received four and a half inches of rain in the 48 hours to 9am on the 23rd. This may be another indication besides the south-east to easterly wind direction that this was quite an unusual snow-producing weather system.


Now, elsewhere in the newspapers:

"There was a heavy fall of snow on the Mount Lofty Range early on Thursday morning. Mr. Percival, of Summertown, states that in the neighbourhood of that township the ground was covered with snow, which in some places lay at least a foot deep. The roofs of the houses and all vegetables were white with it, reminding old people of the appearance of houses and trees in England durmg the winter season, and which in this sunny climate they had almost forgotten. Our Stirling East correspondent, writing on July 24, says :—Mount Lofty presented a most wintry appearance this morning, mantled with snow. The trees, shrubs and flowers looked quite natural to the Englishborn Australians, but were an astonishment to the young gumsuckers. The snow is falling fast while I am writing.""

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"The winter has been remarkably cold. Although there has been no snow in Adelaide abundance has fallen in the hills within a few miles, trees and house roofs being as white as in the old country. In various parts of the north the fall was much heavier. During a very severe night three men lost themselves in a snow storm; one perished and the other two were discovered in an insensible condition. This was quite an unexampled occurrence in South Australia."

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"Latest News.
FALL OF SNOW.—This morning Mr. Thompson, driver of the Mount Barker coach, brought to Adelaide a genuine snowball, measuring four teen inches in diameter, which had been made at Crafers, where there had been a heavy fall of snow. Mr. Thompson informs us that the snow was lying quite four inches deep on the Mount Barker-road. The ball, which was first of all brought to this office and afterwards shown in Mr. Eyens' shop, King William-street, attracted considerable notice, got only from colonials, to whom the sight was a novel one, but from people who had lived in the old-country, and who were thus forcibly reminded of days long past, when with healthy frames and eager spirits they engaged in the winter pastime of snowballing. Our telegrams intimate that in several directions in the North there have been heavy falls of snow. At Summertown we are informed the snow at places was fully a foot thick, and the hills near the Montacute are quite white with the fall."

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"Mr. WEST-ERSKINE, M.P., said that others had been coming up with the deputation, but he believed had been prevented by the weather, as eight miles of the road from Crafer's towards Hahndorf was covered with snow."

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{The wording below suggests that snow was not seen falling in Meadows on 23rd-24th July 1879 nor seen on the ground. Or if it was it didn't come to the attention of the newspaper's correspondent(s) in Meadows. - Miles}

Meadows, July 28
"The weather has been extremely cold of late, and although we have not e--n favoured with a snow storm, ice has not been denied us. and severe frosts have been neither few nor far between ... "

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Mid-North and Flinders Ranges

I found many articles reporting snow at one or more locations in the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges regions. Most of the relevant text is in the summary below.

James Butler aged 18 perished outdoors during the snowfall near Jamestown on the night of 23rd July 1879. I don't know but he may have the distinction of being the first and perhaps the only person in South Australia since colonisation of dying of exposure outdoors during a snowfall. Two companions survived albeit very drunk and apparently asleep when James Butler aged 18 moved away from their horse-drawn conveyance and died. The subsequent inquest decided death had resulted from cold and exposure. Some questions will remain forever unanswered. There's a newspaper account of the events and the subsequent inquest on a separate page here "James Butler aged 18 perishes outdoors in South Australian snowfall near Jamestown in 1879." and I've copied the newspaper account of the events and the subsequent inquest at the bottom of the page you're now reading here James Butler.

Now to the summary.

Jamestown, July 23.  To-day was intensely cold, and to-night heavy rain has set in from the south-east.
[Later Telegram.]
Heavy snow is falling, mixed with sleet and rain.

Jamestown, July 24.  The hills are sheeted with snow this morning over half an inch of rain has been registered.

JAMESTOWN, July 24.  The weather is very cold, with rain. Snow fell last night. Mount Lock and the surrounding hills are thickly covered.

TARCOWIE. July 29.  The weather for the last few weeks has been very cold and wet. On Wednesday last about sundown it commenced to snow, and at 10 o'clock the snow was on the ground in the township 2 inches thick; on the Hogshead and Manannarrie Ranges, I am informed, it averaged 18 inches.

Appila Yarrowie, July 24.  A heavy snowstorm visited the Tarcowie Ranges last night, which was plainly visible from Appila Yarrowie at 12 o'clock to-day. The weather has been severely cold all to-day and yesterday, with a cutting wind blowing and to-day there have been heavy showers of rain.

Terowie, July 24.  A heavy fall of snow took place last night here, completely covering the country. In some places it was six inches deep.

TEROWIE, July 24.  Last night we had a heavy fall of snow. The whole of yesterday was bitterly cold, with a keen south-east wind. At about 8 o'clock it commenced snowing, and kept up till about 10. The snow was about a foot in depth against the exposed sides of houses. This morning the hills to the west were covered in snow, which, with the dark streaks caused by the ridges of stone, present a beautiful sight.

Farrell's Flat, July 24.  We had a heavy fall of snow last night. A hill, the property of Mr. Patrick Dowd, J .P., is covered this morning. Such a sight has never been seen here before by the oldest residents.

FARRELL'S FLAT.  Since my last we have been visited with a good fall of snow, and for the first time snowballing was carried on here in the streets. The fall was heavy here but it must have been a great deal heavier further up the line, as trucks on the goods train from Hallett were partly covered with the white visitor. As a matter of course the weather was intensely cold with a sharp frost, and very little change has taken place in the atmosphere since. The crops and grass continue to look as well as can reasonably be expected considering the cold weather we have experienced lately.

WILMINGTON, July 24.  We have had twenty hours' continuous heavy rain. The highest parts of the Flinders Range are covered with snow. Mount Brown presents a very fine appearance.

LAURA, July 29.  Next to the rops comes the weather, which has been extremely cold. We did not have a fall of snow in the township, but the tops of the hills only a few miles away were quite white with it. The sight of the snow on the Mannanarie hills, fully twenty miles distant, greatly pleased those who saw it, many never having, seen snow-covered hills before. Commercial gentlemen arriving from further north profess to have had strange experiences in the snow, the relation of which tested our credulity to the utmost. We are now having fine days, but the mornings and nights are still very cold.

LAURA, July 24.  The weather is bitterly cold, and snow was distinctly visible this morning on the Wirrabara and Mannanarie Ranges. The latter range is distant about twenty miles from Laura. Steady soaking showers fell last night.

CALTOWIE, July 24.  Half an inch of rain has fallen since last night. The weather is bitterly cold. Mount Lock and the adjoining ranges are covered with snow.

CLARE, July 24.  A considerable quantity of rain fell last night. Yesterday was the coldest day this winter. There was a heavy fall of snow about 11 o'clock last night, lasting two hours.

BLINMAN, July 24.  Splendid rains have fallen since Tuesday night. The total quantity is over half an inch. High winds prevailed till last night, carrying away the back verandah of the Post-Office, also damaging other verandahs and roofs.

BURRA, July 23, 10.15 p.m. The weather to-day was the coldest known by the oldest resident. Rain commenced this afternoon, and is steadily continuing. Snow commenced falling at about 9 o'clock this evening, and still continues. Large quantities have fallen up to the present time.

HALLETT, July 23.  The weather has been bitterly cold all day, and snow is now falling fast.

Hallett, July 24.  There was a very heavy fall of snow here last night, and the hills are still white.

The Weather and the Crops in the Areas.—Mr. James Shakes (of Messrs. Liston, Shakes, & Co.), who has recently returned from a trip to the North, has kindly furnished us with the following interesting particulors:—" ... On Wednesday at Quorn it rained from about half-past 10 in the morning to daylight next morning, and by the appearance of the country there must have been nearly an inch, and as it came from the south-east and east the plains would be sure to participate in the welcome downfall on Thursday morning. Whilst on the way by tram from Quorn to Port Augusta a pleasing sight presented itself. Mount Brown and the Mount Arden Ranges were beautifully capped with snow, causing at Port Augusta and the neighbourhood quite a sensation, the experience of the settlers in regard to colonial snow having been of a rather disagreeable nature, requiring to be washed off with water and occasionally down with sundry half-pints of XXX or other exhilarating beverage. On the road back and when on the range near Canowie, Mount Bryan and the Razorback presented a sight which to a colonial like myself will be long remembered, the whole being covered with snow several feet in thickness. The weather the whole distance from Kapunda to Quorn and Port Augusta was intensely cold."

A correspondent at the Burra, writing on July 24, says:—"On Monday last the wind changed round from the west, from which quarter it had been hlowing for a long time, to the east, and on Wednesday the cold became intense. Almost everyone remarked that it was cold enough for snow, and big coats and wrappers were freely used all day. Several old hands declared that they would rather have hot winds. At about 7 p.m. the storm increased, with a few drops of rain, but it soon began to snow, and for more than three hours there was a driving snowstorm, which it was almost impossible to face; in some places where the snow beat against walls, roofs, and fences it became a hard solid mass. This morning the hills were capped with the pure white snow, and being such a novelty it naturally created excitement amongst those who have never been in the old country. I met with a man who had to face the storm for a mile, and he said that although he had lived in England twenty winters he never felt the cold so severe before. He could only go a few yards without turning his back to the weather. He felt it cutting his eyes, ears, and face to such an extent that he had to cover his face and feel his way along by the fence; when he reached home he had flakes of ice on his coat and hat. The weather has greatly moderated."

EDEOWIE, July 28.  On Tuesday night, 22nd instant, one of the most furious gusts of wind within the memory of the oldest inhabitants passed over Edeowie, carrying with it havoc, devastation, and the stable of the Edeowie Hotel, while gigantic limbs of eucalypti lie prostrate strewed around the bed of the creek for some distance.

PEKINA, July 29.  We had a fine fall of snow here on Wednesday last, some of it laying on the ground till Sunday.

Melrose, July 24.  Heavy rain fell yesterday. Mount Remarkable has been capped with snow all the morning.

MELROSE, July 30.  Last week we had two days snow in the Mount, and the weather was very cold. Since then we are having genial seasonable weather.

Melrose, July 25.  The Flinders Range presented a beautiful appearance yesterday. The tops were covered with snow for 30 miles from south of Mount Remarkable to north of Mount Brown. At noon to-day snow was still on the summit of Mount Remarkable.

Mintaro Snowstorm.— A beautiful sight was to be witnessed from Mintaro on Thursday morning, July 24. The Flagstaff Hill, near Black Springs, being covered with snow to the depth of several inches.

"YATINA. July 23.  We have had extremely cold weather for the last ten days with a very drying wind from the north- west. To-day we had a good fall of rain, sleet, and snow. ...

MOUNT BRYAN WEST, AUGUST 13.
Snow fell here on the evening and night of
the 23rd ult., four feet deep in places, which
remained on the ranges over fourteen clear
days. In Banbury ward, hundreds of gums,
peppermints, and sheeoaks had a quantity of
limbs and branches broken down with snow
and are now to be seen. On the morning
of the 24th ult, icicles from 10 to 14 inches long
were suspended at the bottom of every
hollow of the iron that covered our kitchen in
which we had a large fire all night and the heat
must have melted the snow on the roof during
the night, other places covered with iron had
no ice on them. The ground was covered
with snow here at 9pm on the 4th inst., and
was covered again at 5p.m., on the 6th.

MOUNT BRYAN FLAT. July 31.  The weather has been much warmer during the last few days. Yesterday and today have been like spring. The warmth has improved the appearance of the wheat and grass, although they are very backward. There are still a few patches of snow on the Range, but it has shrunk a good deal during the past two days. It looks strange to see snow on the hills and feel the weather quite warm.

MOUNT BRYAN EAST, June 28. [This was published on Friday 1 August so June 28 should be July 28 - Miles]
Since my last we have had some splendd weather, though at times very cold and frosty and there has been a splendid fall of rain and snow. The snow began to fall about 7 o'clock on Wednesday evening, and lasted for more than five hours; the ground was covered three or four inches deep, the hills were covered for thirty-six hours afterwards, and there is snow on Mount Bryan Range at the present time. There has not been such a f.ll up here for something like eighteen years as there was last Wednesday night.

BLACK SPRINGS, July 28. [a Monday - Miles]
On Monday [this is most likely a mistake by the writer and it should be Wednesday - Miles], at about half-past 7 o'clock, it commenced to snow heavily, and lasted for several hours. Some of the snow remained on the hilltops for several days. It was the heaviest fall of snow that has taken place for many years in this part. The weather is now fine, but very frosty.

LAUNCELOT, July 28. [a Monday - Miles]
We experienced a heavy fall of snow on Wednesday night [Wed 23rd July - Miles], and on the following morning the ground was covered two inches in depth.

BLACK ROCK PLAIN. July 28. During the early part of last week the weather was extremely cold, which resulted on Wednesday night in a heavy fall of rain and snow. On Thursday morning the surrounding hills presented a grand spectacle in their white robes, strongly reminding a person of the old country.

APPILA. July 25. A public meeting was held at Appila-Yarrowie on July 23 to discuss the working of the present Land Act. ... The meeting was a thoroughly representative one, notwithstanding the severity of the weather. It rained steadily during the evening, with a strong easterly wind, which was almost unbearably cold; but notwithstanding this drawback many persons came from a long distance, showing thereby the lively interest which was taken in the proceedings.
On Thursday morning a grand sight was visible from this place. The Mannanarie ranges were covered with snow, and it did not entirely disappear until this evening.

RIVERTON July 28, 1879.  Things are as dull as ever here. Every one complains of the cold, and not without reason, as on Wednesday last [23rd - Miles] we had a fall of snow at Macaw Creek, about three miles south of Riverton.

YACKA. July 28.  In common with other parts of the colony we have had a continuance of wet and cold weather, but the snow storms that visited different places in the North did not reach this township. I am told by old residents that they never experienced such cold weather before in Australia.

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End of Summary

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APPENDIX 1: DETAILS OF 1879 JULY 23-24 SNOW REPORTS.

Below are details of the reports I found from an extensive but by no means complete search of the newpapers on the Trove database and also some information gathered from the Charles Todd folios. Mostly I've corrected on Trove and quoted below, only the snow-relevant text from each published article.

Most of the information below is summarised above so you can safely ignore this detailed report unless you're doing an investigation of this snow event or you want to check out something specific.

Firstly here are the Charles Todd weather maps for 23rd and 24th July 1879. The snow fell overnight 23rd-24th. They are sourced from "Todd Weather Folios 1879-1909" on the website http://charlestodd.net. "Charles Todd and his meteorological staff maintained daily weather folios for 32 years, between 1879-1909.  ... The folios represent a detailed contemporary view of weather of the day as determined by South Australia's weather professionals, and as detailed mainly in the press of the day" {quote from charlestodd.net}.

The direct links to these two images and associated text are:

http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1879/18790723t01_hi-res.jpg

http://charlestodd.net/Todd_Folios/1879/18790724t01_hi-res.jpg

They report Alice Springs received four and a half inches of rain in the 48 hours to 9am on the 23rd. This may be another indicaton besides the wind blowing from the south-east to east that it was quite an unusual weather system.


Now for the snow-relevant text I found on the Trove database.  

Southern Mount Lofty Ranges.

I was only able to find a handful of reports of snow in the southern Mount Lofty Ranges. Perhaps most smaller towns in the hills were not yet connected to Adelaide telegraphically, or perhaps it was mostly a Mid-North-Flinders Ranges fall. Light snow may not have been seen in the wee small hours and may have melted pretty quickly on the ground. 

I'm inclined to think based on the few reports I did find, that snow probably fell widely in the southern Mt Lofty Ranges, but not nearly as widely as it has in the biggest southern Mount Lofty Ranges falls in our recorded history. Whereas on the high ground of the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges it appears to have been considerably heavier and may have been in the top ten Mid-North - Flinders Ranges falls.

The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373313

There was a heavy fall of snow on the Mount Lofty Range early on Thursday morning. Mr. Percival, of Summertown, states that in the neighbourhood of that township the ground was covered with snow, which in some places lay at least a foot deep. The roofs of the houses and all vegetables were white with it, reminding old people of the appearance of houses and trees in England durmg the winter season, and which in this sunny climate they had almost forgotten. Our Stirling East correspondent, writing on July 24, says :—Mount Lofty presented a most wintry appearance this morning, mantled with snow. The trees, shrubs and flowers looked quite natural to the Englishborn Australians, but were an astonishment to the young gumsuckers. The snow is falling fast while I am writing.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373313
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293172
APA citation
The Advertiser. FRIDAY, JULY 25,1879. (1879, July 25). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373313

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Saturday 9 August 1879 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373744

The winter has been remarkably cold. Although there has been no snow in Adelaide abundance has fallen in the hills within a few miles, trees and house roofs being as white as in the old country. In various parts of the north the fall was much heavier. During a very severe night three men lost themselves in a snow storm; one perished and the other two were discovered in an insensible condition. This was quite an unexampled occurrence in South Australia.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373744
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293284
APA citation
The Advertiser SATURDAY, AUGUST 9, 1879. (1879, August 9). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373744

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Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Thursday 24 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197728211

Latest News.
FALL OF SNOW.—This morning Mr. Thompson, driver of the Mount Barker coach, brought to Adelaide a genuine snowball, measuring four teen inches in diameter, which had been made at Crafers, where there had been a heavy fall of snow. Mr. Thompson informs us that the snow was lying quite four inches deep on the Mount Barker-road. The ball, which was first of all brought to this office and afterwards shown in Mr. Eyens' shop, King William-street, attracted considerable notice, got only from colonials, to whom the sight was a novel one, but from people who had lived in the old-country, and who were thus forcibly reminded of days long past, when with healthy frames and eager spirits they engaged in the winter pastime of snowballing. Our telegrams intimate that in several directions in the North there have been heavy falls of snow. At Summertown we are informed the snow at places was fully a foot thick, and the hills near the Montacute are quite white with the fall.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728211
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22392575
APA citation
Latest News. (1879, July 24). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728211

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Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Thursday 24 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197728230

Mr. WEST-ERSKINE, M.P., said that others had been coming up with the deputation, but he believed had been prevented by the weather, as eight miles of the road from Crafer's towards Hahndorf was covered with snow.

The article doesn't say when the road was covered with snow - Miles.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728230
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22392575
APA citation
DEPUTATION. (1879, July 24). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728230 

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{The wording below suggests that snow was not seen falling in Meadows on 23rd-24th July 1879 nor seen on the ground. Or if it was it didn't come to the attention of the newspaper's correspondent(s) in Meadows.}

Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954) Thursday 7 August 1879 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/96890847

Country Intelligence.
(From own our Correspondents.)
Meadows, July 28
The weather has been extremely cold of late, and although we have not e--n favoured with a snow storm, ice has not been denied us. and severe frosts have been neither few nor far between ...

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96890847
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9483286
APA citation
Country Intelligence. (1879, August 7). Southern Argus (Port Elliot, SA : 1866 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96890847

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Mid-North and Flinders Ranges.

I found many articles reporting snow at one or more locations in the Mid-North and Flinders Ranges regions. Extracts from the first few newspaper articles below contain telegrams from multiple towns, so there is considerable duplication as some telegrams were sent to more than one newspaper or newspapers reprinted other newspapers' telegrams or reports.

I've embolded the names of the towns the telegrams originated from. Most, but not all, of these embolded towns reported snow in the towns or-and in nearby hills or ranges.

So here are the articles I found on Trove that reported snow in the Mid-North and-or the Flinders Ranges, but note that the search was not a complete one.

South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43098871

WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY.

Gladstone, July 24.
Fine seasonable rains fell in our district las night. The gauge shows a fall of 0.280 in. The crops are looking exceedingly well notwithstanding the bitterly cold and frosty weather we have experienced.
Jamestown, July 24. The hills are sheeted with snow this morning over half an inch of rain has been registered.
Appila Yarrowie, July 24. A heavy snowstorm visited the Tarcowie Ranges last night, which was plainly visible from Appila Yarrowie at 12 o'clock to-day. The weather has been severely cold all to-day and yesterday, with a cutting wind blowing and to-day there have been heavy showers of rain.

Quorn, July 24. We have had 24 hours' splendid soaking rain, and the sky is still overcast, giving promise of more wet.
Hallett, July 24. There was a very heavy fall of snow here last night, and the hills are still white.
Terowie, July 24. A heavy fall of snow took place last night here, completely covering the country. In some places it was six inches deep.
Melrose, July 24. Heavy rain fell yesterday.
Mount Remarkable has been capped with snow all the morning.
Farrell's Flat, July 24. We had a heavy fall of snow last night. A hill, the property of Mr. Patrick Dowd, J .P., is covered this morning. Such a sight has never been seen here before by the oldest residents.
Wilmington, July 24. The whole of Mount Brown and one or two other eminences on the Flinders Range are covered with snow. We have had a splendid fall of rain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43098871
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3997559
APA citation
WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY. (1879, July 25). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved October 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43098871

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Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/160122932

WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY.
Jamestown, July 23.
To-day was intensely cold, and to-night heavy rain has set in from the south-east.
[Later Telegram.]  Heavy snow is falling, mixed with sleet and rain.
Jamestown, July 24.
The hills are sheeted with snow this morning over half an inch of rain has been registered.
Appila Yarrowie, July 24.
A heavy snowstorm visited the Tarcowie Banges last night, which was plainly visible from Appila Yarrowie at 12 o'clock to-day. The weather has been severely cold all to-day and yesterday, with a cutting wind blowing, and to-day there have been heavy showers of rain.
Hallett, July 24.
There was a very heavy fall of snow here last night, and the hills are still white.
Terowie, July 24.
A heavy fall of snow took place last night here, completely covering the country. In some places it was six inches deep.
Melrose, July 24.
Heavy rain fell yesterday. Mount Remarkable has been capped with snow all the morning.
Farrell's Flat, July 24.
We had a heavy fall of snow last night. A hill, the properly of Mr. Patrick Dowd, J.P., is covered this morning. Such a sight has never been seen here before by the oldest residents.
Wilmington, July 24.
The whole of Mount Brown and one or two other eminences on the Flinders Range are covered with snow. We have had a splendid fall of rain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160122932
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18907918
APA citation
WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY. (1879, July 26). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 4. Retrieved November 1, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160122932

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 21.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93967370

LOCAL TELEGRAMS.

GLADSTONE, July 24. The weather keeps very cold. Some nice showers of rain fell through the night, and the weather is still unsettled.
JAMESTOWN, July 24. The weather is very cold, with rain. Snow fell last night. Mount Lock and the surrounding hills are thickly covered.
WILMINGTON, July 24. We have had twenty hours' continuous heavy rain. The highest parts of the Flinders Range are covered with snow. Mount Brown presents a very fine appearance.
LAURA, July 24. The weather is bitterly cold, and snow was distinctly visible this morning on the Wirrabara and Mannanarie Ranges. The latter range is distant about twenty miles from Laura. Steady soaking showers fell last night. The crops all around are looking splendid.
CALTOWIE, July 24. Half an inch of rain has fallen since last night. The weather is bitterly cold. Mount Lock and the adjoining ranges are covered with snow.
FARRELL'S FLAT, July 24. Last night we were visited with a heavy fall of snow. A hill on Mr. P. Dowd's estate is covered. The weather is severely cold.
CLARE, July 24. A considerable quantity of rain fell last night. Yesterday was the coldest day this winter. There was a heavy fall of snow about 11 o'clock last night, lasting two hours.
BLINMAN, July24.  Splendid rains have fallen since Tuesday night. The total quantity is over half an inch. High winds prevailed till last night, carrying away the back verandah of the Post-Office, also damaging other verandahs and roofs.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967370
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429384
APA citation
LOCAL TELEGRAMS. (1879, July 26). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 21. Retrieved October 19, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967370

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Friday 25 July 1879 p 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373295

LOCAL TELEGRAMS.

FARRELL'S FLAT July 24.
Last night we were visited with a heavy fall of snow. A hill on Mr. P. Dowd's estate is covered. The weather is severely cold.
CLARE, July 24. A considerable quantity of rain fell last night. Yesterday was the coldest day this winter. There was a heavy fall of snow about 11 o'clock last night, lasting two hours.
JAMESTOWN, July 24. The weather is very cold, with rain. Snow fell last night. Mount Lock and the surrounding hills are thickly covered.
WILMINGTON, July 24. We have had twenty hours' continuous heavy rain. The highest parts of the Flinders Range are covered with snow. Mount Brown presents a very fine appearance.
LAURA, July 24. The weather is bitterly cold, and snow was distinctly visible this morning on the Wirrabara and Mannanarie Ranges. The latter range is distant about twenty miles from Laura.
CALTOWIE, July 24. Half an inch of rain has fallen since last night. The weather is bitterly cold. Mount Lock and the adjoining ranges are covered with snow.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373295
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293173
APA citation
LOCAL TELEGRAMS. (1879, July 25). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 6. Retrieved October 19, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373295

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Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Thursday 24 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197728228

PROVINCIAL TELEGRAMS.
THE WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY.
Gladstone, July 24.
Fine seasonable rains fell in our district last night. The gauge shows a fall of 0f 280 in. The crops are looking exceedingly well notwithstanding the bitterly cold and frosty weather we have experienced.
Farrell's Flat, July 24.
We had a heavy fall of snow last night. A hill, the property of Mr. Patrick Dowd, J. P., is covered this morning. Such a sight has never been seen here before by the oldest residents.
Wilmington, July 24.
The whole of Mount Brown and one or two other eminences on the Flinders Range are covered with snow. We have had a splendid fall of rain.
Jamestown, July 24. The hills are sheeted with snow this morning; over half an inch of rain has been registered.
Quorn, July 24.
We have had 4 hours' splendid soaking rain, and the sky is still overcast, giving promise of more wet.
Melrose, July 24. Heavy rain fell yesterday.
Mount Remarkable has been capped with snow all the morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728228
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22392575
APA citation
PROVINCIAL TELEGRAMS. (1879, July 24). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728228

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 2 August 1879 Page 22. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93968867

TARCOWIE, July 29. The weather for the last few weeks has been very cold and wet. On Wednesday last about sundown it commenced to snow, and at 10 o'clock the snow was on the ground in the township 2 inches thick; on the Hogshead and Manannarrie Ranges, I am informed, it averaged 18 inches.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93968867
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429413
APA citation
TARCOWIE, JULY 29. (1879, August 2). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 22. Retrieved November 12, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93968867

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 7.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93967257

LOCAL TELEGRAMS.
BURRA, July 23, 10.15 p.m. The weather to-day was the coldest known by the oldest resident. Rain commenced this afternoon, and is steadily continuing. Snow commenced falling at about 9 o'clock this evening, and still continues. Large quantities have fallen up to the present time.
HALLETT, July 23. The weather has been bitterly cold all day, and snow is now falling fast.
JAMESTOWN, July 23. It has been bitterly cold all day. A heavy snowstorm is now falling.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967257
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429370
APA citation
LOCAL TELEGRAMS. (1879, July 26). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 7. Retrieved October 26, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967257

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373313

A correspondent at the Burra, writing on July 24, says:—"On Monday last the wind changed round from the west, from which quarter it had been hlowing for a long time, to the east, and on Wednesday the cold became intense. Almost everyone remarked that it was cold enough for snow, and big coats and wrappers were freely used all day. Several old hands declared that they would rather have hot winds. At about 7 p.m. the storm increased, with a few drops of rain, but it soon began to snow, and for more than three hours there was a driving snowstorm, which it was almost impossible to face; in some places where the snow beat against walls, roofs, and fences it became a hard solid mass. This morning the hills were capped with the pure white snow, and being such a novelty it naturally created excitement amongst those who have never been in the old country. I met with a man who had to face the storm for a mile, and he said that although he had lived in England twenty winters he never felt the cold so severe before. He could only go a few yards without turning his back to the weather. He felt it cutting his eyes, ears, and face to such an extent that he had to cover his face and feel his way along by the fence; when he reached home he had flakes of ice on his coat and hat. The weather has greatly moderated.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373313
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293172
APA citation
The Advertiser. FRIDAY, JULY 25,1879. (1879, July 25). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373313

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The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Thursday 24 July 1879 page 4.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/29373261

The Advertiser. THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1879.
The weather on Wednesday was unusually cold. There were heavy falls of snow at Jamestown, Hallett, and the Burra.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373261
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page2293162
APA citation
The Advertiser. THURSDAY, JULY 24,1879. (1879, July 24). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 4. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29373261

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Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 8.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197576064

{quoting snow-relevant text and text about a destructive wind gust at EDEOWIE]

EDEOWIE, July 28.
On Tuesday night, 22nd instant, one of the most furious gusts of wind within the memory of the oldest inhabitants passed over Edeowie, carrying with it havoc, devastation, and the stable of the Edeowie Hotel, while gigantic limbs of eucalypti lie prostrate strewed around the bed of the creek for some distance.

PEKINA, July 29.  We had a fine fall of snow here on Wednesday last, some of it laying on the ground till Sunday.

MELROSE, July 30. Last week we had two days snow in the Mount, and the weather was very cold. Since then we are having genial seasonable weather.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197576064
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22356419
APA citation
COUNTRY LETTERS. (1879, August 1). Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880), p. 8. Retrieved October 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197576064

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South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Thursday 24 July 1879 Page 5.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43091403

Jamestown, July 23. To-day was intensely cold, and to-night heavy rain has set in from the south-east. [Later Telegram.] Heavy snow is falling, mixed with sleet and rain.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43091403
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3998001
APA citation
WEATHER IN THE COUNTRY. (1879, July 24). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 5. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43091403

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 22.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93967391

TEROWIE, July 24.
Last night we had a heavy fall of snow. The whole of yesterday was bitterly cold, with a keen south-east wind. At about 8 o'clock it commenced snowing, and kept up till about 10. The snow was about a foot in depth against the exposed sides of houses. This morning the hills to the west were covered in snow, which, with the dark streaks caused by the ridges of stone, present a beautiful sight. — Farmers are busy fallowing, and all expect a good harvest.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967391
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429385
APA citation
TEROWIE, July 24. (1879, July 26). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 22. Retrieved October 26, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967391

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128497713

Snowstorm.— A beautiful sight was to be witnessed from Mintaro on Thursday morning, July 24. The Flagstaff Hill, near Black Springs, being covered with snow to the depth of several inches.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497713
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658384
APA citation
No title. (1879, July 25). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497713

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This snippet starting "SNOW" doesn't say what location it's referring to but I think it's likely to be Burra. There's a brief section of text immediately above it headed "Burra Hospital."

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Friday 25 July 1879 p 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/35951278

SNOW. — The weather has again changed and we have had it bitterly cold and wet. On Wednesday night there was a fall of snow which was still on the hills on Thursday morning.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35951278
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4740485
APA citation
District Courts Bill. (1879, July 25). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35951278

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Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197576048


Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197576048
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22356404
APA citation
THE WEATHER. (1879, July 25). Port Augusta Dispatch (SA : 1877 - 1880), p. 3. Retrieved November 14, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197576048

**************************************************

Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912) Friday 25 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/197728248

Latest Telegrams
PROVINCIAL TELEGRAMS.
SNOW IN THE NORTH
Melrose, July 25.
The Flinders Range presented a beautiful appearance yesterday. The tops were covered with snow for 30 miles from south of Mount Remarkable to north of Mount Brown. At noon to-day snow was still on the summit of Mount Remarkable.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728248
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page22392579
APA citation
Latest Telegrams. (1879, July 25). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 Edition: SECOND EDITION. Retrieved October 25, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197728248

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 26 July 1879 Page 22.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93967412

YATINA. July 23.
We have had extremely cold weather for the last ten days with a very drying wind from the north- west. To-day we had a good fall of rain, sleet, and snow. ...

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967412
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429385
APA citation
YATINA, July 23. (1879, July 26). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 22. Retrieved October 19, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93967412

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{Below is an extraordinary report from Mount Bryan West! The writer reports "Snow fell here on the evening and night of the 23rd ult., four feet deep in places, which remained on the ranges over fourteen clear days." The writer also reports that "The ground was covered with snow here at 9pm on the 4th inst., and was covered again at 5p.m., on the 6th." According to my calculations, 14 clear days from the evening and night of the 23rd July takes us to the evening and night of the 6th August. From the evening and night of the 23rd July to the evening and night of the 3rd August is 11 clear days without any reported additional falls of snow, then we have one reported snowfall on 4th to take us to the 14 clear days., when there was another fall covering the ground by 5pm. I don't recall seeing any any other periods reported in the South Australian snowfalls I've investigated where some snow remained in patches as long as 10 clear days unassisted or 14 clear days assisted!}

{For reasons unknown, Trove's electronically translated text of this newspaper article is uncharacteristically poor, whereas I found it relatively easy to read most of it. I've not been able to find this article in any other paper on the Trove database or anywhere else on the internet. I didn't correct the electronically translated text. I'm confident my reading of the article is accurate in all important details. Here it is, and below this is a screen-grab of Trove's digital image of microfilm of the article.}

Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Friday 15 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/35950478

MOUNT BRYAN WEST, AUGUST 13.
Snow fell here on the evening and night of
the 23rd ult., four feet deep in places, which
remained on the ranges over fourteen clear
days. In Banbury ward, hundreds of gums,
peppermints, and sheeoaks had a quantity of
limbs and branches broken down with snow
and are now to be seen. On the morning
of the 24th ult, icicles from 10 to 14 inches long
were suspended at the bottom of every
hollow of the iron that covered our kitchen in
which we had a large fire all night and the heat
must have melted the snow on the roof during
the night, other places covered with iron had
no ice on them. The ground was covered
with snow here at 9pm on the 4th inst., and
was covered again at 5p.m., on the 6th.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35950478

Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4740497

APA citation
MOUNT BRYAN WEST, AUGUST 13. (1879, August 15). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 10, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35950478

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Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/35948774

CORRESPONDENCE.
(From our own Correspondents.)
MOUNT BRYAN EAST, June 28. [This was published on Friday 1 August so June 28 should be July 28 - Miles]
Since my last we have had some splendd weather, though at times very cold and frosty and there has been a splendid fall of rain and snow. The snow began to fall about 7 o'clock on Wednesday evening, and lasted for more than five hours; the ground was covered three or four inches deep, the hills were covered for thirty-six hours afterwards, and there is snow on Mount Bryan Range at the present time. There has not been such a f.ll up here for something like eighteen years as there was last Wednesday night.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35948774
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page4740490
APA citation
CORRESPONDENCE. (1879, August 1). Burra Record (SA : 1878 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved November 11, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35948774

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Published Saturday 2nd August, written Monday 28th July, so "On Monday" would refer to Monday 21st July. This is likely an error on the part of the writer, as elsewhere in the Mid-North the heavy snow was reported on Wednesday night 23rd.

South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 2 August 1879 Page 21.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93969009

Country News
[From our Country Correspondents.]
BLACK SPRINGS, July 28.
On Monday, at about half-past 7 o'clock, it commenced to snow heavily, and lasted for several hours. Some of the snow remained on the hilltops for several days. It was the heaviest fall of snow that has taken place for many years in this part. The weather is now fine, but very frosty.— Feed is scarce.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969009
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429412
APA citation
Country News. (1879, August 2). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 21. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969009

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The Wallaroo Times and Mining Journal (Port Wallaroo, SA : 1865 - 1881) Saturday 9 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/110353079

I suppose you have heard about the snow we had on the Dutchman. There was one part of the Flinders Range that looked most beautifullast week, from a heavy fall, and it lasted two days, and when the sun shone it was really splendid. Some of the residents of Quorn went out in their traps and visited the place, and others engaged in snow balling in the township, in the evening, so that shows well for the cold winters in the north of which we have heard so much remarked that it is a country that only gets rain about once or so in twelve months. The squatters cried it down well for a long time till they found out they could not manage to do so any longer.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article110353079
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10405552
APA citation
QUORN. (1879, August 9). The Wallaroo Times and Mining Journal (Port Wallaroo, SA : 1865 - 1881), p. 2. Retrieved October 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article110353079

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Tuesday 12 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128498670

FARRELL'S FLAT.
[From our own Correspondent.]
August 6.
Since my last we have been visited with a good fall of snow, and for the first time snowballing was carried on here in the streets. The fall was heavy here but it must have been a great deal heavier further up the line, as trucks on the goods train from Hallett were partly covered with the white visitor. As a matter of course the weather was intensely cold with a sharp frost, and very little change has taken place in the atmosphere since.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128498670
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658404
APA citation
FARRELL'S FLAT. (1879, August 12). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128498670

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 2 August 1879 Page 21
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93969034

LAUNCELOT, July 28. [a Monday - Miles]
We experienced a heavy fall of snow on Wednesday night [Wed 23rd July - Miles], and on the following morning the ground was covered two inches in depth.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969034
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429412
APA citation
LAUNCELOT, JULY 28. (1879, August 2). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 21. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969034

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South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881) Saturday 2 August 1879 p 21.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93969028

LAURA, July 29.
Next to the rops comes the weather, which has been extremely cold. We did not have a fall of snow in the township, but the tops of the hills only a few miles away were quite white with it. The sight of the snow on the Mannanarie hills, fully twenty miles distant, greatly pleased those who saw it, many never having, seen snow-covered hills before. Commercial gentlemen arriving from further north profess to have had strange experiences in the snow, the relation of which tested our credulity to the utmost. We are now having fine days, but the mornings and nights are still very cold.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969028
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429412
APA citation
LAURA, JULY 29. (1879, August 2). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 21. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969028

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Tuesday 5 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128500102

MOUNT BRYAN FLAT.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 31.
The weather has been much warmer during the last few days. Yesterday and today have been like spring. The warmth has improved the appearance of the wheat and grass, although they are very backward. There are still a few patches of snow on the Range, but it has shrunk a good deal during the past two days. It looks strange to see snow on the hills and feel the weather quite warm.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128500102
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658396
APA citation
MOUNT BRYAN FLAT. (1879, August 5). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128500102

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South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Saturday 9 August 1879 Page 6.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/43091115

{quoting only snow-relevant text and text relevant to the barque Kalahome}

During the night of July 23, an unusual quantity of snow fell in the hilly districts, extending from the coast to more than 200 miles inland. The barque Kalahome from Newcastle, N.S.W., with coal for the Rivoli Bay Railway, ran aground on Glen's Point near Penguin Island, July 24, but was got off July 27, after lightering seventy tons of cargo, and throwing seventy tons more overboard.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43091115
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page3997440
APA citation
ABSTRACT OF NEWS. (1879, August 9). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 6. Retrieved October 27, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43091115

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128497918

APPILA.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 25.
A public meeting was held at Appila-Yarrowie on July 23 to discuss the working of the present Land Act." ... "The meeting was a thoroughly representative one, notwithstanding the severity of the weather. It rained steadily during the evening, with a strong easterly wind, which was almost unbearably cold; but notwithstanding this drawback many persons came from a long distance, showing thereby the lively interest which was taken in the proceedings.
On Thursday morning a grand sight was visible from this place. The Mannanarie ranges were covered with snow, and it did not entirely disappear until this evening.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497918
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658392
APA citation
APPILA. (1879, August 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497918

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 2. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106562459

Tarcowie.— Our Tarcowie correspondent writing on the 24th inst. (but whose letter we did not receive until the 28 th), says:— " Last night we had a very heavy fell of snow lasting for several hours, the ranges were covered for miles, and in many places it was over a foot thick.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562459
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574065
APA citation
The The Kapunda Herald. (1879, August 1). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 2. Retrieved October 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562459

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497926 

BLACK ROCK PLAIN.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 28. During the early part of last week the weather was extremely cold, which resulted on Wednesday night in a heavy fall of rain and snow. On Thursday morning the surrounding hills presented a grand spectacle in their white robes, strongly reminding a person of the old country.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497926
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658392
APA citation
BLACK ROCK PLAIN. (1879, August 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497926

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This article below would suggest that there wasn't a snow cover at Rivertown itself on the morning of Wednesday 23rd.

RIVERTON. (1879, August 1). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106562454

RIVERTON
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 28, 1879.
Things are as dull as ever here. Every one complains of the cold, and not without reason, as on Wednesday last [23rd - Miles] we had a fall of snow at Macaw Creek, about three miles south of Riverton.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562454
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574065
APA citation
RIVERTON. (1879, August 1). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved October 30, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562454

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Friday 1 August 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128497924

YACKA.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 28.
In common with other parts of the colony we have had a continuance of wet and cold weather, but the snow storms that visited different places in the North did not reach this township. I am told by old residents that they never experienced such cold weather before in Australia.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497924
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658392
APA citation
YACKA. (1879, August 1). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497924

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Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954) Tuesday 29 July 1879 Page 2.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128497372

MOUNT BRYAN FLAT.
[From our own Correspondent.]
July 24.

Since my last nothing worth mentioning has happened here. The principal topic is the bad roads and cold weather, and it has been so cold that the crops and grass do not appear to grow. Tuesday and Wednesday were very cold, with an east wind. I happened to be out late last night, and found it very dark and cold until it commenced to snow, when it appeared to become much lighter Looking to the east to see where the light came from I was nearly blinded with snow, and when I reached home my children said I was a " snow man." Next morning I had some trouble to open the door, as the snow reached from the top to the bottom of it, and I had quite enough to do for a time to shovel the barrier away. The hills have been covered all day with snow, and there is a good deal lying in heaps! It is the first time that I have seen it remain on the plains all day, although I have seen it stay on the ranges for a week. Unless we get more warm weather than we have had lately there will be plenty of snow on Mount Bryan Range for weeks to come, so if the Clare young men like to come up here I think they will find snow- balling a better game than football — at any rate it would be a greater novelty to them.

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497372
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page9658388
APA citation
MOUNT BRYAN FLAT. (1879, July 29). Northern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved November 15, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128497372

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Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951) Tuesday 29 July 1879 Page 2.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/106562435

The Weather and the Crops in the Areas.—Mr. James Shakes (of Messrs. Liston, Shakes, & Co.), who has recently returned from a trip to the North, has kindly furnished us with the following interesting particulors:—" ... On Wednesday at Quorn it rained from about half-past 10 in the morning to daylight next morning, and by the appearance of the country there must have been nearly an inch, and as it came from the south-east and east the plains would be sure to participate in the welcome downfall on Thursday morning. Whilst on the way by tram from Quorn to Port Augusta a pleasing sight presented itself. Mount Brown and the Mount Arden Ranges were beautifully capped with snow, causing at Port Augusta and the neighbourhood quite a sensation, the experience of the settlers in regard to colonial snow having been of a rather disagreeable nature, requiring to be washed off with water and occasionally down with sundry half-pints of XXX or other exhilarating beverage. On the road back and when on the range near Canowie, Mount Bryan and the Razorback presented a sight which to a colonial like myself will be long remembered, the whole being covered with snow several feet in thickness. The weather the whole distance from Kapunda to Quorn and Port Augusta was intensely cold."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562435
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10574060
APA citation
The Kapunda Herald. (1879, July 29). Kapunda Herald (SA : 1878 - 1951), p. 2. Retrieved November 15, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106562435

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James Butler aged 18 perishes outdoors in South Australian snowfall near Jamestown in 1879.

James Butler aged 18 perished outdoors in a snowfall near Jamestown in 1879. Two companions survived albeit very drunk and apparently asleep when James Butler moved away from their horse-drawn conveyance and died. The subsequent inquest decided death had resulted from cold and exposure. Some questions will remain forever unanswered.

Here's an account of the incident and inquest findings as reported in a newspaper.
Source: Trove website.
South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881)
Saturday 9 August 1879 Page 10.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/93969123

"The Jamestown Review says : — "On Saturday morning, July 26, news was brought in that the dead body of a young man named James Butler, aged 18, had been found on the Yarcowie-road, about two miles from Jamestown. It appears that on Wednesday evening, July 23, the deceased started from Jamestown in company with John Butler and William Alford, and that deceased was quite sober, but that his two companions were almost helplessly drunk. When they left deceased was driving. Nothing more was known until Friday, when deceased's friends, becoming uneasy at his unexplained absence, proceeded to make enquiries, which elicited the fact that the missing man had not been seen by any of his friends. On Saturday morning a search party started, and found the body about 100 yards from the road in a paddock belonging to Mr. Mattey. Of the two companions of the deceased one, W. Alford, had returned to his farm up North, the other, John Butler, was present at the inquest, but declared himself unable to remember anything which had happened on Wednesday after 11 or 12 o'clock am. This witness stated that he awoke early on Thursday morning and found himself in the spring-cart nearly perished with cold and half covered with snow. Alford, who seems to have been tbe least drunk of the two, was standing near, but neither of them seems to have missed the deceased or to remember that they had started in his company. They found in the cart a waterproof overcoat, which they recognised as belonging to deceased, and in one of the pockets there was a bottle of rum with the seal unbroken. This was at about six miles from Jamestown. There was also an empty gin bottle at the back of the cart. Both the men, half frozen as they were, made their way home, and seem to have had a vague impression that deceased had come part of the way with them and started back again to Jamestown. From the position in which the body was found it seems probable that deceased left the cart intending to make to Mr. Mattey's residence, but was overcome with the cold. It will be remembered that the night of Wednesday was one of the most severe ever known in the North. The darkness and cold were intense, and heavy snow was falling. An inquest was held at the Globe Hotel on Sunday by Mr. J. Coombe, J.P. Evidence, of which the foregoing is a digest, was taken, and Dr. J. A. Cockburn deposed that the marks of struggling where the body was found were somewhat inconsistent with the assumption that deceased had died from cold, but that he could not pronounce positively as to the cause of death without a post-mortem. This having been directed, the inquest was adjourned to 7 p.m , at which hour the doctor resumed his evidence, and informed the Jury that he had found the vessels of the brain enormously congested, the stomach perfectly empty, and the rest of the organs in a normal condition. The appearances were such as might be expected when death had resulted from cold and exposure. The Jury returned a verdict accordingly."

Article identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969123
Page identifier
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page8429427
APA citation
CORONERS' INQUESTS. (1879, August 9). South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 10. Retrieved January 31, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969123  "

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End of "1879: widespread snowfall ...".

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